Article

Sustainability: I know It When I See It

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Abstract

Anyone trying to communicate and implement sustainable practices quickly runs into definitional difficulties, which translate into operational difficulties. Simply put, sustainability, and its predecessor term, sustainable development, mean different things to different people. How can we hope to achieve a shared vision when we're not certain what vision we are sharing? This is not simply a rhetorical question — businesses and other organizations require measurable, manageable objectives to achieve progress in this area of endeavor.The challenge of defining sustainability has already been noted by a number of writers. The most common definition, “development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” first appeared in the World Commission on Environment and Development's report, Our Common Future (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), but there are many, many more definitions and interpretations.This note takes a different approach. Rather than seeking or proposing yet another definition of sustainability, it uses Wordle, a web-based data visualization tool, to generate a “tag cloud” of the common elements in over one hundred previously-published definitions. The result is a visually-appealing menage of terms providing a composite picture of the essence of sustainability.

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... Sustainability balances the economy, society, and environment with "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" as cited in the Brundtland Report 1) . Research acknowledges there is no collective definition of sustainability, and it is difficult to reach a consensus on the definition since the term is defined based on what is desirable, convenient, and measurable for the user groups 2,3) . This implies there can be many definitions of sustainability, and this idea is not necessarily wrong. ...
... This definition implies that sustainability creates a balance with the economy, society, and environment as the triple bottom line. While this definition has persisted, its longevity is not without criticisms 2,[4][5][7][8] . Research pointed out weaknesses in the sustainable development definition; it can include developed and developing countries, but at the same time difficult to measure and operationalize 2,4) . ...
... While this definition has persisted, its longevity is not without criticisms 2,[4][5][7][8] . Research pointed out weaknesses in the sustainable development definition; it can include developed and developing countries, but at the same time difficult to measure and operationalize 2,4) . ...
Article
Sustainability balances the economy, society, and environment with “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” as cited in the Brundtland Report. Research acknowledges there is no single definition of 'sustainability, and it is challenging to have it since the term is defined based on what is desirable, convenient, and measurable for the user group. This reasoning suggests there can be many definitions of sustainability, and this idea is not necessarily wrong. The concept of sustainability can and should be adapted to the local situation. Research also suggests differences in capacities of developing countries, which adds value to studying the case of developing countries. This case study is focused on a conceptual framework to define and apply environmentally sustainable transportation (EST) to local public transport route planning in the Philippines. This research explores how EST can be applied to existing land-use and transport planning policies and clarifies its role in developing countries. The paper has two parts: first, it discusses the theory and concept of sustainability. Second, the methodology for creating a conceptual framework of EST is presented and the resulting images are explained with how they can be linked to the local public transport planning policy. This research resulted in three images that show a way to define sustainable transport in the Philippines. The first image suggests a modification in the triple bottom line model by including resilience and institutional capacity. The second image clarifies elements of sustainable transportation and prioritizes safety as an essential factor that public transport systems should give more importance to. Lastly, the third image illustrates the linkages of EST with the Public Transport Modernization Program, which includes the policy on local public transport route planning. It also clarifies that EST thematic areas are related to the components of the Public Transport Modernization Program.
... The typical definition of sustainability comes from the Brundtland Report (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), "meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs," however, many other definitions exist (White, 2013). To limit our study to subject matters common across geography, sustainability, and metacoupling, we combined the major themes from the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (Messerli, 2018), the key elements for promoting sustainability (Fu et al., 2022), and the Telecoupling Toolbox (Tonini and Liu, 2017). ...
... Next, we defined which sustainability approaches we would compare throughout our study. Sustainability can be a somewhat vague and hard-to-define field (White, 2013). To bound our study, we combined the main themes from the "key elements for promoting sustainability" (Fu et al., 2022), the Telecoupling Toolbox (Tonini and Liu, 2017), and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (Messerli, 2018) to seven prominent topics in sustainability. ...
Article
Complex sustainability issues in the Anthropocene, with rapid globalization and global environmental changes, are increasingly interlinked between not only nearby systems, but also distant systems. Tobler's first law of geography (TFL) states “near things are more related than distant things.” Evidence suggests that TFL is not infallible for sustainability issues. Recently, the integrated framework of metacoupling (human-nature interactions within as well as between adjacent and distant systems, MCF) has been applied to analyze the interactions between nearby and distant coupled human and natural systems simultaneously. However, previous work has been scattered and fragmented. It is crucial to understand the extent to which TFL and MCF apply across pressing issues in sustainability. Therefore, we reviewed and synthesized sustainability literature that had used TFL and MCF across seven major topics: land change, species migration, tourism, trade, agricultural development, conservation, and governance. Results indicate that the literature using MCF generally did not or likely did not obey TFL, especially in trade, governance, and agricultural development. In the TFL literature, most topics obeyed TFL, except for species migration and trade. The findings suggest the need to rethink and further test TFL's relevance to sustainability issues, and highlight the potential of MCF to address complex interactions between both adjacent and distant systems across the world for global sustainability.
... Planning for a sustainable future is important so a clear understanding of it is needed (Toman, 2010). As noted by White (2013), the lack of consensus around the concept of sustainability may lead to operational difficulties and begs the question, "How can we hope to achieve a shared vision when we're not certain what vision we are sharing?" (p. ...
... Despite calls for action over the past two decades, substantial progress is needed to reach existing global sustainability goals (IPCC, 2022;United Nations Development Programme, 2021). While the lack of progress can be attributed to many different factors, some scholars suggest the vagueness of sustainability as a concept has played a role in the lack of progress (Johnston et al., 2007;White 2013). Along with vagueness, overuse of the term across sectors has made sustainability a buzzword, thus further widening the scope of its meaning (Leal Filho, 2000). ...
... This definition was sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (WCED, 1987). This definition has since become one of the most popular definitions of sustainable development used globally (White, 2013), it has influenced governments and organisations worldwide to incorporate the twin concepts of human and environmental wellbeing into their own policies. Indeed, the idea of current generations considering their impacts on future generations was also echoed in the UK government's view of sustainable development in 1994 Most societies want to achieve economic development to secure higher standards of living, now and fir future generations. ...
... Even beyond the purely national context, it is important to consider the wider role of sustainability to provide an improvement in living standards for the whole of the earth's population, yet remaining within the capacity of the earth to sustain those improvements (IUCN et al., 1991). Whilst there are criticisms that even development as well as growth cannot be infinitely sustainable (White, 2013), other authors have noted that what is considered to be sustainable can change over time as new practices and organisations evolve to take advantage of new opportunities and technologies whilst old ones decline or are superseded. This evolution has occurred throughout both the natural world as new species has evolved and the human-derived world as ailing industries are taken over by new ways of working or technologies (Voinov & Farley, 2007). ...
... This definition was sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (WCED, 1987). This definition has since become one of the most popular definitions of sustainable development used globally (White, 2013), it has influenced governments and organisations worldwide to incorporate the twin concepts of human and environmental wellbeing into their own policies. Indeed, the idea of current generations considering their impacts on future generations was also echoed in the UK government's view of sustainable development in 1994 Most societies want to achieve economic development to secure higher standards of living, now and fir future generations. ...
... Even beyond the purely national context, it is important to consider the wider role of sustainability to provide an improvement in living standards for the whole of the earth's population, yet remaining within the capacity of the earth to sustain those improvements (IUCN et al., 1991). Whilst there are criticisms that even development as well as growth cannot be infinitely sustainable (White, 2013), other authors have noted that what is considered to be sustainable can change over time as new practices and organisations evolve to take advantage of new opportunities and technologies whilst old ones decline or are superseded. This evolution has occurred throughout both the natural world as new species has evolved and the human-derived world as ailing industries are taken over by new ways of working or technologies (Voinov & Farley, 2007). ...
