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Mentoring Affirmations and Interventions A Bridge to Graduate School for Latina/o Students

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Abstract

Using individual interviews, this study examined how a group of Latina/o undergraduate students in Texas considered graduate studies. Findings reveal that familial support, perceived community responsibility, and their participation in a mentoring program all played a considerable role in demystifying graduate studies. Implications support the notion that mentoring relationships can effectively create a bridge towards graduate education for underrepresented student populations.

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... Interestingly, this theme presents a different lens of immigrant students' social networks than the previous theme, which focused on students lacking resources in their homes and communities. Instead, this theme demonstrates that financial support or cultural capital are not the only means of one's microsystem positively contributing to the higher education experience (Diaz-Strong et al., 2011;Easley et al., 2012;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Morales et al., 2011). Further, scholars discussed how the value of community for some immigrants led them to be proactive in seeking out social networks needed to support their college access and persistence, which reinforced their success (Mahaffy & Pantoja, 2012;Person & Rosenbaum, 2006;Riegle-Crumb, 2010). ...
... Another way in which scholars described immigrants positively within the U.S. higher education context was by demonstrating that this population often has high levels of motivation and resilience, despite structural inequalities and other barriers that they face in pursuing higher education (De La Cruz, 2008;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Morales et al., 2011;Tauriac & Liem, 2012). Similarly, articles focused on college access discussed immigrants having high college going and career aspirations (Arbelo-Marrero & Milacci, 2016;Griffin et al., 2012). ...
... Frameworks like community cultural wealth were used to highlight the knowledge, resources, and skills that immigrants have, and which can often go unacknowledged and unreinforced in U.S. educational environments (Kouyoumdjian et al., 2017;Tierney, 2013). The final theme focused on activism and advocacy (Luna & Prieto, 2009;Morales et al., 2011;Pena et al., 2007;Perez et al., 2010). A few scholars demonstrated how being an immigrant alongside experiencing challenges and oppression in U.S. higher education led some students to become activists for greater educational and other forms of equity for their immigrant communities (Deangelo et al., 2016;Madrigal-Garcia & Acevedo Gil, 2016;Mendez & Cabrera, 2015). ...
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As immigrant students continue to enter U.S. education at growing rates, it has become increasingly important for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to understand these students' pathways into and through college as well as the factors impacting their success. Using a systematic review, this analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of how global mobility shapes and is shaped by U.S. higher education, particularly in how immigrant identity and immigrants' experiences are depicted in U.S. higher education scholarship.
... Students reported feeling safe, comfortable, and supported by their mentors. Moreover, in a study by Luna and Prieto (2009), Latina/o students reported several benefits from being mentored by graduate students and faculty including preparation for graduate school, expanded social networks, and sense of self-empowerment. Further, qualitative findings by Dahlvig (2010) indicated that relationships with mentors served as an encouragement to Black women at a Christian Predominantly White Institution. ...
... Finally, familial capital describes the strength that can be drawn from connections to one's family, history, and heritage. When viewed within this frame, mentoring relationships may provide students access to new forms of capital, but also help them tap into the capital they possess within their own communities (Luna & Prieto, 2009). ...
... The reviewed research extends prior knowledge regarding potential benefits of mentoring for both the protégé (student) and mentor (Amaral & Vala, 2009;Campbell, Smith, Dugan, & Komives, 2012), sensemaking of the mentoring relationship and associated experiences (Griffin, 2013;Luna & Prieto, 2009), and mentoring as related to civic outcomes such as social responsibility and socially responsive leadership (Haddock et al., 2013). Qualitative findings also add to knowledge regarding the mentee and mentor matching process, students' and mentors' expectations for mentoring relationships, and what mentoring looks like in the context of particular disciplines and programs. ...
... 1,3 The NAS committee characterized the education pipeline as "understandably leaky" because of the barriers to higher education faced by minority students, yet still defined success in terms of professional career outcomes-trainees who become health care providers, biotechnology employees, academics or science writers. 2 Recommendations for improvement focused on measures such as streamlining transfers from community and minority-serving colleges and increasing access to minority faculty mentors. 4,5,6 We argue for an expanded definition of success for minority education, in which departures from the pipeline are not simply seen as leaks to be patched, but as an irrigation system that supports productive academic-community partnerships and fosters minority engagement in science education. Minority trainees who exit the pipeline and return to their communities represent potential research partners and can play a key role as ambassadors for higher education and research. ...
... Regardless of level of college education or discipline, students represent social networks that can nurture community partnerships. 4,5,6 If those partnerships are based in the principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR), they provide a vehicle for addressing community priorities. By applying CBPR principles of collaboration to minority training (Table 1), and linking training to participatory research initiatives, academic research centers invest in people who can foster sustainable partnerships with minority communities which can, in turn, promote interest in science and health careers. ...
... They may move in and out of university to attend to life events, route through community colleges, or work off loans after completing each step on the educational trajectory. 4,5,7 Creating roadblocks for trainees who seek education in segments, rather than moving continuously through the pipeline, exacerbates minority exclusion from academic and research systems. We often hear from our trainees that they need a break from the pressures of school to apply what they've learned to addressing community priorities, as well as to reassess personal priorities and refocus career goals. ...
