Abstract

Nurses and other health professionals are adopting social media to network with health care professionals and organizations, support health education, deliver health promotion messages, enhance professional development and employment opportunities, and communicate within political forums. This paper explores the growing use of social media, and examines the current dynamics of Twitter as an example of the uptake of social media. This paper also offers practical guidance for new Twitter users who are interested in using this social media approach in clinical or educational settings, and for professional development.
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... Many health professionals, including mental health nurses, have joined that conversation. There are numerous examples where nurses have found Twitter to be a useful way to communicate with each other, undertake self-directed learning, and to share information and resources (Bell 2017;Morley & Chinn 2014;Smith & Watson 2016;Usher et al. 2014;Wilson et al. 2014). Twitter, along with other social media platforms, has also been used as a health education teaching tool in some instances (Ferguson et al. 2014;Gree et al. 2014;Lopez & Cleary 2018). ...
... Twitter, along with other social media platforms, has also been used as a health education teaching tool in some instances (Ferguson et al. 2014;Gree et al. 2014;Lopez & Cleary 2018). Although there remains some resistance to uptake, scholarly use of social media has spontaneously emerged amongst many health professions, and is broadly seen as a legitimate way for academics, clinicians, scientists, and the general public to share information and communicate with each other (Smith & Watson 2016;Thelwall 2014;Wilson et al. 2014). ...
... With the emergence of social media, many health professionals have embraced platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, and LinkedIn to network with peers and organizations, undertake and share professional development education and resources, facilitate and amplify health promotion activities, and participate in 'the public conversation' (Bell 2017;Francis et al. 2018;Wilson et al. 2014). Since July 2014, Wiley, the company that publishes IJMHN, has partnered with a company called Altmetric (a contraction of 'alternative metrics') to track the online attention and activity each of its journals (Wiley, 2014). ...
... Similarly, telenursing such as in [22,25] is used for collaboration between healthcare providers in treating remote patients. Different computer applications and communication networks such as [23,24,27,30,[33][34][35] are used for collaboration and information sharing. ...
... A descriptive study [33] conducted in 2013 in Australia describes the use of Twitter and its role in developing a professional digital health network. The study highlights the benefits of social media and provides guidance for those who have been reluctant to use social media. ...
Article
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Networking provides access to countless opportunities for nurses and patients and allows them to communicate, interact and collaborate with each other in order to enhance nursing care practice and improve health. The ubiquity of information and communication technologies have the potential to improve access to both health information and services in health care. The authors aim for this study is to investigate the role of networking tools in shaping and improving nursing care practices. An integrative review was conducted and electronic databases of PubMed, Cochrane, Science Direct and ACM Digital Library were searched for studies published between 1985 and 2015. Sixteen articles, based on the use of networking tools in nursing care practice, were included in the review. Data synthesis consists of writing descriptive summaries and thematic analysis of the key findings in the included articles. Different networking tools are currently used by nursing professionals for patient's safety and well-being. These include information technology, telehealth nursing, IT and networking applications, social media networks, miscellaneous interaction networks, internet as a source of information and communication networks. Networking assist healthcare professionals with completing their daily tasks such as teaching patients, monitoring their health, tracking their blood pressure and much more. A variety of networking tools are available for managing chronic disease, diet, and lifestyle choices of patients. However, privacy, security and reliability of exchanged information is extremely important in improving the quality of patient care.
... Students using Twitter also have a unique opportunity to learn from leaders in their field and to keep up with the increasingly fast pace of change in their discipline. 2 The impact of research ultimately depends on how well it has been disseminated to the end user. 3 Traditionally, research dissemination has relied on the end user searching or "pulling" research from the relevant databases, while social media "pushes" research directly towards the end user by platforms such as Twitter. ...
... Supplementing the impact of publications to a wider audience using social media tools should be considered to aid the dissemination of findings and research work to a range of stakeholders such as consumers, carers and healthcare professionals (Eysenbach, 2011;Schnitzler, Davies, Ross, & Harris, 2016). Wilson (2014) advocate the effective use of Twitter for the discussion and dissemination of research, due to the speed and potential spread of information. With approximately 80% of research evidence never reaching the clinicians delivering actual patient care, social media may help the translation of new research findings into clinical practice (Maloney et al., 2015). ...
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The internet and social media have changed the way society communicates, requiring the nursing workforce to develop effective digital literacy skills and attain levels of e-professionalism. The internet provides a unique environment that both connects and disrupts with powerful and unpredictable consequences for healthcare. A networked nursing workforce can influence and create collaborative communities of practice that will develop and shape healthcare. Nurse education must engage with technology and social media to provide a future ready workforce capable of delivering future eHealth reforms. Impact Statement This discussion paper focuses on the impact of social media and the challenges that the nursing profession will face with the disruption of technology driven healthcare. The future of healthcare will require a nursing workforce which is technologically trained and who possess the digital skills to deliver personalised and evidence-based interventions. Social media is creating new communities of practice across healthcare where professionals and consumers can interact. Nursing needs to ensure they are at the forefront of this communication revolution.