Article
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There is apparent lack of consensus among researchers as to the effect of sustainability accounting on market based performance. This is because previous studies have not presented a definite result about the direction of the outcome of the two constructs. To address this obvious gap and other social, environmental and economic issues, the researcher investigated empirically the effect of sustainability accounting practices on the market based performance of quoted manufacturing companies in Nigeria. The data for the study was collected from the Nigerian Stock Exchange, 2012 to 2019 using the principle of Apply and Explain guiding sustainability reporting of the Nigerian Code of Corporate Governance, 2018 and was analyzed using regression for the panel data. The study found that social, environmental and economic accountability have a positive but insignificant effect on the earnings per share. The study concluded that there is the tendency that if the tenets of sustainability accounting is dutifully followed, especially now that there is global concern about the impact of human activities on the environment and the future generation, there will be improvement in the market performance of these firms particularly in the long run. Therefore, it is recommended that manufacturing companies should contribute to the overall wellbeing of the people, planet, economy and business in a sustainable manner.
... It has been difficult to provide a clear definition of the term "sustainability." Many authors claimed that the term has been used to mean different things or grossly misinterpreted, wrongly applied, overexaggerated or used ambiguously (Costanza & Patten, 1995;Keiner, 2006;Kuhlman & Farrington, 2010;Salas-Zapata & Ortiz-Muñoz, 2019;Scoones, 2007;White, 2013). Although there is a common notion that the study of sustainability revolves around three factors which include social, economic and environmental goals or the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) (Purvis, 2019), the term connotes broader interdisciplinary application or interpretation (Schoolman et al. 2012). ...
... Nevertheless, analysis of words and phrases associated with sustainability reveals a possible scope of closest description of the term. For instance, White (2013) reports that words such as environment, economic, human, community, development, etc, are among top 25 words/phrases used in the definition of sustainability. ...
Article
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For over 50 years, the subject of sustainability has continually evolved and has been integrated into many disciplines of scientific inquiry. However, the practice of sustainability has been part of ancient histories of different tribes of the world under different forms (Kuhlman & Farrington, 2010). It has been difficult to provide a clear definition of the term “sustainability.” Many authors claimed that the term has been used to mean different things or grossly misinterpreted, wrongly applied, overexaggerated or used ambiguously (Costanza & Patten, 1995; Keiner, 2006; Kuhlman & Farrington, 2010; Salas-Zapata & Ortiz-Muñoz, 2019; Scoones, 2007; White, 2013). Although there is a common notion that the study of sustainability revolves around three factors which include social, economic and environmental goals or the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) (Purvis, 2019), the term connotes broader interdisciplinary application or interpretation (Schoolman et al. 2012). For this reason, sustainability can mean different things in different research disciplines. Nevertheless, analysis of words and phrases associated with sustainability reveals a possible scope of closest description of the term. For instance, White (2013) reports that words such as environment, economic, human, community, development, etc, are among top 25 words/phrases used in the definition of sustainability.
... Many authors have discussed the difculty of dening sustainability. Having identied more than 100 denitions, White (2013) suggests that the concept is open for different interpretations. For some, the existence of multiple denitions is a source of confusion (Glavic & Lukman, 2007). ...
... Looking at sustainability from the perspective of its widely agreed features is also useful to get a better understanding of this concept. Accordingly, sustainability is a comprehensive, future-oriented, and intergenerational concept that encompasses and balances economic, social, and ecological aspects of development (Dale & Newman, 2005b;Lumley & Armstrong, 2004;Vos, 2007;White, 2013). ...
Thesis
Humanity is facing environmental, social, and economic challenges, including climate change, inequality, and poverty. Different initiatives, such as the sustainable development goals (SDGs) of the United Nations and the Paris Agreement are introduced to deal with these challenges. Furthermore, several researchers conducted studies to identify sustainability competencies (SCs), i.e., integrated knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to contribute to a more sustainable future. These studies are typically conducted based on Western worldviews. As a result, the existing SC frameworks are not comprehensive enough to include non-Western worldviews, contexts, and related indigenous knowledge (IK). This dissertation argues that sustainability challenges are complex, and that the collaboration of several stakeholders and the use of diverse worldviews are required to address them. For sustainability challenges to be effectively addressed at the global level, integrating non-Western perspectives in the development of SCs is essential. The 2021 UNESCO report ‘Reimagining our futures together: A new social contract for education’ strongly advocates the inclusion of IK in education worldwide. The dissertation articulated the SCs that are specifically needed in this respect and assessed teaching methods by which they can be developed in higher education. The studies in this dissertation focused on identifying competencies that facilitate efforts toward a more sustainable future and exploring different means of fostering these competencies. Accordingly, the first study identified SCs for the Ethiopian context, as a country with different socioeconomic characteristics than Western contexts. The other studies focus on fostering SCs of higher education students, future sustainability change agents. These studies explored the potential contributions of using IK with modern education in Ethiopia. The studies also proposed education design principles of integrating IK with modern higher education systems. One of the studies on enhancing SCs explored the contributions of multiple learning approaches in a real-world environment to fostering the systems thinking competence of learners. The findings of this dissertation contribute to theoretical discourses on sustainable development, competence, SCs, education for sustainable development, the constructivist learning literature, and IK. The findings also have societal implications related to the SDGs, education and training in sustainable development, the role of stakeholders, including policymakers, teachers, and students. Keywords: sustainable development; sustainability; indigenous knowledge; education for sustainable development; sustainability competencies; education for sustainability; ESD; competencies; Ethiopia; base of the pyramid; sustainability competence; corporate social responsibility; systems thinking; mobile learning; real-world learning; field trips; learning approaches; education design principles; Delphi; exploratory experimental design; focus group.
... Indeed, the title of White's article "Sustainability: I know it when I see it", is a play on a much earlier court judgment where the court was trying to determine whether a publication was pornographic. White's title highlights the subjective, ill-defined nature of the concept of sustainability as it currently stands [36]. ...
... The second is a niche of business-and-society concern denominated "corporate environmentalism" [58]. The latter concern arose in the 1970 s to address a range of environmental disasters that captured public attention [36]. As Hoffman explains it, corporate environmentalism has experienced an "evolution in what environmentalism "means" to the corporation-how it is conceptualized and what is seen as the proper role and response of the corporation in responding to it" [58]. ...
Article
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The terms “corporate social responsibility” (CSR), “sustainability”, “sustainable development” and “corporate sustainability” (CS) are critical terms for developing, analysing and evaluating public and private policy goals. These terms are used to make decisions about investment, policy development, and strategy creation. The terms emerged in different fields of endeavour at different points in time. Accordingly, they have different meanings; however, over time they have come to be used interchangeably mixing up policy agendas, confusing managers, regulators, activists and the public at large. We demonstrate that CSR is the best term for focusing on individual business organisations, “corporate sustainability” is an organisation level environmental policy, “sustainable development” is a public policy, and “sustainability” is the broadest term encompassing global local and organisational levels.
... Begrepets vandring og utvanning er knyttet til dets manglende mulighet til å relatere det til målbare størrelser. Dette er imidlertid også med på å gjøre begrepet populaert og anvendelig (White 2013). Sosialantropologen Melissa Leach (et al. 2010) påpeker at det er viktig å forske på hvordan sentrale samfunnsaktører tolker baerekraftig utvikling, nettopp fordi «sustainability refers to explicit qualities of human well-being, social equity and environmental integrity» (s. ...
Chapter
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Sammendrag Dette kapitlet handler om hvordan baerekraftig utvikling som mål og virkemiddel fortolkes og anvendes i gruveutvikling og gruvedrift. Gjennom å anvende det generelle begrepet og belyse miljøhensyn, økonomiske hensyn og sosiale hensyn ser vi på samfunnsdebatter og konflikter knyttet til utvinning av mineraler i nordområdene. I kapitlet presenteres tre caser i Nord-Norge hvor utvikling av gruvedrift har vaert aktuelt, og vi ser på argumentene som er blitt brukt for og imot dette i lys av baerekraft. Forfatterne poengterer at begrepets åpne og vide kjennetegn gjør at det brukes både strategisk og prag-matisk. Samtidig bør det sees i lys av kulturelle og historiske føringer. Vi konkluderer med at fortolkningen av baerekraft har få eller ingen objektive måleparametere, men er sosialt konstruert og kan tolkes på ulike måter. Noe som fører til at man både kan knytte baerekraft til satsing på gruvedrift og motstand mot dette.