Article
Background: Higher education has long made efforts to increase underrepresented minority participation in biomedical research and health fields. However, relatively few minority trainees complete advanced degrees or proceed to independent research careers, a loss referred to as the "leaky pipeline." Minority trainees may take alternate pathways to climbing the academic ladder, exiting to pursue multiple disciplinary or community-serving roles. Objective: The authors propose a model for understanding minority departures from the education pipeline as a basis for supporting careers that align with community goals for health. Methods: Concepts of the traditional pipeline training model are compared with a model that aligns with community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles and practices. The article describes an irrigation model that incorporates informal learning from academic and community knowledge bases to prepare trainees for CBPR and interdisciplinary research. Students serve as agents that foster individual, institutional, and social change needed to address health problems while attending to root causes of disparities. Conclusions: Viewing minority students as agents for community engagement allows institutions to reassess the role training can play in diversifying participation in higher education and research. An irrigation model supports development of an infrastructure that optimizes success at all post-secondary levels, and enhances CBPR capacity wherever trainees live, work, and learn. Linking formal education to informal learning in context of CBPR experiences can also reduce community mistrust of research while nurturing productive research partnerships with communities to address health disparities.
... Even when a rich profusion of research on graduate students can be found in the social science domain, there is comparatively little available on marginalized US graduate students. Most of the available research focuses on graduate students of color and females, and the major theme across research in at least the past three decades has been the role of advising in the retention and success of historically marginalized graduate students in the US (Blackwell, 1987;Abatso et al., 1987;Frierson, 1990;Willie, 1991;Terenzini, 1996;Brown et al., 1999;Brown, 2000;Gay, 2004;Golde and Dore, 2004;Girves et al., 2005;Thomas et al., 2007;Luna and Prieto, 2009;Pau, 2009;Fuhrmann et al., 2011;McGee et al., 2012;Sauermann and Roach, 2012;Gibbs et al., 2014;McCallum, 2017;Roach and Sauermann, 2017;Sevelius et al., 2020;and Ullrich et al., 2021). The research is even more sparse when looking at minority groups based on other factors such as functional limitations (Jain et al., 2020;Tamjeed et al., 2021), citizenship (Zhou, 2010) or age (Rose, 2005). ...
... Therefore, due to their ideological and experiential influence, advisers become one of the students' most important reference points in understanding and adapting to the scientific research system. It has been shown that effective mentoring relationships can be used to encourage underrepresented students to go to graduate schools (Luna and Prieto, 2009). Gay (2004) continues to bring to our attention how the concept of "giving back to the community" plays an influential role for these students. ...
Article
Purpose This paper aims to describe the “InDO: Institute Demographic Ontology” and demonstrates the InDO-based semiautomated process for both generating and extending a knowledge graph to provide a comprehensive resource for marginalized US graduate students. The knowledge graph currently consists of instances related to the semistructured National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (NSF SED) 2019 analysis report data tables. These tables contain summary statistics of an institute’s doctoral recipients based on a variety of demographics. Incorporating institute Wikidata links ultimately produces a table of unique, clearly readable data. Design/methodology/approach The authors use a customized semantic extract transform and loader (SETLr) script to ingest data from 2019 US doctoral-granting institute tables and preprocessed NSF SED Tables 1, 3, 4 and 9. The generated InDO knowledge graph is evaluated using two methods. First, the authors compare competency questions’ sparql results from both the semiautomatically and manually generated graphs. Second, the authors expand the questions to provide a better picture of an institute’s doctoral-recipient demographics within study fields. Findings With some preprocessing and restructuring of the NSF SED highly interlinked tables into a more parsable format, one can build the required knowledge graph using a semiautomated process. Originality/value The InDO knowledge graph allows the integration of US doctoral-granting institutes demographic data based on NSF SED data tables and presentation in machine-readable form using a new semiautomated methodology.
... The influence of a high-quality mentor can be particularly important during a URM student's senior year of college, a critical period in which decisions are being made about future careers (Green, 1991;Estrada et al., 2018). Previous work has identified a mentor's pivotal role during the senior year for students from some URM groups in STEM, such as African-American students (Davis, 2009;Hernandez et al., 2017), but our understanding of the development of high-quality mentoring relationships (and their benefits) specifically among Hispanic students in STEM fields at this critical period is still emerging and unclear (Luna and Prieto, 2009;NASEM, 2019). What is abundantly clear is that Hispanics are the second-largest (but fastest-growing) racial/ethnic group in the U.S. K-12 education system (27%) and that they aspire to STEM careers at rates comparable to their White peers (47% vs. 50%, respectively), but that they make up less than 14% of baccalaureate degree earners and less than 8% of the workforce in science and engineering disciplines (Hispanic Heritage Foundation, 2020;Hussar et al., 2020;NCSES, 2021). ...
... The current study aimed to address gaps in the mentoring literature about factors that help Hispanic college seniors in STEM fields both develop high-quality faculty mentoring relationships and experience the benefits related to mentorship (Luna and Prieto, 2009;NASEM, 2019). Guided by the POMM framework and the extant literature on mentoring Hispanic undergraduates (Ortiz-Walters and Gilson, 2005;Eby et al., 2013;Hernandez et al., 2017;Estrada et al., 2018), we hypothesized that the benefits of mentor-protégé demographic and psychological similarities on support and satisfaction would be made stronger by higher levels of contact frequency. ...
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Mentoring relationships can be important for promoting the success and persistence of undergraduates, particularly for students from historically underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. While mentoring is often cited as important for attracting and retaining students from underrepresented groups in STEM, little is known about the differential mentoring processes that can result from similar and dissimilar mentor-protégé pairs. The present study tests the process-oriented mentorship model (POMM) regarding how mentor-protégé similarities and the moderating role of contact frequency influence mentorship quality and STEM research career persistence intentions among faculty-mentored Hispanic STEM majors in their senior year of college. The results indicate that mentor-protégé similarity matters. Specifically, higher levels of mentor-protégé psychological similarity were related to higher levels of psychosocial support and relationship satisfaction. Hispanic students with a Hispanic faculty mentor reported engaging in more coauthoring opportunities than peers with non-Hispanic mentors. Among those with higher contact frequency, students with same-gender mentors had higher levels of relationship satisfaction than peers with different-gender mentors; however, there were no differences among those with low contact frequency. Additionally, protégés who reported coauthoring support were more likely to also report commitment to pursuing a STEM research career.
