Article

Factors Influencing Individual Recycling Behavior in Office Settings A Study of Office Workers in Taiwan

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
Environment and Behavior (Impact Factor: 1.27). 05/1995; 27(3):380-403. DOI: 10.1177/0013916595273006
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ABSTRACT

This study explores office recycling behavior and its antecedents through a survey administered to 1,788 workers in Taipei, Taiwan. The instrument measured household and office recycling behavior, commitment to and motives for recycling, and the convenience of carrying out recycling in their office settings. Prior experience was shown to be an excellent predictor of office-based conservation behavior. However, to be effective, prior experience must be of the same specificity as the office behavior being predicted. Thus prior experience with general household recycling was effective at predicting general office recycling behavior, but was unable to predict more specific recycling behavior. Likewise, prior experience with a particular material—In this instance paper—predicted office conservation behavior with respect to that material alone. Organizational commitment and individual commitment were found to be modest predictors of office-based conservation behavior, although economic motivation was not found to be a particularly effective predictor of such behavior. Implications for office-based recycling programs are discussed.

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    • "Although there has been little research on what people do in the workplace in order to protect the environment, some studies indicate that employees may engage in pro-environmental behavior in different ways. For example, they may seek to avoid waste and recycle paper (e.g., Lee et al. 1995). In this case, pro-environmental behaviors at work involve gestures related to personal rather than organizational values. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015
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    • "Although there has been little research on what people do in the workplace in order to protect the environment, some studies indicate that employees may engage in pro-environmental behavior in different ways. For example, they may seek to avoid waste and recycle paper (e.g., Lee et al. 1995). In this case, pro-environmental behaviors at work involve gestures related to personal rather than organizational values. "
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Business Ethics
    • "From the limited studies that have examined this aspect, Vinning and Ebreo (2002) report mixed findings and suggest that one pro-environmental behavior may inhibit other types of pro-environmental behavior (see also Thogersen 1999). In addition, Lee et al. (1995) find that recycling one material does not lead to other recycling and waste management behaviors. However, other studies report a spillover or carryover effect (Vinning and Ebreo 2002) among types of pro-environmental behaviors (Reams et al. 1996). "
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