... SD is a difficult concept to describe since it has diverse meanings in different fields (White, 2013). However, most academics define it as a balance of three factors: environmental, economic, and social. ...
Article
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Nowadays, utility of the multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) technique in tackling real-world complex problems has risen tremendously. Even the United Nations is focusing on decision-making in order to accomplish Agenda 2030, as stated in its paragraph 48. The desire to promote sustainable development (SD) necessitates complex decision models, which could be achieved through the use of an efficient MCDM approach. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is one of the most efficient MCDM techniques that is incorporated in this study. The purpose of this work is to provide a contrasting of AHP's application that emerged between 2011 and 2022, rather than to reflect on its methodological improvements. Its application encompasses a wide range of disciplines including Renewable Energy, Sustainable manufacturing, Natural Hazards, Environmental Pollution, Landfill waste management and many others which lies explicitly or implicitly under the theme of SD. Previously, many reviews have been conducted that concentrated on a single decision topic; moreover, this review explore the comprehensive viewpoint of decision problems. As per statistical results, Middle Eastern countries such as Iran placed top in terms of applying AHP application in different sectors. GIS and fuzzy logic are the most often used approaches to incorporate AHP across all disciplines. Notably, findings indicate that the most decision problem have selection and assessment as a major concern whereas, environmental, economical, LULC & DFR are more frequently used criteria.
... Research shows that ESG criteria are harder to be implemented in vertical and dispersed corporate structures compared to the matrix structures due to ineffective communication and sharing of resources (Tufinio et al., 2013). However, even with the matrix organizational structures there are problems of taking over or assigning responsibility for the sustainability objectives and the project manager must negotiate with the operational managers for the release of resources (White, 2013). ...
... Sustainability is not necessarily a fixed destination, but rather a set of characteristics intended to describe the functioning of some future system [18]. This perspective frames the concept in a more realistic and actionable fashion, in that it allows for a view of sustainability as a "prediction" of what will endure in a manner sensitive to both time and spatial variability [19]. ...
Article
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In the context of the Sustainable Development Goals interest and concerns about the environmental impact of major sporting events have become increasingly widespread, voiced not only by organizers, but also spectators and residents of affected areas, as well politicians and institutional representatives of the host territories. There are multiple studies of the economic, social, and legal impacts of major sport events. Although several studies have pointed to a range of environmental impacts, there is no clear consensus on the effects that a major event can have on the natural environment. Thus, the aim of this article is to carry out a systematic review of the state of the art. Following the steps proposed by the PRISMA protocol, a selection of scientific articles from between 2000 and 2021 was made. The overall analysis shows that the negatives outweigh the positives, as only 32.91% of the effects described in the articles are deemed to be positive, with 62.03% deemed to be negative, and finally, 5.06% found to be inconclusive. With varying degrees of success, organizers and promoters of major events are already attempting measures to reduce negative impacts and enhance positive ones.
... Although sustainability is now a familiar and widely used concept in contemporary society, different stakeholders continue to present different understandings, leading to a high degree of ambiguity and fuzziness of the term (Aleixo, Ulisses, & Azeiteirod, 2018). The concept is characterized by various definitions and applications (White, 2013), since multiple perspectives, beliefs and values have an influence on its meaning. Brinkman (2014) argues that sustainability is the first true postmodern discipline of our time: 'Because of the variety of approaches, practices, and viewpoints, we do not have clear-cut definitions of the field that fall nicely within modernist disciplinary structures.' (Brinkman, 2014:13). ...
Article
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Present and future business leaders might be amongst the most important actors in initiating and managing a transition towards a sustainable economy and society in general. Preparing them for such a role has to be a central task of higher education institutions, especially business schools. Our paper maps how business schools frame sustainability in relation to probable and possible futures by examining the external online communication of the TOP100 business schools. Close to half of these institutions do not address sustainability in their education-related online communication, while the other half emphasize its economic dimension almost exclusively. We found little proof in their education-related communication that business schools attempt to stray from the path of the status quo, accordingly they continue to strengthen a neo-liberal worldview, only incorporating those aspects of sustainability which are compatible with this perspective. We also have to acknowledge, however, that business schools are ‘open institutions’ attempting to meet the expectations of their stakeholders. This may result in numerous and even conflicting goals. Choosing only a few of them as a communicative focus, (e.g., promoting individual strategies for career enhancement), wrings out the larger organisational and social issues like sustainability in its holistic sense.
... Therefore, it cannot be assumed that if a building is considered sustainable, its users will be satisfied. Owens and Legere [68] and White [69] have concluded that the understanding of what is a sustainable building is still unclear and has to be investigated from different perspectives. Evidence for this is that there is a wide range of definitions of sustainability [70][71][72][73] which has made many researchers face a lot of confusion and uncertainty with the term sustainability [74,75]. ...
Article
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Decreasing the impact of educational buildings on the environment is a primary concern of the sustainable building movement. However, limited research has centered on improving educational building sustainability from users’ perspectives. This study aims to determine an overall user perspective satisfaction scale (OUPS) for post-secondary educational buildings, determine the factors and sub-factors that affect users’ perspectives, and create a building sustainability platform for evaluating user satisfaction. The main goal of the developed model is to offer facility managers the current users’ perspectives on post-secondary educational buildings to improve sustainability from users’ perspectives. The results revealed a significant influence of thermal comfort (40%) and aesthetics (22%) on users’ perspectives. The developed model was validated by experts working in the facility management field and they acknowledged it as having good potential. This work first utilized the Fuzzy Analytic Network Process (FANP) modelling technique to determine weights for each factor and sub-factor and then employed the fuzzy expert system to develop an OUPS. Questionnaire responses and interviews with facility managers and users were used to develop these models for a case study of the M.B. building at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec.
... However, it is difficult to define sustainability (White, 2013). Within research, sustainability has been explained as social equity, environmental stewardship, and equilibrium among financial growth. ...
Article
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The unprecedented economic growth in recent decades has cultivated the exploitation of natural resources and over-consumption, leading to ecological deterioration and sustainability. The ever-increasing consumption in developing countries is creating a significant environmental strain. Thus, the industry and consumers’ environmental issues and their harmful effects on human health have led to concerns among researchers, scientists, academic communities, and policymakers. The present work examines the impact of different consumption value factors on sustainable consumption behavior concerning consumer choice in Pakistan and China. A cross-sectional study is conducted, and data are collected through a primary source questionnaire. A sample of 431 respondents is chosen from different cities in Pakistan, and a sample of 342 respondents is selected from China. Estimation techniques like descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, multicollinearity, R square, independent sample t-test, the coefficient of correlation, and regression analysis are used for the data analysis. The comparative results show that knowledge values (KVs) and emotional values (EMVs) significantly influence the choice behavior of respondents toward environmentally friendly products both in Pakistan and China. In contrast, social values (SVs) and conditional values (CVs) show insignificant influence. Furthermore, functional values (FVs) are significant in Pakistan while insignificant in the context of China, and environmental values (EVs) are significant in China although insignificant in Pakistan with regard to sustainable consumption behavior.
... To systematically investigate the "wicked problems [1]" related to sustainability, many suggest that the environmental, economic, and social aspects should be balanced and taken into consideration [2]. Furthermore, Hopwood et al. [3] claim that the research separation between the environment and human behavior is incompetent to investigate the highly uncertain and complex sustainability challenges. ...