... There has been very little empirical work conducted that explicitly examines the role of mentoring in facilitating the development of students' cultural wealth and capital (Luna & Prieto, 2009). Exceptions include work by Enriquez (2011) who explored ways in which undocumented Latinx K-12 students used social capital to pursue college. ...
... More importantly, this approach counters the deficit narrative of Latinx students by demonstrating how they leveraged their existing capital gained through high school, precollegiate, and early college mentoring experiences to navigate the community college environment. In line with prior research in this area (Bensimon & Dowd, 2009;Bordes & Arredondo, 2005;DeFreitas & Bravo, 2012;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Tovar, 2015;Zell, 2010), our findings underscore the potential for a variety of mentors to serve as critical sources of support for Latinx community college students. Moreover, mentoring programs and other support programs should have tailored approaches that place value in the assets and capital Latinx students already bring with them to college. ...
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Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this study was to better understand the sources of mentoring and ways in which mentors, as forms of social and familial capital, facilitate the development of capital among Latinx community college students Background: A more focused and nuanced understanding of the role of mentors in further developing Latinx students’ capital is needed to guide mentoring programs in designing asset-based programs that recognize and build upon students’ community cultural wealth Methodology: Drawing from Solórzano and Yosso’s (2001) work, we use asset-based, counter-storytelling as a qualitative, methodological approach to reframe the deficit perspective that is embedded in prior literature on Latinx college students. The sample included 11 Latinx community college students who participated in the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Contribution: Results suggest that mentoring programs designed to serve Latinx community college students may be more efficient and may provide more meaningful support by recognizing and building upon the assets and capital provided by students’ networks and communities. Findings: Interviews revealed that participants leveraged community cultural wealth in the form of mentoring networks established prior to and during college, to develop other forms of capital that enabled them to reach their educational goals. Recommendations for Practitioners: The paper provides practical implications for mentoring programs, initiatives that include a mentoring component, as well as more generally for institutional agents who support Latinx students. Recommendation for Researchers: Findings provide a foundation for future research opportunities that could further examine how supportive relationships with institutional agents promote the educational and professional success of Latinx community college students. Future Research: Several suggestions for future research are provided, including qualitative work that explores how students identify and interact with mentors and other institutional agents during college and how they utilize these relationships to navigate the college environment.
... Two types of mentoring, instrumental and psychological, occur simultaneously in an integrated manner (Laden, 2000;Luna & Prieto, 2012). Instrumental mentoring refers to processes such as teaching, advising, coaching, advocating, and connecting with resources; while psychological mentoring includes emotional support and validation (Laden, 2000). ...
... Both types of mentoring help mentees enhance their self-esteem and sense of competence and efficacy (Laden, 2000). Studies document that integrated mentoring expands a mentees' network, sense of self-empowerment, and overall academic and career preparation (Luna & Prieto, 2012). Crisp and Cruz (2012) distinguish four types of support: emotional, educational and career related, knowledge of academics, and role modeling. ...
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The underrepresentation of Latinas/os in the social work profession, especially in higher levels of administration, has been amply documented. Successful Latina/o professionals can address the need for Latina/o leadership in the field by mentoring new graduates and supporting their development and career planning as they enter the professional world. This article presents an innovative mentoring program for Latina/o social work professionals conceptualized and led by the Latina/o Network of the Latina/o Network of the Connecticut chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). The program matches a Latina/o master’s in social work graduating student with a senior Latina/o social work professional. The model of the mentoring program incorporates a coordinator, a liaison to each mentor-mentee dyad, a mentor-mentee developmental relationship, and group gatherings. A key aspect of the model is the attention to and inclusion of Latino cultural values of familismo, personalismo, confianza, and colectivismo, to foster the development of a sense of community. Empirical and anecdotal data illustrate the outcomes of the program. The implementation of the program, the lessons learned, and its applicability to other professionals and cultural groups are discussed.
... Latino faculty provided academic direction and personal advice on multiple levels. In their study of a group of Latino students in Texas entering graduate programs, Luna and Prieto (2009) found that participants reported increased networking, a greater appreciation of the requirements needed to be successful in graduate school and a sense of empowerment from having been assigned a faculty mentor. Furthermore, they cite past research in which students who have been mentored report stronger academic self-efficacy and greater satisfaction with their academic program; among many other demonstrated educational benefits such as increased retention and higher grade point averages (as cited in Luna & Prieto, 2009). ...
... In their study of a group of Latino students in Texas entering graduate programs, Luna and Prieto (2009) found that participants reported increased networking, a greater appreciation of the requirements needed to be successful in graduate school and a sense of empowerment from having been assigned a faculty mentor. Furthermore, they cite past research in which students who have been mentored report stronger academic self-efficacy and greater satisfaction with their academic program; among many other demonstrated educational benefits such as increased retention and higher grade point averages (as cited in Luna & Prieto, 2009). ...
Article
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Latino individuals who prefer to communicate in Spanish lack linguistically and culturally proficient mental health professionals with whom they can communicate effectively. This study illustrates the components necessary to facilitate the overall success of Latino, Spanish-speaking students in attaining advanced degrees in mental health services and developing them into competent bilingual service providers. Findings indicate that this shortage may be addressed with the assistance of higher education programs providing financial support, cultural and linguistic competency training, and both peer and faculty mentoring.
