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Healthcare practitioners, patient safety leaders, educators and researchers increasingly recognise the value of human factors/ergonomics and make use of the discipline's person-centred models of sociotechnical systems. This paper first reviews one of the most widely used healthcare human factors systems models, the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model, and then introduces an extended model, 'SEIPS 2.0'. SEIPS 2.0 incorporates three novel concepts into the original model: configuration, engagement and adaptation. The concept of configuration highlights the dynamic, hierarchical and interactive properties of sociotechnical systems, making it possible to depict how health-related performance is shaped at 'a moment in time'. Engagement conveys that various individuals and teams can perform health-related activities separately and collaboratively. Engaged individuals often include patients, family caregivers and other non-professionals. Adaptation is introduced as a feedback mechanism that explains how dynamic systems evolve in planned and unplanned ways. Key implications and future directions for human factors research in healthcare are discussed.
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... On the other hand, over recent years patient safety as a scientific discipline has increasingly looked beyond Reason's model towards systems approaches, which are thought to be better suited for understanding and improving modern complex healthcare systems. Examples include the increasingly popular SEIPS model (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) (Carayon et al., 2020, Holden et al., 2013, which focuses on interactions between different elements of a work system, and the field of Resilient Health Care (Hollnagel et al., 2019), which is based on Resilience Engineering (RE) principles . Resilience Engineering was developed to better understand and manage safety in complex systems. ...
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Chapter
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In this paper, we discuss the transformation and initial analysis of user interface alert event data from intravenous infusion pumps to evaluate aspects of pump use.