Article
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Co-design approach is increasingly popular in many organizations that address global change and social sustainability challenges, thanks to its unique and diverse methods of engaging relevant people in design processes and decision-making. However, the social distancing led by the COVID-19 pandemic seriously problematized the traditional in-person co-design activities. A sustainable online transition is unprecedentedly pressing. By acknowledging the limitations of online co-design, i.e., lack of means for participant engagement, we argue that gamification holds great promise for online co-design. This paper presents an empirical study to investigate this potential qualitatively. Based on the data collected from three gamified online co-design implementations, we examine the benefits of gamification and how future activities should be designed and implemented from the participants’ perspectives. Based on the participants’ perceptions, we propose several recommendations for designing impactful gamification. The finding suggests that gamification can facilitate online co-design activities in an enjoyable, relaxing, structuring, and creative manner, since they are perceived and recognized by the participants. Moreover, the successful implementation of online co-design implies that great sustainability benefits can be achieved through online transition, i.e., reducing paper consumption and time spent on meetings and unproductive discussions, supporting extensive diversity and density in representation. Online can enable this by overcoming not only the geographic and time limitations but also relevant social issues.
... Therefore, it was necessary to link educational design and organizational culture in the evaluation of a sustainable building from the user's perspective (Alfalah and Zayed, 2020). For this reason, Owens and Legere (2015) and White (2013) concluded that the understanding of sustainable building is still unclear and has to investigate in different perspective. Because of that, most recent sustainable facility management (SFM) research studies that cover the social aspect (Che-Ani et al., 2010; Waly and Helal, 2010), have limitations that hinder its effectiveness and usefulness. ...
Conference Paper
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Over the past few years, practitioners and researchers have worked together to establish frameworks that look into and evaluate the sustainability aspects of buildings using different measures and practices. Hence, this research paper introduces a three-tier framework for user perspective assessment in educational buildings. The first tier involves identification of the users’ perspective attributes that have a direct influence on the users’ perspective in existing buildings. These assessment attributes cover most of the users’ perspective areas in existing buildings. In addition, they are shown to be more comprehensive and to cover more areas compared against sustainability rating systems. The second tier is the weighting process of main factors stepping on the implementation of fuzzy analytical network process technique. The third tier is a fuzzy expert system that to determine the overall user perspective index based on merging the weights of factors alongside their scores. The E.V building in Concordia University was assessed to determine the impact of weighting and local context on the user perspective assessment.
... It is argued that considering minority perspectives may instead lead not only to a major integration, but also to new conceptions of the socio-technical change, characterized by a fairer and more natural understanding of sustainability (Pyhälä, 2020;Velasco-Herrejón et al., 2022). Still, the existence of different stakeholders' perspectives is one of the major gaps in the implementation of sustainability (Souza et al, 2015) and any attempt to further develop a universal concept may prolong the controversial debate (Del Río Castro et al., 2021;White, 2013). ...
Article
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Motivated by the rising attention of businesses and regulators towards how digital transformation can assist sustainability improvement, this paper sheds light on the relationships between these two phenomena. Specifically, this research pioneers the study of ‘digital sustainability’ through a systematic review of 153 academic articles aimed to 1) consolidate the existing research, 2) understand the thematic connections amongst the different studies, and 3) identify research gaps to move forward in the development of the topic. The suggested research agenda has important theoretical and practical implications. Through the identified gaps, this study acknowledges the management scholarship of pitfalls and delays on the research topic, providing detailed guidance to develop this new stream of subject area. The opportunistic approach of this paper responds to the practical call for support in understanding the use of digitalization for sustainability-related goals. This research directly impacts a wide range of practitioners, including managers, consultants, and policymakers.
... In recent years, sustainability has aroused the interest of numerous researchers, with numerous conceptual and empirical studies emerging. The scope of this discipline can be observed through the studies of (Kajikawa et al., 2008;Castrillón & Mares, 2014;Bettencourt & Kaur, 2011;Schoolman et al., 2012;Buter & Van Raan, 2013;White, 2013), among others. In these investigations, bibliometric, bibliographic and citation analysis techniques on the field of sustainability knowledge are combined, enabling to see a complete in-depth analysis of the area of study. ...
Thesis
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In the last decade, entrepreneurship has been seen as a solution to social inequality and environmental degradation rather than a possible cause. This fact called academics' attention to develop a connection between traditional entrepreneurship, society, and the environment. They established a new type of entrepreneurial activity called sustainable entrepreneurship (SE). The (SE) basis is to preserve nature, sustain life, and the community is searching for perceived opportunities to create future products, processes, and services. According to the literature, SE is an emerging research trend that can be defined as the realisation of sustainable innovations aimed at the mass market and benefit most society. Therefore, (SE) makes a significant contribution to the transition to a sustainable economy. There are indications that a shift towards sustainable business strategies in which economic profit is essentially linked to social and ecological value is essential. For these reasons, the (SE) has received increasing importance from different actors, such as international institutions, companies and universities. A clear example was the development of the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, approved in 2015 by the United Nations (UN), which provides a framework for collaboration at a global level to implement (SE) initiatives. This type of entrepreneur starts a business to serve both their interests and those of the community, addressing unmet social and environmental needs. Therefore, this phenomenon can be seen as a unique perspective that combines economic, social and environmental value with a general concern for the well-being of future generations. In this way, (SE) differs from conventional entrepreneurship in aspects related to the creation of value, highlighting among them the search for the following three aspects (1) economic value, (2) social value and (3) environmental value. Three academic contributions have been proposed to achieve the established aims, which constitute the relevant chapters of this doctoral thesis. This research is presented as a compendium of three contributions, each focused on achieving specific proposed aims under different methodological strategies. In the first contribution, an in-depth analysis was carried out using bibliometric techniques and instruments that made it possible to map the central (SE) academic literature and analyse the most substantial contributions to research in this field. The chronological analysis of the literature in the Web of Science-Social Sciences Citation Index (WoS-SSCI) database-up to January 2018- provides new knowledge, such as the most influential journals, authors and articles so far. This research reviews one of the most recognised databases, the Web of Science-Social Sciences Citation Index, having a chronological distribution of the publications that allows a systematic review of the scientific literature in the timeline. The study also shows the most outstanding journals and papers in the field. The largest number of articles published in (SE) are published in top journals such as the Journal of Cleaner Production, Sustainability, Business Strategy and the Environment Journal of Business Venturing. The second contribution is to analyse the influence that SMEs' sustainability competencies have on their social entrepreneurial orientation and the influence of this strategy on the company's performance (social and economic). This research focuses on measuring how the leader's sustainable competencies influence the social entrepreneurial orientation of SMEs and their outcomes. It is observed that the key competencies that leaders must form or develop in order for SMEs to have a social entrepreneurial orientation are focused on environmental and social practices based on four dimensions: System and thinking competence, normative competence, interpersonal competence and action competence. The third contribution is to find out whether small and medium enterprises in this country are involved in the adoption of sustainable practices and see whether there are significant differences in adoption according to size, sector, and age. Through an exploratory-descriptive study, the research made it possible to analyse the sustainability practices that SMEs in Ecuador include in their business management. Among the most important findings is that managers have an extremely positive and favourable attitude towards sustainability. Practices in economic sustainability have a medium-high implementation level. The main strengths are related to SMEs' social image and human rights; SMEs analysed show concern that their supplier enterprises should also act responsibly to convey the image of a responsible and reliable company. Finally, Ecuador's sustainability is quite relevant at the Government, the University and the Enterprises, which seek to involve, raise awareness. Support enterprises to manage their SMEs in a socially responsible way and become mobilisers of a more just and equitable society. For this reason, this research focuses on small and medium-sized enterprises in Ecuador which face immense sustainability problems and challenges. There is a clear need to build and monitor public policies that are based on evidence, such as indicators designed to monitor environmental dynamics and their interrelationships with social and productive dynamics.