... Two types of mentoring, instrumental and psychological, occur simultaneously in an integrated manner (Laden, 2000;Luna & Prieto, 2012). Instrumental mentoring refers to processes such as teaching, advising, coaching, advocating, and connecting with resources; while psychological mentoring includes emotional support and validation (Laden, 2000). ...
... Both types of mentoring help mentees enhance their self-esteem and sense of competence and efficacy (Laden, 2000). Studies document that integrated mentoring expands a mentees' network, sense of self-empowerment, and overall academic and career preparation (Luna & Prieto, 2012). Crisp and Cruz (2012) distinguish four types of support: emotional, educational and career related, knowledge of academics, and role modeling. ...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: The underrepresentation of Latinas/os in the social work profession, especially in higher levels of administration, has been amply documented. Successful Latina/o professionals can address the need for Latina/o leadership in the field by mentoring new graduates and supporting their development and career planning as they enter the professional world. This article presents an innovative mentoring program for Latina/o social work professionals conceptualized and led by the Latina/o Network of the Latina/o Network of the Connecticut chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). The program matches a Latina/o master’s in social work graduating student with a senior Latina/o social work professional. The model of the mentoring program incorporates a coordinator, a liaison to each mentor-mentee dyad, a mentor-mentee developmental relationship, and group gatherings. A key aspect of the model is the attention to and inclusion of Latino cultural values of familismo, personalismo, confianza, and colectivismo, to foster the development of a sense of community.Empirical and anecdotal data illustrate the outcomes of the program. The implementation of the program, the lessons learned, and its applicability to other professionals and cultural groups are discussed.
... Unlike the graduate students, who had preexisting and already positive relationships with their advisors, the community of practice was novel to the undergraduates and through the workshop series it was explicitly communicated that mentoring is a route to mastery (Figure 1b). This is crucial, because undergraduates who have mentored research experiences are more likely to persist in natural science majors, pursue additional research experiences, and seek out intentional mentors when applying to graduate school (Emery et al., 2019;Hathaway et al., 2002;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Starr et al., 2020;Wilson et al., 2012). Furthermore, healthy mentoring relationships can empower undergraduates to advocate for themselves if they feel uncomfortable or unsafe, which can prevent negative mentoring experiences and increase their likelihood of persisting in STEM (Fleischner et al., 2017;McGill et al., 2021;Zavaleta et al., 2020). ...
Article
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Abstract High‐quality mentoring relationships can be pivotal to recruitment, retention, and long‐term persistence in ecology majors and careers. The graduate–undergraduate student mentoring relationship can become uniquely important during activities like ecological fieldwork. However, graduate students often have little experience as research mentors, which can lead to negative research experiences for undergraduate mentees. Given the potential for mentoring relationships to impact people's decisions on pursuing ecological studies and/or careers, we created and piloted a mentoring professional development program designed around intentional mentoring. Intentional mentoring requires that mentors preemptively identify what skills and knowledge their mentee should develop as well as the practices to help mentees develop these competencies. Our rationale for using intentional mentoring was that it has the potential to increase mentors' and mentees' awareness of issues around diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in research experiences, in addition to developing professional competencies. To evaluate our program, we conducted focus group interviews with graduate and undergraduate student participants following a multi‐week mentoring training workshop, the primary aspect of the program. Participants described an increased valuation of intentional mentoring and a desire to be more intentional in their mentoring relationships. Graduate student mentors described an increased desire to be more intentional mentors, whereas undergraduate mentees described an increased desire to seek mentors with whom they could develop intentional relationships. Undergraduates also better recognized the importance of academic mentors. Based on our evaluation, we posit that intentional mentoring can increase the retention and persistence of students with diverse identities in ecology by fostering a sense of belonging. We advocate the implementation of mentoring training workshops as a part of academic ecological programs to increase inclusion in our discipline.
... Mentorship is a key aspect of such relationships and has been shown to significantly impact racially/ethnically minoritized students' navigation of graduate school trajectories (Luna & Prieto, 2009;Phelps-Ward & DeAngelo, 2016). For Latina/o/x students, mentoring programs with faculty and graduate students lead to a better understanding of graduate programs and, in turn, foster students' aspirations to attend graduate school. ...
Article
In light of the need to both grow and diversify graduate enrollments in computing fields, this quantitative study examined variables associated with students’ initial aspirations for computing graduate school as well as how aspirations were sustained or developed over time. Using a longitudinal sample of undergraduate students who enrolled in introductory computing courses at 15 research universities, findings suggest that environments and interactions that sustain undergraduate students’ initial computing graduate aspirations are quite different than those that contribute to other students’ development of graduate aspirations. Specifically, this study highlights the key role of domain-specific psychosocial beliefs (i.e., computing identity, computing self-efficacy) in shaping students’ aspirations for graduate computing. Results also highlight important equity issues, particularly related to supporting graduate aspirations among underrepresented Students of Color in computing. We offer implications for cultivating gender and racial/ethnic diversity in computing graduate school pathways, which is imperative to generating more inclusive computing environments in the tech industry and academia.
... Rights reserved. Resistant capital A form of resiliency characterized by an individual's ability to resist negative stereotypes by "proving others wrong" while in pursuit of one's long-term goals (Yosso 2005;Oropeza et al. 2010;Pérez 2014;Samuelson and Litzler 2016); involvement in community-based programs, student organizations, or STEM programs where participation challenges the status quo, counteracts historical inequalities, and dispels negative stereotypes (Huber 2009;McPherson 2014; Ceglie and Settlage 2016) Resistant capital is often the basis for persisting in school and for succeeding academically (e.g., Luna and Prieto 2009;Burciaga and Erbstein 2013;Pérez 2014) A study of Latina/o engineering students found that students used resistant capital by engaging in role modeling and community outreach and via membership in a professional STEM organization (Revelo and Baber 2015) Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved. ...
