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Description of the larva and pupa of Nasiternella regia Riedel, 1914 (Diptera: Pediciidae) from Slovakia, with notes on ecology and behaviour

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  • Slezské zemské muzeum, Opava, Czech Republic

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The previously unknown larvae and pupae of Nasiternella regia Riedel, 1914 (Diptera, Pediciidae) are described and illustrated from specimens collected in water-filled tree holes in deciduous forests in Slovakia. Brief comments on their ecology and behaviour are provided. Comparisons are made to the larvae of Nasiternella varinervis (Zetterstedt, 1851) as described by Krivosheina (2009).
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