... Bunun yanı sıra, terim, sürdürülebilir kalkınma, toplumsal sürdürülebilirlik gibi eşdeğer anlamda kullanımlara da sahiptir (Shkliarevsky, 2015). White (2013) Sürdürülebilirlik söylemi, neredeyse Aydınlanma Çağı kadar eskiye gider ancak günümüzde kullanılan hali, 1970'lerin başında ortaya çıkmıştır (Chasin, 2014;Kuhlman & Farrington, 2010). O zamandan beri, sürdürülebilirlik tartışmaları yeni bir düzleme taşınmış ve dünya gündeminin önde gelen meselelerinden biri halini almıştır (WCED, 1987). ...
Chapter
Sürdürülebilirlik kavramına ve hedeflerine her ne kadar dünya genelinde oldukça rağbet edilse de belirlenen hedeflere ulaşma konusunda ne yazık ki benzer bir ilgi söz konusu değildir. Uluslararası finans ve yardım kuruluşları, gelişmiş ülkeler kadar diğer ülkelerin de bu hedefleri gerçekleştirmede payı olduğunu hesaba katarak yeşil iktisat fonlarını artırmış, hatta çoğu zaman fon ve destek verme koşulunu bu tip projelere bağlamıştır. Haliyle, bu durum, gelişmekte olan ve iktisadi geçiş aşamasındaki ülkelerdeki yatırımcılar, politika yapıcılar ve bürokratlar için teşvik edici olmuştur. Ancak, yine bahse konu ülkelerde, alınan destek, yardım ve fonların miktarına kıyasla sürdürülebilir kalkınma hedeflerine ulaşma oranı arasında dengesizlikler mevcuttur. Bunun sebebi ise, bu ülkelerin birçoğunun mustarip olduğu yaygın ve gündelik yolsuzluk sorunudur. Yolsuzluğun yaygın olduğu bu ülkelere aktarılan bütçelerin önemli bir kısmının kişisel çıkarlar için kullandığını çıkarımı, yine aynı bütçelerin nasıl kullanıldığıyla ilgili resmi kayıtların bulunmaması sebebiyle yapılmaktadır. Bu çalışmada Bosna-Hersek örneği üzerinden sürdürülebilir kalkınma söyleminin, yolsuzluğun yaygın olduğu ülkelerde kalkınma hedeflerini gerçekleştirmek için değil de, nasıl yolsuzluğu beslemek için kullanıldığı hususu tartışılmıştır.
... The Brundtland Commission in 1987 defined sustainable development as "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987, p. 41). The term sustainability, however, is used with various perspectives (White, 2013). For some, most important is an economic perspective focused on intergenerational tradeoffs, and a comparison of value and costs to the society (Solow, 1993;Stavins et al., 2003). ...
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This chapter examines the extent to which completed GEF projects are sustainable and the factors affecting sustainability. We considered only those projects that were covered through postcompletion evaluation at least 2 years after implementation completion, and where the evaluation reports provided adequate information related to observed sustainability during the postcompletion period. We assessed 62 projects to meet the selection criteria, then completed a desk review of the postcompletion evaluation reports and other relevant documents for these projects to assess the extent to which the project outcome was sustainable. We found that the projects covered through postcompletion evaluations were generally sustainable, with the sustainability outlook deteriorating for some projects while improving for others. The incidence of the catalytic processes that enhance sustainability—sustaining, mainstreaming, replication, scaling-up, and market change—was higher at postcompletion evaluation, as the passage of time allows long-term project outcomes to manifest. At the project level, we observed these catalytic processes in a wider set of activities at postcompletion evaluation than at implementation completion. Factors such as financial support for follow-up, political support, follow-up by and capacities of the executing agency, stakeholder buy-in, and project design seem to play a crucial role in determining project sustainability.
... The variety of sustainability definitions indicates the complexity of the concept, the wide range of its elements, and the broad application of its principles [32]. The concept of sustainable development receives a constant critique from academia and businesses. ...
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Youth attitudes and behavior in tourism activities are crucial for sustainable tourism development. This study aims to identify the statistical types of youth according to their expressed behavior in sustainability and attitudes toward sustainable tourism development. Survey data were collected from 1085 respondents representing different Baltic Sea countries—Latvia, Lithuania, and Russia. A unique research instrument, constructed by the authors, was developed for the empirical research, responding to the latest theoretical insights and models and was empirically validated by statistical methods (the factor validity of the scales was tested with Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, etc.). Attitudes towards sustainable tourism development were measured with the SUS-TAS scale. The factor clustering method used in the study identified the statistical types of the youth included, according to the expression of sustainable behavior and the attitudes toward sustainable tourism development. The results indicated that the majority of youth belong to the “oriented toward sustainable behavior” type (50.6%), while the analysis of youth attitudes showed that 71.5% belong to the socioeconomic type, indicating that young people prioritize the long-term socioeconomic wellbeing of the region, which can be achieved through efficient management, tourism planning, and active public participation in the implementation of tourism policies.
... Etiket bulutları belirli metinlere veya kavramlara görsel olarak derinlemesine bir bakış açısı sunmak için kullanılır. Bununla birlikte, etiket bulutları belirlenen bir konu ile ilgili farklı görüşleri görsel olarak bir araya getirmekle kalmaz aynı zamanda yazı tipi boyutlarını değiştirerek frekansları saptamak amacıyla da kullanılır (White, 2013). ...
... In recent years, many interpretations of the concept of sustainable development have emerged, so scientists are identifying the components of sustainable development. M. White [1] conducted a study of the sustainable development policy of leading international companies working in the field of construction. His research has shown that sustainable development policies vary depending on the size and goals of the company. ...
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The article is devoted to the issue of sustainable development and practical aspects of its implementation in the field of construction. Priority directions in formation of strategy of sustainable development of construction companies are established. The success of the implementation of the established areas of activity depends on the indicators of effectiveness and efficiency in the field of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility and their monitoring systems. The analysis was performed on 100 construction companies in Ukraine. The construction industry illustrated by concentration calculation indexes which allow to quantify the degree of concentration and intensity of competition in construction. Recommendations for the identification of sustainable development criteria for construction companies as for the development of sustainable development programs and further confirmation of sustainable development reports by auditors were identified.
... This paper understands sustainability as the process which allows humans to satisfy the basic needs of present and future generations, while reducing poverty and safeguarding the ecological support systems [4,5]. In an urban setting, this entitles the recognition of the interlinked effects of economic and socio-cultural considerations while striving for enhancing environmental quality, economic efficiency and human well-being, all embedded within an Institutional component [6,7]. ...
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Steering towards a path of sustainability and resilience in urban environments depends greatly on effective institutions, governance and strategic planning. National governments are increasingly expanding municipal institutions’ mandates by delegating decision making on land-use planning and urban development to local and regional levels. This trend poses municipalities with a complex challenge of setting clear sustainability targets and lifting the institutional barriers inside and outside of their organisation. Based on the business motivation model (BMM), this study presents the results of a thematic analysis identifying barriers and enablers characterizing the institutional capacity base of a municipal organisation in the context of sustainability at an urban level. The results show that the most relevant barrier is the lack of standardisation in sustainability-related working practices, whereas the main institutional enablers relate to flexible working directives that promote the development of innovative projects. This points towards a strong need for a more integrated, dynamic and powerful development approach for sustainable urban areas on a local level.
... This effect was expected to some extent as, even in the academic literature, there is a lack of consensus on the meaning of sustainability and related concepts. For example, White [43] found over 100 definitions of sustainability in the literature. A lesson learned is that professors should engage in promoting a shared vision on the meaning of sustainable competencies. ...