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Informal learning organizations such as museums, zoos, aquaria, gardens, and community-based organizations are often positioned as having programming that fill a void that may exist in the lives of youth participants. Often these institutions do not recognize the assets that youth gain from their own homes and communities and bring to bear in these programs and that contribute to their success and persistence in STEM and academics. In this paper, we problematize the prevailing deficit-oriented approach to STEM enrichment programs for youth who are underrepresented in STEM. Drawing from Tara Yosso’s theory of community cultural wealth, we describe the STEM identity and trajectories of three individuals as they navigated a long-term, museum-based, informal science learning program. Using Yosso’s framework, we describe the capital that youth brought into the program and the ways that they leveraged this capital as they moved from middle to high school, and into their postsecondary studies and early careers in the sciences. Furthermore, we describe how their existing capital intertwined with capital they gained from the museum program in ways that fostered persistence and achievement in science.
... In the process of mentoring, mentors got the confidence of individual mentored to experience growth intellectual. [20,21,22] result of research suggest that the process of mentoring instrumental important in improving the progress of learning students, and the atmosphere of the academic in school. The pattern of learning interactive between mentors with guidance relate positive with their study [23], the confidence and motivation early [24]. ...
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Learning is basically the democratic process but unfortunately the study lacks the students’ diversity, so the academic atmosphere, the students’ body and collage progress are not optimal. The study patterns are still teacher centered unsustainable and lacking initiative. The learning material only emphasizes the concept that comes from the teaching book. Not optimizing the study program, it can also be reflected by the performance of alumni in the field. The performance of learning by the teacher (alumni) is not variable, generally in directional instruction manual. Teacher lacks experience and lack the ability to develop themselves in designing learning materials to utilize the environment around and learning from students’ activities. This study is directed to improve the academic climate to agreement that ultimately will contribute to independence and student learning initiative. The manner of learning is to apply the mentoring system conduct. The performance mechanism (group) USES the approach of the assessment and reflections. The results of the researcher: the performance of the play shows a significant difference between indicators. Indicators that shows the highest mentoring performance is indicator-1: building two-way communication with students. The construction of two-way communication between mentors with a group of students is easy to do by mentors, instead of other indicators like indikaor-4: conditioning the initiative to learn the initiative’s lesson with the relevant material. The difficulty of mentors in an indicator-4 achievement is to identify and design quickly the choice of relevant materials and according to the development of student groups. There were training and early preparation before the performance of the activity, but in the democratic process of learning the potential of problems, issues and new experiences with groups of students. Material is relevant to the problems that arise in learning process are not predictable. The performance of the performance for indicaor-6 was also low, but indicated the significant progress of the initial meeting to the end. Conclusion: the role of the mentors is very important in building communication and interaction with study in groups as well as the traffic of study groups and increasing the study of study and quality of the students’ work.
... expedite employment, research and publication, and timely completion" (Haro, 2004, p. 217) and facilitate pathways to a career beyond the doctorate. Furthermore, mentors demystify graduate school, provide a broader understanding of career paths and build networks across academia to bridge barriers they may experience (Luna & Prieto, 2009). ...
Article
This study explored the career outcomes for Latinx doctoral students and the contextual factors of their educational experience influencing these outcomes. A case-study approach is taken to examine the cases of doctoral students at the University of Michigan. These students were tracked each year, for 10 years post-graduation. Furthermore, an analysis of programmatic efforts to develop doctoral students and prepare them for the marketplace is also described as institutional structures that support career success.
... Structured mentoring is one important and effective method of enhancing scientists' career development (Ginther et al., 2011;Sambunjak, Straus, & Marusic, 2010). Varying in formality, duration, and other characteristics (Berk, Berg, Mortimer, Walton-Moss, & Yeo, 2005), mentoring is generally defined as the process through which experienced individuals (mentors) share their knowledge, skills, support, and guidance with less experienced individuals (mentees) (Luna & Prieto, 2009). Mentors support mentees in a variety of ways, including advising mentees in general career development matters, providing research training and specific professional development opportunities and resources (e.g. ...
Article
Hispanics are disproportionately affected by substance use and related health harms yet remain underrepresented across scientific disciplines focused on researching and addressing these issues. An interdisciplinary network of scientists committed to fostering the development of social and biomedical researchers focused on Hispanic substance use and health disparities developed innovative mentoring and career development activities. We conducted a formative evaluation study using anonymous membership and conference feedback data to describe specific mentoring and career development activities developed within the national network. Successful mentoring initiatives and career development activities were infused with cultural and community values supportive of professional integration and persistence. Mentoring initially occurred within an annual national conference and was then sustained throughout the year through formal training programs and informal mentoring networks. Although rigorous evaluation is needed to determine the success of these strategies in fostering long-term career development among scientists conducting Hispanic health and substance use research, this innovative model may hold promise for other groups committed to promoting career development and professional integration and persistence for minority (and non-minority) scientists committed to addressing health disparities.
... ate school applications (Bordes & Arredondo, 2005;Crisp & Cruz, 2009;Hurtado, Carter, & Spuler, 1996;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Terrion, 2010). A meta-analysis of mentoring studies found that the benefits of academic mentoring are generally stronger than the benefits of other types of mentoring, and mentoring affects students' attitudes more than their behaviors (Eby, Allen, Evans, Ng, & DuBois, 2008). ...
