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The current study compared the effects of open versus closed group dynamics on perceived consensus, objective consensus, and perceived efficacy of collaborative learning in participants high and low in dispositional trust in the context of an Interactive Management (IM) session. Interactive management is a computer-mediated collaborative tool designed to enhance group problem-solving by facilitating cooperative inquiry and consensus. In the current study, two groups of 15 undergraduate psychology students (N = 30) came together to structure the interdependencies between positive and negative aspects of social media. After screening for trust scores, participants high and low on dispositional trust were randomly assigned to either an open or closed voting condition. The closed voting group were not permitted to discuss the problem relations, but consensus votes were recorded by the group design facilitator. The open group were allowed to discuss the relations before voting. Results indicated that those in the open-voting group, and those in the high dispositional trust group, scored significantly higher on perceived consensus and perceived efficacy of the tool itself. Results are discussed in light of theory and research on collaborative learning.
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... In online collaborative learning, the learner-centered instructions were important for collaborative trust building from the perspective of cognition and affection (Tseng et al., 2015). But those who are critical of the use of online tools see online learning as anti-social, which inhibits the trust building process for the mechanical nature of online courses (Harney et al., 2012). Sometimes it is also challenging to build trust in the collaborative learning environment because 693 Individual trust and school performance the cohesiveness is difficult to build in virtual settings (Tseng and Yeh, 2013). ...
... Additionally, we measured individual trust development relating to school performance in a semi-virtual collaboration environment, removing the limitations of previous research (Cheng, Nolan and Macaulay, 2013). Compared with previous research on blended course, the flexible nature of semi-virtual environments is again proven to be helpful for trust maintenance (Owston et al., 2013;Harney et al., 2012). ...
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Purpose This study investigates the relationship between individual trust of students in computer supported semi-virtual collaboration groups and student’s performance in school. Design/methodology/approach Longitudinal questionnaires and interviews are conducted during the case study. By analyzing the data from the questionnaires and the grade earned by the students, the sample students are ranked with respect to the trust level and individual performance. Furthermore, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test is used to compare individual trust level and performance in the computer supported semi-virtual collaborative environment. Findings The distribution of an individual’s trust level is roughly consistent with the distribution of the individual’s performance in the collaboration. Besides, the relationship between a student’s trust level and the student’s performance is positively correlated. Research limitations/implications This study integrates the issues of trust, school performance, and collaboration in an educational context. Furthermore, the conclusions drawn from this paper extend the literature of multiple disciplines including education, management, and psychology. Practical implications The conclusions could apply in the fields of education and management since the analysis revealed the relationship between an individual’s trust level and their performance. Originality/value This study contributes to the field of trust and collaboration research with a link to trust development and performance. The study also provides an insight into how to successfully improve the performance of student semi-virtual collaboration groups.
... This is the case of most European universities, where the implementation of the agreements of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) has fostered the introduction of group-oriented teaching methods, such as collaborative learning. Collaborative learning is an educational approach that involves small groups of students working together to find solutions to problems, discuss concepts, create new products/services in simulated situations, or complete group assignments (Harney et al., 2012). ...
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... We may learn to use various tools that help us to structure and communicate our thinking and reasoning, for example, argument mapping tools (Dwyer et al., 2010(Dwyer et al., , 2012. Part of the challenge in facilitating CI involves making the private world public, in a way that supports group problem solving (Harney et al., 2012. A CI facilitator, similar to a teacher (Hogan & Broome, 2020a, 2020b, is aware that the private I-World of every group member is vast, including countless feelings, memories, ideas, and organised bodies of knowledge, some of which may be relevant to a specific problem solving task. ...
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... Empirical studies continued to support the positive association between collaborative learning and students' development of interest, critical thinking and learning outcomes (Chu, Tse, Loh, & Chow, 2011;Harney, Hogan, & Broome, 2012;Inayat, Salim, Amin, & Inayat, 2013). Therefore, the notion of collaborative learning is now widely embraced and is irreversibly incorporated by educators in online learning environment. ...
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