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Asperger Syndrome and Academic Achievement

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This study focused on identifying the academic characteristics of children and youth Who have Asperger syndrome (AS). Significant numbers of school-age children have AS, yet little is knoWn about the unique educational features of individuals With this pervasive developmental disorder. TWenty-one children and youth With diagnoses of AS Were assessed using the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT; Psychological Corp., 1992), the Test of Problem Solving—Elementary, Revised (TOPS-R; Zachman, Barrett, Huisingh, Orman, & LoGiudice, 1994), and the Test of Problem Solving— Adolescent (TOPS-A; Zachman, Barrett, Huisingh, Orman, & Blagden, 1991). The study revealed the academic achievement, problem-solving, and critical thinking traits of school-age children and youth Who have AS. Results are discussed in the context of their implications for identifying and developing educational plans and strategies
... However, it is possible, if not likely, that these varying observations of learning abilities in autistic WoID individuals may exemplify the cognitive heterogeneity that is characteristic of autism (Kim, Macari, Koller, & Chawarska, 2016). If so the recognition and definition of these varying patterns may contribute to a basic understanding of the different needs of autistic WoID children in the classroom (Griswold, Barnhill, Smith Myles, Hagiwara, & Simpson, 2002). ...
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Background There has been an increase of autistic students without intellectual disabilities (autisticWoID) placed in general education settings (Hussar et al., 2020), but there is a lack of understanding of how to best support classroom learning for these children. Previous research has pointed to subgroups of autisticWoID children who display difficulty with mathematics and reading achievement (Chen et al., 2018; Estes et al., 2011; Jones et al., 2009; Wei et al., 2015). Research has primarily focused on symptomatology and communication factors related to learning in subgroups of autistic children. The current study sought to expand upon this research by assessing the validity of these previous studies and by investigating the specific contribution of domain-general cognitive abilities to differences in these subgroups. Method Seventy-eight autisticWoID individuals (M = 11.34 years, SD = 2.14) completed measures of mathematics and reading achievement, IQ, working memory, inferential thinking, and Theory of Mind (ToM). A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on the math and reading measures. Results The analysis revealed two unique achievement groups: one group that performed lower than expected on math and reading achievement and a second group that performed higher than expected. Groups differed significantly on IQ and working memory and were distinguished by performance on reading fluency. Groups did not differ on ToM, inferential thinking, or symptomatology. Conclusion These findings describe a group of autisticWoID individuals that may be more likely to experience difficulty learning, which should be accounted for in general education settings.
... According to the meta-analysis by Chiang and Lin (2007), most individuals aged 3-51 years with ASD or HFA have a significant math weakness. Moreover, the proportion of TD children with math difficulties is approximately 7% (Geary, 2011), while that proportion is 3 to 5.5 times higher in ASD children (Estes et al., 2011;Griswold et al., 2002;Jones et al., 2009;Oswald et al., 2016). Consistent with this result, ASD-without intellectual disability (ASD-WoID) students have significantly greater mathematics deficits than their TD peers Bullen et al., 2020;Chiang & Lin, 2007;Mayes & Calhoun, 2003). ...
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Research evaluating predictors of mathematics ability in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is scarce and inconclusive. The present study first compared the mathematics ability and cognitive abilities of preschoolers with ASD and age-matched typically developing (TD) peers. Then, we examined the relative contributions of cognitive abilities to the mathematics ability of preschoolers with ASD and TD. The results show that compared to those of their age-matched TD peers, the mathematics and cognitive abilities of preschoolers with ASD were impaired. The predictors of mathematics ability were found to differ among preschoolers with ASD and their age-matched TD peers. For TD preschoolers, the domain-specific approximate number system (ANS) was the key predictor of mathematics ability. For preschoolers with ASD, domain-general working memory (WM) was most important.
... Sur le plan scolaire, plusieurs étudiants ayant un TSA présentent des problèmes dans des tâches de compréhension verbale ou écrite (Griswold et al., 2002). Des difficultés d'intégration de l'information écrite, un manque d'inférences, des déficits dans la communication et dans la théorie de l'esprit expliquent, du moins en partie, ces lacunes de compréhension (Williamson et al., 2012). ...
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Currently of increasing interest to other professionals, the Asperger syndrome label has yet to achieve widespread currency amongst EPs. Despite the often well‐founded arguments against the use of a medical and diagnostic model in our work, this article makes the case for the usefulness of the Asperger concept in helping to plan for the curricular and social needs of a small but often misunderstood group of children.
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