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Many students begin their college experience enrolled in large introductory classes. These classes are likely to enroll students who are at risk of leaving college without a degree. As such, these classes have the potential to reach at-risk students including first-year, first-generation, undeclared, and underrepresented minority (URM) students. Unfortunately, large lecture classes can make it difficult for students to develop meaningful relationships with faculty members or peers, even though it is known that the presence of strong faculty-student relationships predicts student engagement (Jaasma & Koper, 1999). One route to engaging students is the intentional use of evidence-based pedagogical practices. There have been substantial efforts to improve large lecture classes through the strategic use of discussion sections, active learning, and varied forms of assessment. Additionally, efforts to increase students’ engagement and persistence have taken place outside of the classroom. We believe that some evidence-based practices developed outside the classroom are ripe for use in large lectures. In the current paper we describe an integration of academic content with practices that support student engagement and success in a large general education course, Child Development. We begin with a brief description of the class, as it was before modification and as it is now. We then summarize some of the literature that describes evidenced-based methods of supporting at-risk students and explain how we have used this literature to inform our alignment of pedagogical practices with pedagogical goals. We share means of authentic assessment used in this course that target academic mastery and student well-being during and after the course’s completion. Throughout this discussion we report on early indications that our modifications have met our intended goals. We conclude by considering principles that might guide redesign of other large classes.
... Once leadership potential is assessed, mentoring relationships allow for a process of validation, orientation, and encouragement to take place. Mentoring is a process by which more experienced and knowledgeable individuals (mentors) act as guides, role models, teachers and supporters of less experienced individuals (mentees) (Luna & Prieto, 2012). Mentoring can help mentees develop a stronger sense of competence and identity, and can help them to cope with different stressors associated with their roles and responsibilities in life (Bordes & Arredondo, 2005). ...
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A primary goal of the social work profession is social justice advocacy for disenfranchised and oppressed communities such as the Latino community. In the context of this paper, leadership development for community emancipation relates to efforts that foster indigenous community leadership designed to procure political rights or equality for their disenfranchised or devalued populations. The paper reviews the literature on Latino/a leadership perspectives, leadership development trends, and best practices that serve as a compatible integrative Latino/a approach. The approach proposes that the process of Latino/a leadership development should be collective, culturally attuned, transformative, and community emancipatory. The authors present a model for students, alumni, and faculty that incorporates the approach through the use of three components: (1) Sustained institutional commitment, support, and resources; (2) Creation of leadership opportunities, mentoring, and modeling; and (3) Leadership efforts that foster community emancipation. The approach has been successfully employed for over 30 years in a Latino Project at a New England School of Social Work. Discussion of the model's components, a case scenario, considerations for replication of the approach, and future research will be offered.
... Mentoring, about which there are numerous researches (Luna & Prieto, 2009;Maxwell, 2009;Carter, 2008;Johnson, 2008;Hughes & Dykstra, 2008;Karcher, 2008;Morales, 2007;Allen, Eby & Lentz, 2006;White, 2006;Simmons, 2006;Wolfe, 2006;Bernier, Larose & Soucy, 2005;Karcher, 2005;Karcher, Davis & Powell, 2002;Beyene, Sanchez & Ballou, 2002) in the literature, has become a frequently mentioned educational application, and is thought to have a vital role in academic achivement. Galbraith and Maslin-Ostrowski (2000) defines a mentor as a person who monitors the development of a younger individual and provides psychological support by having the role of a teacher and consultant. ...
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The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of mentoring service on the resource management strategies of the students. The research group consisted of 42 students, attending Yıldız Technical University School of Foreign Languages, on whom pre-test post-test control group experimental design was used. The experimental group was provided with the mentoring service in addition to the foreign language instruction while the control group was not. Data collection tool, "Resource Management Strategies" dimension of the "Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSQL)", was applied to both groups before and after the experiment, and the results were analyzed via the analysis of covariance. Findings of the study indicated that the mentoring service had a significant effect on resource management strategies of the students.
... In the higher education literature, familism has been found to positively and negatively influence such factors as academic outcomes, enrollment in higher education, immersion in the college environment and college living arrangements for Hispanic students (Desmond & Turley, 2009;Fischer, 2007;Luna & Prieto, 2009;Tinto, 1993;Valenzuela & Dornbusch, 1994). These factors are critical to retention in higher education and therefore further research on familism is needed to better understand how to optimize Hispanic student retention. ...
... The mentored students reported increased confidence related to college success, greater levels of school belonging, and significantly higher levels of motivation for attending college. Luna and Prieto (2009) interviewed two Latino and two Latina undergraduates (three Mexican-Americans and one Salvadorian) in a pre-graduate school program and found that mentored students had greater selfempowerment, more connections with faculty and graduate students, and an improved understanding of graduate school. Overall, participation in the program helped these first-generation students demystify the graduate school process. ...
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Institutional disadvantages at every educational level for Latinos/as create a shortage of Latino/a professionals, which in turn creates a paucity of mentors for the fastest-growing student population. This review examines peer-reviewed literature focused on mentoring Latinos/as from Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) through professional settings, which is also known as the Pre-K to 20+ Pathway. Because of challenges in measuring program outcomes and the informal nature in which many mentoring relationships for Latinos/as take place, methodological limitations within the current Latino/a mentoring literature exist. Findings should be viewed with cautious optimism, but indeed as the foundation for establishing a more robust body of knowledge.
... Having been subject to a large number of researches (Luna, Prieto, 2009;Maxwell, 2009;Carter, 2008;Johnson, 2008;Hughes and Dykstra, 2008;Karcher, 2008;Morales, 2007;Allen, Eby, Lentz, 2006;White, 2006;Simmons, 2006;Wolfe, 2006;Bernier, Larose, Soucy, 2005;Karcher, 2005;Karcher, Davis, Powell, 2002;Beyene et al., 2002) and to many discussions in the recent years, mentoring is considered to have an important role in achievements of students and is often applied at schools to improve academic achievement. Within this context, the study examined the effect of a mentoring service, which will be developed and applied at Y ld z Technical University's School of Foreign Languages; on students' academic achievements and self-efficacy perceptions. ...
