Conference Paper

Visual Design: The Effect of Mere-Exposure in Different UX Phases

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Abstract

To increase the understanding of the highly complex phenomenon of long-term user experience (UX), we investigated the effect of mere-exposure and its influence on the evaluation of UX in different phases, e.g. pre-use, use, post-use and retrospectively after one week. A mere-exposure effect on the evaluation of beauty in a pre-use situation could be already detected in a former experiment by Vogel. In the present experiment two different graphic designs of a mobile application´s user interface were tested. Visual attractiveness was manipulated to investigate a two-folded exposure effect. Pragmatic, hedonic product qualities and attractiveness as well as an overall liking have been assessed repeatedly. To conclude we could identify dynamics of UX. Additionally, UX phases differ also in influencing factors based on the varying importance of UX components. But the mere-exposure of interfaces in a pre-use situation does not have an influence on the evaluation and UX of the same interfaces in the following UX phases.

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Hassenzahl,M. (2005). Interaktive Produkte wahrnehmen, erleben, bewerten und gestalten. In: M. Eibl, H. Reiterer, P. F. Stephan, & F. Thissen (Hrsg.), Knowledge Media Design -Grundlagen und Perspektiven einer neuen Gestaltungsdisziplin, 151-171, München: Oldenbourg.
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