... Laranjo et al., [19] tested to prove a positive effect of social networking sites interventions on health related outcomes, which was statistically confirmed. In [20], Evidence from the author's research shows that Facebook has been integrated into medical education. While the study in [21] proved that nurses use twitter to network with healthcare professionals and organizations, communicate and deliver health messages. ...
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Access to standard and economical health care delivery, availability of significant health information are viewed as some of the most functional public health interventions in present-day history. Despite that, current information obtained from the WHO regarding Nigeria’s health condition shows that the average existence expectancy is at 54 years and maternal mortality at 608 per 100,000 live births as a result of poor health care services. Several aspects of health informatics have been applied to solve these challenges such as the transformation of records from manual to electronic. Among these are the telemedicine and socialized healthcare, which have been barely adopted in developing nations. This work thus proposes an architectural framework for a cloud-supported socialized healthcare system. In order to achieve this; a webbased application software was designed and implemented through the use of cloud computing technology platforms and server side scripting tools. This study proves that socialized healthcare will really go a long way in defeating barriers of viable human access and delivery.
... Representatives provided examples where inappropriate behaviour resulted in the 'banning' of mobile technology at the workplace and anecdotal evidence of previous inappropriate behaviour of health professionals [20,49,50] has shaped the current situation. Interviewees justified the inequity of access by claiming adverse media attention was responsible [20,51,52]. Participants mentioned cyberloafing and unprofessional behaviour such as using social media while at the workplace contributed to the inability to use mobile technology [53,54]. ...
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Background Access to, and use of, mobile or portable devices for learning at point of care within Australian healthcare environments is poorly governed. An absence of clear direction at systems, organisation and individual levels has created a mobile learning paradox, whereby although nurses understand the benefits of seeking and retrieving discipline or patient-related knowledge and information in real-time, mobile learning is not an explicitly sanctioned nursing activity. The purpose of this study was to understand the factors influencing mobile learning policy development from the perspective of professional nursing organisations. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were undertaken with representatives from professional nursing organisations in December 2016 and January 2017. Recruitment was by email and telephone. Qualitative analysis was conducted to identify the key themes latent in the transcribed data. Results Risk management, perceived use of mobile technology, connectivity to information and real-time access were key themes that emerged from the analysis, collectively identifying the complexity of innovating within an established paradigm. Despite understanding the benefits and risks associated with using mobile technology at point of care, nursing representatives were reluctant to exert agency and challenge traditional work patterns to alter the status quo. Conclusions The themes highlighted the complexity of accessing and using mobile technology for informal learning and continuing professional development. Mobile learning cannot occur at point of care until the factors identified are addressed. Additionally, a reluctance by nurses within professional organisations to advance protocols to govern digital professionalism needs to be overcome. For mobile learning to be perceived as a legitimate nursing function requires a more wholistic approach to risk management that includes all stakeholders, at all levels. The goal should be to develop revised protocols that establish a better balance between the costs and benefits of access to information technology in real-time by nurses.
... Professional profiles are increasingly being used to curate professional online identities, which can then be followed by patients, colleagues, and potential employers (Wilson et al., 2014). Fenwick (2014) challenged health professionals to consider whether unprofessional behaviors were the consequence of social media or the result of existing problems made visible via social media. ...
Article
Background Although misuse of social networking sites, particularly Twitter, has occurred, little is known about the prevalence, content, and characteristics of uncivil tweets posted by nurses and nursing students. Objective The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tweets posted by nurses and nursing students on Twitter with a focus on cyberincivility. Method A cross-sectional, data-mining study was held from February through April 2017. Using a data-mining tool, we extracted quantitative and qualitative data from a sample of 163 self-identified nurses and nursing students on Twitter. The analysis of 8934 tweets was performed by a combination of SAS 9.4 for descriptive and inferential statistics including logistic regression and NVivo 11 to derive descriptive patterns of unstructured textual data. Findings We categorized 413 tweets (4.62%, n = 8934) as uncivil. Of these, 240 (58%) were related to nursing and the other 173 (42%) to personal life. Of the 163 unique users, 60 (36.8%) generated those 413 uncivil posts, tweeting inappropriately at least once over a period of six weeks. Most uncivil tweets contained profanity (n = 135, 32.7%), sexually explicit or suggestive material (n = 37, 9.0%), name-calling (n = 14, 3.4%), and discriminatory remarks against minorities (n = 9, 2.2%). Other uncivil content included product promotion, demeaning comments toward patients, aggression toward health professionals, and HIPAA violations. Conclusion Nurses and nursing students share uncivil tweets that could tarnish the image of the profession and violate codes of ethics. Individual, interpersonal, and institutional efforts should be made to foster a culture of cybercivility.
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Part of the Understanding Public Health series, this bestselling book is the leading text in the field. It focuses on how health policy is made nationally and globally, clearly explaining the key concepts from political science with a wide array of engaging examples. This edition is fully updated to reflect new research and ways of thinking about the health policy process. Written by leading experts, this clear and accessible book addresses the "how" of health policy making in a range of international settings. The book provides an accessible approach to understanding: Health policy analysis Power and policy making Public and private sector Agenda setting Government roles in policy Interest groups and policy Policy implementation Globalization and policy process Policy research and evaluation Doing policy analysis Making Health Policy 2nd edition is an ideal resource for students of public health and health policy, public health practitioners and policy makers.
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