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In this study, the effect of the mentoring service on the academic achievements and self-efficacy perceptions of the students attending Yιldιz Technical University is examined. The research group consists of 42 students attending the School of Foreign Languages. For data collection, the school's English Proficiency Test points and “Self-efficacy Perception” sub-dimension of “Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSQL)” were used. Findings were analyzed via the analysis of covariance. Results of the study indicate that the mentoring service has no significant effect on students’ academic achievement and selfefficacy perceptions.
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This study employs an instrumental case study design to explore the environmental context of Latinx postdoctoral scholars in relation to their STEM identity and intended STEM career pathway. Interviews were conducted using an interactionist approach to STEM identity development. Deductive data analysis techniques reveal the impact of supervisor relationships on the work environment, the importance of fostering a mentoring atmosphere for others, and the value of seeking and creating safe and supportive spaces.
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Some assert that first-year college programs can foster increased engagement among college students and lead to successful outcomes, but there is a lack of in-depth analysis of students’ perceptions of their experiences in such programs. This qualitative study explores a small sample of young, Pell Grant-eligible Latino male students’ perceptions of their experiences and engagement in a first-year college program. The study revealed six main themes: 1) The sense of community within the program; 2) Appreciation for professor and advisors; 3) Engaging course content; 4) Appreciation of academic and financial supports; 5) Complicated perceptions of the racial dynamics in the program and on the campus at large; and 6) The long-term impact of the first-year program, which is comprised of two sub-themes: a) The program positively impacted some participants’ academic work ethic and study skills; and b) A sense of confidence developed within some participants as a result of the support they received in the program.
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This paper documents the processes and procedures followed by a team of two researchers and five co-researchers in the creation of sustainable learning environments at a school in the Free State province of South Africa. For this purpose, we used one school to illustrate how diverse school community members deliberately constructed a framework for the integration of ICT in the development of its professional curriculum leadership practices. A conceptual framework driven through critical emancipatory theory is applied as the lens that propels us to create opportunities for self-empowerment. Grounded on this theoretical framing we then used a participatory action research to operationalize it. We generated relevant data through the establishment of a research team, which coalesced around a common vision collectively identified in pursuance of the aim of study. Data generated were analysed using Van Dijk’s critical discourse analysis. The findings discussed are (i) performance through reflecting on professional curriculum practices, (ii) their actions, (iii) procedures involved therein, and (iv) strategies. The contribution we made was a tested framework for the integration of ICT in a professional curriculum context. This contribution has implications for the creation of a sustainable learning environment.
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This study provides insight into the factors that influence satisfaction with an Internet-based practitioner–student mentoring relationship that is part of an undergraduate business school curriculum. Practitioner mentors are especially important because they can help student protégés learn the skills needed for their professional development, encourage the formation of professional networks, and enhance the protégés’ satisfaction with their education. In this study, we examine a number of factors that can potentially influence satisfaction with the mentoring relationship, including the protégé’s networking to find a mentor, protégé trust in the mentor, protégé self-disclosure, the level of protégé understanding of the mentoring program’s objectives, and how effectively the mentor serves as a role model. Hypotheses were tested through a structural equation model. The results showed that mentoring relationship satisfaction was positively associated with networking to find a mentor, trust in the mentor, protégé self-disclosure, protégé understanding of the objectives of the mentoring program, and the degree to which the protégé viewed the mentor as a role model. In addition, mentor trust was positively associated with the level of protégé self-disclosure. Implications for theory and practice are discussed, and recommendations on how to strengthen satisfaction with practitioner–student mentoring relationships are provided.
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In the research and professional literature, there are at least four lines of inquiry around mentoring: perceptions of successful mentoring in general, mentoring of doctoral dissertations in particular, mentoring specific to the online environment, and relative importance of mentoring behaviors. In each case, particular qualities that make for successful mentoring are identified and described but not coalesced into a conceptual model of mentoring. In examining this literature, the authors identified 94 mentor behaviors and characteristics of effective mentors, which were reduced for redundancies to 55. These were clustered into a conceptual model of mentoring with two domains, academic and psychosocial with four attributes in the academic domain (competence, availability, induction, and challenge) and three in the psychosocial domain (personal qualities, communication, and emotional support). The two domains and seven attributes of this model are described and discussed, outlining some of the implications of this model for further research.
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This article discusses the development of Knowledge River, a program at the University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science established through several Institute of Museum and Library Services grants designed to recruit Latino and Native American students to the library and information science (LIS) profession. Knowledge River (KR) was designed as a national model for increasing diversity in information organizations and LIS programs. The article describes the KR model and elements of the program that have increased its success. Included are participation in a residential cohort, real-world library work experiences, and formal mentoring by KR graduates and other ethnic minorities in the field. Knowledge River has served as a catalyst for increasing awareness of diversity issues and multiple perspectives in addressing issues in the LIS field. Knowledge River has also resulted in a requirement that all LIS students enroll in at least one diversity course. This article also provides a retrospective analysis of the KR model and presents a theoretical framework for developing future LIS diversity programs such as KR.
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The purpose of this study was to understand the student-faculty mentoring process and how mentoring facilitates Latino students' adjustment to college. Thirty-two Latino students participating in a university Faculty Mentoring Program (FMP) were surveyed. The findings showed that (a) students experienced an increase in college self-efficacy and academic goal definition as a result of participating in the FMP; (b) students with same-ethnic mentors perceived them to be significantly more supportive in furthering their personal and career development and reported significantly greater program satisfaction than nonmatched students; and (c) frequency of student-mentor contact was positively correlated with students' adjustment to college, perceived mentor supportiveness, and program satisfaction.