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While learning competencies in education for sustainable development are increasingly recognized as important, few empirical studies consider competencies delivered at a program level. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a program evaluation can be approached through a participatory approach, and what this means for learning competencies for sustainability. The innovative method chosen was to implement a student-led evaluation of the program or a form of practice-based learning whereby students engaged in a participatory evaluation of their own program. This evaluation involved a mixed-methods research design and engaging with different actors—from other students and teachers in the program to alumni, administrators and employers. Students agreed on what competencies to evaluate against, then designed their assessment to gauge how and in what way five key competencies were being delivered. The program delivers competencies for sustainable development, yet there was some discrepancy between what students experienced in the program and what teachers believed to be delivering in the classroom. The learning-by-doing approach suggests that a sixth competency—implementation skills—is relevant to teaching for sustainable development. A participatory, student-led approach to evaluating a Master program is a novel contribution to the literature, which in itself led to the development of competencies for sustainability, particularly strategic, interpersonal and implementation skills.
... There has so far been little scholarship examining the relationship between synthetic biology and sustainability [17][18][19][20]. This is complicated by the contested meaning of sustainability itself [21,22]. Multiple, competing definitions of and approaches to sustainability exist. ...
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The field of synthetic biology is increasingly being positioned as a key driver of a more sustainable, bio-based economy, and has seen rapid industry growth over the past 15 years. In this paper we undertake an exploratory investigation of the relationship between sustainability and synthetic biology, identifying and analyzing sustainability-related language on the public websites of 24, US-based synthetic biology companies. We observe that sustainability is a visible part of the self-presentation of the nascent synthetic biology industry, explicitly mentioned by 18 of the 24 companies. The dominant framing of sustainability on these company websites emphasizes environmental gains and “free-market” approaches to sustainability, with little explicit mention of social dimensions of sustainability such as access, justice or intergenerational equity. Furthermore, the model of sustainability presented focuses on incremental transition towards environmental sustainability through direct substitution of products and processes using bioengineered alternatives ( n = 16 companies), with no change in societal consumption or policy frameworks required in order to see sustainability gains. One-third of the companies analyzed ( n = 8) mention “nature” on their websites, variously framing it as a resource to be managed or as a source of inspiration; whether the latter signals a potentially more complex relationship with nature than advanced free-market models of sustainability remains to be seen. As the synthetic biology industry begins to grow in size and visibility, we suggest this is an opportune time for the community to engage in explicit deliberation about its approach to sustainability.
... Therefore, De Matos and Clegg (2013) consider change and sustainability as two sides of the same coin. For the purpose of the current study, organizational change for sustainability refers to the deliberate activities that move an organization from its present state to a desired future state (Stouten et al. 2018) in order to balance environmental, social, and economic concerns (White 2013). This definition essentially determines the scope of the current review, which includes only those studies that relate to the changes organizations undertake to achieve sustainability in terms of social, economic, and environmental aspects. ...
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Although a large number of researchers have explored the dynamics of organizational change for environmental, social, and financial sustainability, a systematic literature review highlighting the state of the knowledge so far is lacking. The current paper attempts to address this gap. A total of 62 peer-reviewed journal articles were selected by using a range of databases. The review of the available literature reveals that, overall, the field has moved toward conducting more theory-building research, given that the majority of the studies either employ a case study approach (30) or remain conceptual in nature (19). It appears that relatively more studies have examined the influence of organizational antecedents on the scale and stages of organizational change for sustainability. In this context, the impact of learning, organizational culture, and leadership on the process of change has attracted more attention. The literature also focuses on exploring the influence of scale and stages of change on sustainability outcomes. Moreover, the influence of organizational antecedents on the process of change in terms of management accounting systems has largely been ignored in the literature. Further, less is known about the impact of contextual factors on the process of organizational change for sustainability. The identified areas of future research will potentially guide in addressing the research gaps.
... (2015) [22] , HEI leaders must formalize their commitment to sustainability by signing declarations. For White (2013) [54] , the sustainability of HEI implies the adoption of measurable and manageable objectives and indicators. Sustainability assessment tools (eg AASHE -The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) can play a strategic role not only in developing a holistic and systemic approach to sustainability, but also as a vital enabler for change towards sustainability. ...
Thesis
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Many studies have explored how universities can improve their role in society by developing new approaches and educational content and providing research support for sustainability goals. However, it tends to report experiences and challenges faced by HEI in the inclusion of environmental issues in their teaching, research, extension and university management activities, considering these activities almost always as watertight. Thus, this study aimed to integrate the dimensions of sustainability with the core activity of Brazilian HEI. Using methods such as bibliographic and documentary review, the research analysis took into account scientific studies and collected data related to sustainability indicators in HEI and in society as a whole.
... In most cases of sustainable development, there is the need to reach a compromise between conflicting economic, social, and environmental aspects, as well as beneficiaries' expectations (Merad et al., 2013). With increasing production on a global scale, new and diverse approaches have been proposed to increase productivity, create competitive advantage, and develop businesses (White, 2013). Today, given the increasing growth of the world population and human activities and their social/environmental consequences, organizations must consider sustainable development, along with economic issues, as a serious concern (Maier, 2018). ...
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Sustainable development is a process through which the needs of the present generation are satisfied without damaging the benefits or resources for meeting the needs of succeeding generations. Sustainable development could help to realize a society with far better conditions than those in today’s society, especially for future generations. This study proposes a comprehensive multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method that draws on interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy (IVIF) sets to assess sustainable development at companies. The method proposed incorporates analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and weighted aggregated sum product assessment (WASPAS) under IVIF environment. An IVIF set is a powerful tool for dealing with uncertainty by taking degrees of membership and non-membership functions in an interval. The results of the IVIF-AHP showed that “ecologic impacts” had the highest weight among the main criteria. The study used IVIF-WASPAS to rank the companies in terms of organizational sustainable development. This study could provide practical guidelines for decision-makers seeking to implement sustainable development in their organizations. In order to validate robustness of the proposed method, sensitivity analyses are implemented. Also, at the end of the study, to prove the superiority of the proposed approach, a comparative analysis is employed.
... The immediate surrounding around us, such as the clogged drain and the odd grass patches, were excluded in our schemata of it. It is not surprising then that the same ambiguity seems to have found its way into the conceptualisation of sustainability-related education, a problem in which the term, though all-encompassing and is increasingly emphasised as a whole, has been manipulated by various stakeholders utilising it to represent different perspectives and epistemologies (Le Grange, 2017;White, 2013;Jickling, 1994). Likewise, developed from as malleable a concept as sustainability, Green STEM could be just as easily manipulated. ...
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This theoretical piece explores the frame of mind required for a Science, Technology, Education and Mathematics (STEM) education in an uncertain time. Predominantly argued from an epistemic standpoint, this paper analyses the relationship between environment, anthropomorphism, the essence of education, and our presumed mastery of nature. In the attempt to envision and realise a form of STEM education with sustainability as a frame of mind that would befit Malaysia, National Wildlife Foundation’s Green STEM; Bybee’s STEM Literacy; and Bonnett’s idea of sustainability were explored. Through the exploration, a possible frame of mind for Green STEM that could facilitate learning and challenge the status quo of being emerges. Ultimately a STEM education with sustainability as a frame of mind is meant to encourage discussion and exploration of issues as it arises rather than being prescriptive. It is hoped that through such an educational approach, we will eventually arrive at a more harmonious way of being.
... Figure 2 provides a word cloud using the words/terms provided by the respondents. The word cloud provides a composite picture of the essence of sustainable brewing from the perspectives of Iowa brewers in our sample (White, 2013). The most used terms were "efficiency" and "recycle," followed by "environment," "reuse," "impact," and "water use." ...
