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Immigrating, Assimilating, Cashing In? Analyzing Property Values in Suburbs of Immigrant Gateways

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Abstract

Assets like properties determine opportunities. Many immigrants have begun to bypass cities and move straight to suburbs. Until the recent house price crash, suburbs had been perceived as locations where appreciation rates were high, but this perception might no longer hold true. Not many studies have focused on suburban house prices with regard to race, ethnicity, and nativity. This study fills the gap in terms of nativity. This study uses data from the 2000 US Census and the 2005-2009 American Community Survey to perform regression analyses to analyze immigrant gateways as delineated by Singer (2008) with regard to median values of owner-occupied housing units and the factors that influence median values, while also differentiating between inner cities and suburbs. Results show that there are differences in terms of values and appreciation rates among suburbs of immigrant gateways, indicating different economic integration patterns.

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... The proportion of non-Hispanic Asians, on the other hand, was higher in the developing suburbs than in mature ones. This may reflect somewhat different mobility patterns among racial/ethnic subgroups with high immigration rates (Anacker, 2013;Clark, 2003;Jones, 2008;Li & Skop, 2007;Massey & Denton, 1988a, 1988b, Zhou & Gatewood, 2007. ...
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Within the Caribbean region, racial identity forms a multicategory continuum from white to black, whereas in the United States it is a dichotomy of black versus white. Many Caribbean Hispanics, therefore, reject a strict racial dichotomy and select some category intermediate between black and white when asked to identify themselves racially on the US Census. Using 1970 and 1980 census tract data, we show that these people display a low degree of segregation from white Hispanics and a high degree of segregation from both black Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks. They are highly segregated from Anglos, however, suggesting that people of mixed racial ancestry are accepted by white Hispanics on the basis of shared ethnicity but are rejected by Anglos on the basis of race. Although both race and ethnicity remain potent factors in American life, results underscore the special salience of race in US society. -from Authors
Article
Processes of Hispanic and black spatial assimilation were examined in selected SMSAs in the southwestern United States using 1960 and 1970 census data. Residential succession was much less prevalent in Hispanic areas than in black areas, and established Hispanic areas were quite rare. However, for both groups average SES fell as areas underwent transition from Anglo to established minority areas. The main difference between Hispanic and black areas was that invasion was followed by succession in less than 50% of cases. Whether tracts lost or gained Anglos following invasion by Hispanics dependend on the objective characteristics of the invaders and the location of the tract relative to established minority areas. Overall, blacks were much less able to translate status attainments into mobility out of the ghetto and into contact with Anglos. Path models of Hispanic and black spatial assimilation revealed structural differences in processes between the two groups. Given the same socioeconomic inputs,the ultimate probability of residential contact with Anglos was much lower for blacks than for Hispanics. Results contradict the view that race is declining in importance within U.S. society.