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University undergraduates (84 women, 80 men: M age=19.1 years old) reported school mission and value perceptions, life and/or school mentor relationships, and social desirability tendencies. No significant social desirability effect was obtained. Prote´ge´s with mentors at school and in life (n=52) reported greater cognitive and informational support but equal rates of emotional and tangible support plus modeling of appropriate behaviors as prote´ge´s with mentors from life alone (n=55). Furthermore, prote´ge´s with a mentor in life and at school stated stronger perceptions of their institution's educational mission, a greater sense of campus altruism, and a commitment to lifelong engagement in education than prote´ge´s with mentors from life alone or students with no mentor (n=48). Implications for developing school‐based mentorship initiatives which augment life‐based mentor programs may enhance student understanding of a university's mission and its values are discussed.
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This article conceptualizes community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital. CRT shifts the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focuses on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged. Various forms of capital nurtured through cultural wealth include aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial and resistant capital. These forms of capital draw on the knowledges Students of Color bring with them from their homes and communities into the classroom. This CRT approach to education involves a commitment to develop schools that acknowledge the multiple strengths of Communities of Color in order to serve a larger purpose of struggle toward social and racial justice.
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Individual differences shape the needs and characteristics of protégés, the processes through which mentoring may influence protégés' developmental trajectories, and the social networks into which the mentors enter. The literature on the influences of gender, ethnicity, and age on mentoring is reviewed and discussed as examples of how mentoring programs may have different influences on, and outcomes for, specific groups of youth. A focus on individual differences will help facilitate the development of mentoring programs that create a close fit between the needs of protégés and the services offered by the programs, as well as greater insight into what are the key elements of program effectiveness. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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This study of the impact of doctoral adviser mentoring on student outcomes was undertaken in response to earlier research that found (a) students with greater incoming potential received more adviser mentoring, and (b) adviser mentoring did not significantly contribute to important student outcomes, including research productivity [Green, S. G., and Bauer, T. N. (1995). Personnel Psychology 48(3): 537–561]. In this longitudinal study spanning 5 1/2years, the effect of mentorship on the research productivity, career commitment, and self-efficacy of Ph.D. students in the ‘hard’ sciences was assessed, while controlling for indicators of ability and attitudes at program entry. Positive benefits of mentoring were found for subsequent productivity and self-efficacy. Mentoring was not significantly associated with commitment to a research career.
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Chicanas/os are part of the youngest, largest, and fastest growing racial/ethnic 'minority' population in the United States, yet at every schooling level, they suffer the lowest educational outcomes of any racial/ethnic group. Using a 'counterstorytelling' methodology, Tara Yosso debunks racialized myths that blame the victims for these unequal educational outcomes and redirects our focus toward historical patterns of institutional neglect. She artfully interweaves empirical data and theoretical arguments with engaging narratives that expose and analyse racism as it functions to limit access and opportunity for Chicana/o students. By humanising the need to transform our educational system, Yosso offers an accessible tool for teaching and learning about the problems and possibilities present along the Chicano/a educational pipeline.
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In this paper we describe a mentoring program targeted at undergraduate minority students interested in attending graduate school in the social sciences, which involves them in faculty-headed research projects. The program was developed to help minority students clarify their professional goals, to increase their research and technical skills (such as effective communication of ideas and findings), to foster close mentoring relationships with faculty members, and to help them apply and gain admittance into graduate training programs. We discuss the importance of structured mentoring programs in the professional socialization and development of minority and female social scientists, and make recommendations for prospective program planners.
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Despite a growing body of research about mentoring, definitional, theoretical, and methodological deficiencies reduce the usefulness of existing research. This article provides a critical review of the literature on mentoring, with an emphasis on the links between mentoring and undergraduate academic success. The first section describes a variety of ways in which mentoring has been defined within higher education, management, and psychology. Issues related to developing a standard operational definition of mentoring within higher education are discussed. The second section provides a critical review of empirical research about mentoring and undergraduate education. The third section describes four different theoretical perspectives that could be used in future research about mentoring. Finally, future directions for research, including methodological issues and substantive concerns, are addressed.
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This study focuses on college students of Latina/o heritage—one of the fastest growing college student groups, but with a slowly increasing graduation rate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between university-based mentoring experiences and Latina/o students’ perceived comfort in the university environment.
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Affirmative action is a necessary but not sufficient condition for diversifying graduate school. Increasing diversity requires us to capitalize on unintended consequences. Adopting the philosophy of intellectual entrepreneurship, although valuable to all students and disciplines, may have a special and perhaps more substantial impact on underrepresented minorities. The potential of intellectual entrepreneurship for increasing diversity inheres in its capacity to empower students to discover otherwise unobserved connections between academe and personal and professional commitments.
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Examined the effects of similarity, both actual (race and gender) and perceived, and amount of contact between mentor and protégé on the quality of mentor relationships. Ss were 104 16–22 yr old summer intern protégés and their volunteer staff mentors employed at a media organization. Protégés were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 types of mentor pairings, same and different race mentors. Mentor relationship quality was measured by liking, satisfaction, intended retention, and degree of psychosocial and instrumental functions experienced by the protégé. Results indicate that liking, satisfaction, and contact with mentor were higher when protégés perceived themselves to be more similar to their mentors. Actual race pairing was related to protégés' perceptions of the amount of career support and to mentors' liking of protégés. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Encouraging women students and faculty to aspire to leadership could be a common activity on most campuses.
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