Article
The rapid expansion of the resource‐intensive brewing industry has led to U.S. and state‐level initiatives to encourage sustainable craft brewing practices. These efforts raise questions about brewers' current brewing practices and the conditions and factors that might influence a brewer's decision to adopt sustainable practices. We conducted an in‐depth survey of Iowa craft brewers in 2019 to evaluate current sustainability practices within breweries. In addition, we elicited brewer perceptions regarding consumer preferences and willingness‐to‐pay for sustainably produced beer. We analyze these factors together with data on brewery production characteristics and the brewer's personal beliefs and demographics. While most breweries in our sample track key environmental metrics to some degree, many of them lack environmental plans. Further, we find significant variation in the degree to which brewers believe there is opportunity to leverage sustainable brewing practices to charge consumers a higher price. We also provide insight on relationships between environmental practices and potential resources provided to breweries. These findings improve our understanding of craft brewers' tradeoffs regarding sustainable brewing practices that could apply more generally to other resource‐intensive sectors.
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The built environment presents particular challenges in relation to the achievement of sustainability, not least because of the number of building types and the uses to which they are put. Design issues thus include ensuring that buildings are energy efficient with effective ventilation in relation to use while enabling the maximum utilization of shared spaces and flexibility of use. In this context, many of the underlying technologies, as for instance those involved in energy management and use, are mechatronic in nature while developments such as Building Digital Twins are supporting real-time responses to changing conditions. The chapter examines the background to these issues and places them into the context of the developing approach to building construction, operation and management. In doing so, it draws on as an exemplar the award winning, including at COP26, design and development of the Antonio Brancati School in Pesaro in Italy to illustrate how innovative approaches to design and the use of technology have enabled the creation not only of a place of learning, but also a shared resource for the local community.
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This research book aims to conceptualise the scale and spectrum of Building Information Modelling (BIM) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) approaches in energy efficient building design and to develop its functional solutions with a focus on four crucial aspects of building envelop, building layout, occupant behaviour and heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Drawn from theoretical development on the sustainability, informatics and optimisation paradigms in built environment, the energy efficient building design will be marked through the power of data and BIM-intelligent agents during the design phase. It will be further developed via smart derivatives to reach a harmony in the systematic integration of energy efficient building design solutions, a gap that is missed in the extant literature and that this book aims to fill. This approach will inform a vision for future and provide a framework to shape and respond to our built environment and how it transforms the way we design and build. By considering the balance of BIM, AI and energy efficient outcomes, the future development of buildings will be regenerated in a direction that is sustainable in the long run. This book is essential reading for those in the AEC industry as well as computer scientists.
Article
Background Digital infrastructures, i.e., ICT systems, or system-of-systems, providing digital capabilities, such as storage and computational services, are experiencing an ever-growing demand for data consumption, which is only expected to increase in the future. This trend leads to a question we need to answer: How can we evolve digital infrastructures to keep up with the increasing data demand in a sustainable way? Objective The goal of this study is to understand what is the future of sustainable digital infrastructures, in terms of: which solutions are, or will be, available to sustainably evolve digital infrastructures, and which are the related adoption factors, impediments, and open problems. Methods We carried out a 3-phase mixed-method qualitative empirical study, comprising semi-structured interviews, followed by focus groups, and a plenary session with parallel working groups. In total, we conducted 13 sessions involving 48 digital infrastructure practitioners and researchers. Results From our investigation emerges a landscape for sustainable digital infrastructures, composed of 30 solutions, 5 adoption factors, 4 impediments, and 13 open problems. We further synthesized our results in 4 incremental scenarios, which outline the future evolution of sustainable digital infrastructures. Conclusion From an initial shift from on-premise to the cloud, as time progresses, digital infrastructures are expected to become increasingly distributed, till it will be possible to dynamically allocate resources by following time, space, and energy. Numerous solutions will support this change, but digital infrastructures are envisaged to be able to evolve sustainably only by (i) gaining a wider awareness of digital sustainability, (ii) holding every party accountable for their sustainability throughout value chains, and (iii) establishing cross-domain collaborations.
Article
Purpose Identifying and analyzing aspects related to sustainable human resources (HRs) in an emerging, Iberoamerican location (Monterrey, Mexico). Documenting employee experiences regarding sustainable practices of HR in their companies to understand the enacted meaning of sustainable HR management (HRM). This study aims to seek answers to understand the ways environmental sustainability is present in HR subprocesses and the ways companies regard HRs from a sustainability perspective. Design/methodology/approach This exploratory research has a qualitative approach. The authors collected and summarized semi-structured interviews with 31 key informants that work fully or partially in HRs in a large, industrialized city in an Iberoamerican, emerging economy (Monterrey, Mexico). Findings The main findings based on responses from HR professionals are as follows: HR activities may contribute to the sustainability of the business and its physical environment; HR can create a culture of care for the resources, but training and development activities are not currently used optimally; and in addition to the economic sustainability of the employers, social and environmental sustainability are also within HR’s influence sphere. Originality/value This study contributes to the emerging literature on sustainability in HRM, due the dearth of information related to “green” or environmental practices in HRM. This study reports specifically on the ways this perspective adds value within Mexican enterprises, but the authors are confident that these findings also generalize across industries, enterprises and regions.
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Supply chain transparency and its connection to sustainability is a current topic in supply chain management research. The term supply chain transparency is used very loosely in this discourse. Therefore, this article aims to clarify the understanding of supply chain transparency in the context of sustainability to enable future research. In a content analysis-based literature review, 92 peer-reviewed articles were identified in the intersection of sustainability, supply chains, and transparency. Only 30 articles contained a definition of transparency. Supply chain transparency was used and defined very differently among the researchers. By providing a general definition and framework of sustainable supply chain transparency, the term “supply chain transparency” gains more clarity. Three dimensions of transparency were identified: sustainable supply chain information, involved stakeholders, and perspective. The supply chain transparency research was conducted primarily in the context of the food and apparel industry. Transparency was characterized differently among the industries and was studied with different foci. Furthermore, the review revealed a focus of supply chain transparency research on the social dimension of sustainability. Additionally, a wide range of topics on supply chain transparency has been covered in the existing literature, and opportunities for future research are outlined. Future researchers are also encouraged to define transparency more clearly.
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The topic of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained considerable popularity among researchers in recent decades in the Czech Republic. However, given this, no detailed study has been demonstrated on whether Czech insurance firms benefit from this. The paper uses an extensive content analysis method to investigate the impact of CSR on financial performance in 23 Czech insurance companies. These companies are included in the Czech Association of Insurance Companies, over the past years 2019 and 2020. Further, the GRI CSR Disclosure Index and correlation analysis are used. The results indicate a significant relationship between CSR disclosure and financial results. There is a linear positive relationship between CSR and ROE, and between CSR and ROA, even a significant one between CSR and ROE. The study suggests that insurance companies in the Czech Republic ought to make continuous efforts so that their CSR activities have a positive effect on their future development.
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Muitos estudos exploraram como as universidades podem aprimorar seu papel na sociedade, desenvolvendo novas abordagens e conteúdos educacionais e fornecendo apoio à pesquisa para objetivos de sustentabilidade. Porém, consideram a atividade-fim das IES quase sempre como estanque. Deste modo, o presente estudo visou integrar as dimensões da sustentabilidade com atividade-fim das IES brasileiras. Utilizou-se de métodos como revisão bibliográfica e documental para a análise de estudos científicos relacionados à indicadores de sustentabilidade em IES. Os resultados mostraram que embora existam constantes esforços tantos das IES públicas como privadas, a sustentabilidade ainda atinge baixos níveis de integração à atividade-fim.
Article
The purpose of this research is to identify, analyze, explain the essence and orientation of regional-based tourism development as a leading sustainable sector. The approach used is qualitative and quantitative techniques. The results showed that as one of the leading sectors in the Sinjai area is tourism, considering that the tourism potential in Sinjai is quite potential seen from three aspects, namely: 1) natural tourism potential consisting of 35 natural attractions scattered from each district, 2) historical potential and regional culture consisting of 71 tourist destinations, 3) man-made tourism potential and special interest. Tourism in Sinjai has taken a toll on the Co-19 pandemic so that the impact is quite concerning for the local government and local communities. Is there still the government's support and interest in developing the tourism sector, which is a challenge in its sustainability. It takes creativity, innovation and breakthroughs by the government in absorbing various changes and technological advances for future life.
Article
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The purpose of this research is to identify, analyze, and explain the essence and orientation of regional-based tourism development as a leading sustainable sector. The approach used is qualitative and quantitative techniques. The results showed that as one of the leading sectors in the Sinjai area is tourism, considering that the tourism potential in Sinjai is quite potential seen from three aspects, namely: 1) natural tourism potential consisting of 35 natural attractions scattered from each district, 2) historical potential and regional culture consisting of 71 tourist destinations, 3) man-made tourism potential and special interest. Tourism in Sinjai has taken a toll on the Co-19 pandemic so that the impact is quite concerning for the local government and local communities. Is there still the government's support and interest in developing the tourism sector, which is a challenge in its sustainability. It takes creativity, innovation and breakthroughs by the government in absorbing various changes and technological advances for future life. Keywords---breakthroughs, development, local competence, regional leading, sustainability.
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present an exploratory analysis of campus community member (i.e. students, faculty, staff) definitions of sustainability, their perceptions of select elements of sustainability culture and the relationship between the two. Design/methodology/approach Researchers implemented a cross-sectional design where participants from two higher education institutions in the USA completed an online survey. The 352 respondents from James Madison University and 349 respondents from Wofford College included students, faculty and staff members. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patterns in the quantitative data, and an inductive theme approach was used to analyze the qualitative data. Findings This study provides evidence that sustainability is often viewed from an environmental lens, and personal definitions of sustainability may impact perceptions of campus sustainability culture elements. Generally, the highest rated elements of culture examined (i.e. university actions, signs and symbols and institutional commitments) were all aligned with the environment dimension of sustainability and consistent across sustainability definitions. However, respondents with a more integrative definition of sustainability expected to see elements of culture that aligned with the social dimension of sustainability at a considerably higher rate than the respondents who reported more narrow definitions of sustainability. Research limitations/implications Lack of generalizability, low response rates and self-selection bias are some of the limitations of the study. Practical implications Personal definitions of sustainability may impact campus community member perceptions of sustainability culture and progress on their campuses. Practitioners may use this study to inform development of more effective strategies for creating and assessing the culture of sustainability that colleges and universities are pursuing. Originality/value The empirical analysis of campus community members on two very different campus communities responds to Owens and Legere (2015) who argue for further studies to understand the concept of sustainability at other higher education institutions that are at different stages of pursuing sustainability. This paper links research about sustainability definitions to the emergent research on campus sustainability culture, filling a gap between these two areas.
Thesis
In Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC), the management of project sustainability impacts is driven by both mandatory regulations, and by individual commitments which imply acceptance by choice through conscious decision. Despite initial willingness, project sustainability outcomes can betray expectations and potential, with opportunities missed for improvements on baseline regulations. Where regulations leave room for more personally-meaningful decision-making opportunities towards sustainability, previous studies showed that cognitive limitations and non-technical barriers contribute to achieving lower sustainability standards than intended, or possible. However, empirical research is scarce on the role of linking underpinning human influences with decisions—potentially protecting decision-making opportunities which support more individually-meaningful, contextualised choices towards longer-term goals. Importantly, these types of discussions dominate final outcomes of (un-)sustainability in AEC projects, and more sustainability-biased solutions may require better decision-options linked to stakeholders’ values. Adopting a case-based grounded approach, a theoretical framework and analytical lens used human values—as conceptions of most worthwhile, meaningful, and significant ideals or goals—overlaid on communication frames—as both representations and sources of meaning. The overall aim was to first identify and map their influences in typical decision-making discussions impacting sustainability, then find where any opportunities for meaningful choice survives or can thrive. Through interviews, focus groups, and questionnaires, architect-client discussions were explored from architect’s perspectives. To track how values and frames influenced decision-making, values-influence pathways were mapped via frames to decisions in client-project cases. The main findings showed how spaces for meaningful choices were made and opportunities spent when frames met values with varying compatibility based on the individual, values-based meaningfulness of framed sustainability decision-problems and associated choice-options. Numerous architects were tacitly identifying client values then ‘framing to values’ for decisions favouring sustainability during early, more aspirational briefing and design stages. Problematically, it unexpectedly emerged that later frames of critical challenges found in all cases typically activated less-supportive and higher-priority values associated with cost/profit, benefit, risk, loss, conflict or complexity to elicit unfavourable decisions, where sustainability measures normally reduced from initial agreements. This means that together ‘values-and-frames’ play significant but typically unacknowledged roles in sustainability decision-making. When heeded, values-and-frames can be harnessed for improvements to the interpersonal spaces for stakeholders to make more individually-meaningful, values-based sustainability choices. Such decisions are more likely to endure by coordinating decision-problem and choice-option frames with decision-makers’ values. The findings contribute new insights toward knowledge of how values-and-frames interactions both constrain and can improve deciding about architectural sustainability.
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Free full manuscript accessible under: https://doi.org/10.17875/gup2021-1602 Knowing the history and context of landscapes is an unfortunately often neglected necessity for planning disciplines (including conservation and forestry). Just as a doctor can only suggest an appropriate therapy if he knows the antecedents of the disease, the possible or appropriate changes to, for example, a forest can only be seriously considered if the historical, economic and social causes for its creation and current state are described and understood. The present work undertakes this comprehensive description for the remaining oak-hornbeam forest relicts, and widespread beech forests near Göttingen. Since vegetation science is understood here as an art of telling the story(s) and current background of an object, the vegetation study of these forests, however, only forms the basis for telling a multifaceted story. This story focuses on the historical coppice with standards forests, the struggle for their conversion into beech high forests, and the underlying sustainability views of various actors. Methodically, the author draws on current, archival and historical-contemporary literature from over 400 years. The result is a closely interwoven web consisting of: the perfect integration of coppice with standards into the historical economy, numerous competing notions of sustainability and their implementation in the context of sovereign power claims, as well as the resulting silvicultural change and the defamation of the coppice with standards forest. In the process, the creation and aftermath of myths that have never been questioned internally in forestry to this day, and the short-sightedness of current nature conservation are also uncovered. The overall result is not only the "disenchantment" of the "beautiful oak-hornbeam forest", but also that of the currently predominant beech forest on limestone - a forest type that, thanks to its abundance of colourful spring geophytes, has been called not only pretty, but also "natural". However, interdisciplinary observation suggests that the species richness of these forests is in part the consequence of the historical, formerly widespread coppice with standards forestry, which "persists" in the herb layer for a long time, but will also disappear in the future.
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Sustainability science, as described by the PNAS website, is “…an emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems.” Over the past 7 y, PNAS has published over 300 papers in its unique section on sustainability science and has received and reviewed submissions for many hundreds more. What kind of a science is sustainability science?
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Attaining sustainability will require concerted interactive efforts among disciplines, many of which have not yet recognized, and internalized, the relevance of environmental issues to their main intellectual discourse. The inability of key scientific disciplines to engage interactively is an obstacle to the actual attainment of sustainability. For example, in the list of Millennium Development Goals from the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development, Johannesburg, 2002, the seventh of the eight goals, to “ensure environmental sustainability,” is presented separately from the parallel goals of reducing fertility and poverty, improving gains in equity, improving material conditions, and enhancing population health. A more integrated and consilient approach to sustainability is urgently needed.
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The axiom translation invariance consists in asserting the invariance of the ranking of two utility streams if one applies the same translation to both. This axiom is significant in the characterization of utilitarian criteria in finite dimension. This characterization is achieved thanks to the "weak weighted utilitarianism theorem".The objective here is to propose a generalization of this theorem in a space of infinite and unbounded utility streams. A consequence of the suggested generalization is that, in the context of intergenerational choice, every maximal point with respect to a paretian utilitarian order granting comparable considerations to the present and the future, is also a maximal point with respect to some future-oriented criterion.
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