Article

Teacher adoption of technology

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Technology adoption is usually modeled as a process with dynamic transitions between costs and benefits. Nevertheless, school teachers do not generally make effective use of technology in their teaching. This article describes a study designed to exhibit the interplay between two variables: the type of technology, in terms of its complexity of use, and the type of teacher, in terms of attitude towards innovation. The results from this study include: (a) elaboration of a characteristic teacher technology adoption process, based on an existing learning curve for new technology proposed for software development; and (b) presentation of exit points during the technology adoption process. This paper concludes that teachers who are early technology adopters and commit a significant portion of their time to incorporating educational technology into their teaching are more likely to adopt new technology, regardless of its complexity. However, teachers who are not early technology adopters and commit a small portion of their time to integrating educational technology are less likely to adopt new technology and are prone to abandoning the adoption at identified points in the process.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... This failure to integrate computing and science inquiry as a common instructional practice is frequently attributed to two major barriers (Bingimlas, 2009). First, teachers often lack sufficient content knowledge to span separate content areas such as science and computing (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Ertmer et al., 2012). Second, very few models of systematic integration are available to guide teachers' classroom practice (Kreijns et al., 2013;Repenning, 2012;Smolin & Lawless, 2007). ...
... As noted earlier, two major barriers exist to computing and science integration (Bingimlas, 2009). Because teachers often lack sufficient content knowledge to span separate content areas such as science and computing (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013), our project begins with integrated computer science and physical science content training for teachers. ...
... Prior research articulates specific barriers to classroom teacher integration of computing. Within science classrooms, teachers require increased content knowledge across computing and science content in order to effectively integrate them (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Ertmer et al., 2012). Without sufficient content knowledge in both areas, teachers are not able to engage the simultaneous instruction needed for integrated learning. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper shares findings from a teacher designed physics and computing unit that engaged students in learning physics and computing concurrently thru inquiry. Using scientific inquiry skills and practices, students were tasked with assessing the validity of local rollercoaster g-force ratings as posted to the public. Students used computational electronic textile circuits (e-textiles) to engage in “myth busting” amusement park g-force ratings. In doing so, students engaged computing and computational thinking skills in service to answering their scientific inquiry. Findings from this study indicate that physics classes are ideal spaces for engaging in computing’s Big Ideas as laid out by Grover and Pea (Educational Researcher 42, 38–43, 2013) as well as the pillars of computational thinking (Wing, Communications of the ACM 49, 33–35, 2006). However, essential to this dual engagement is a need for computing content to act in service to the better acquisition of physics content within the physics classroom space. Findings indicate that the teachers’ use of e-textiles to integrate physics and computing broadened and deepened student learning by providing affordances for computational thinking within the structure of physical science inquiry.
... Past studies have found that employees with a positive perception toward the utilization of technology can adapt the new technical skills with more ease [38]. Therefore, technology readiness can spur employees' motivation to adopt the technology and to influence their behavior to utilize the new technology [35], which will affect their work performance positively [19,34,35]. ...
... The result of the study has proven empirically that employees with a high tendency to utilize technology when performing their jobs can enhance their adaptive performance where they have the ability to adapt easily to changes in the high technology jobs. This finding is in line with the previous study about the positive perception of employees of the utilization of technology and the ability to enhance their own with new technical skills [38]. Employees' readiness to utilize technology also motivates them to accept the presence of technology in their jobs and this can have positive effects to their job performance in general [14,34,35]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The escalating utilization of digital technology has created new challenges and therefore calls for modifications in organizational culture, technology infrastructure and job structure. However, there is still a lack of research studies that view digital technology from the perspective of how challenges of digital technology can be addressed at the employee level. Transformation toward digitalization requires employees’ readiness to adapt to the new job structure. Adaptability is the employees’ ability to adapt to changes. Employees with adaptive performance can solve problems creatively, manage volatile situations and handle pressure effectively. Adaptive performance can be enhanced when employees are ready to adopt the utilization of digital technology or technology readiness. Technology readiness is the tendency of employees to use new technology to achieve goals related to their lives and work. However, an individual’s tendency to utilize digital technology varies depending on their perception of their job’s meaningfulness and the personality that the person has. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between employees’ technology readiness and adaptive performance, and to examine the role of job meaningfulness as a mediator and proactive personality as a moderator. Data was analyzed using the PLS-SEM. The results showed that employees with the tendency to utilize technology in their jobs have higher adaptive performance. Furthermore, the relationship is mediated by job meaningfulness and is enhanced by employees with highly proactive personalities. The findings from this study can drive organizations to motivate their employees and provide a flexible job structure to encourage the employees to utilize technology more effectively.
... Therefore online learning during confinement should be categorised as emergency and called emergency remote teaching due it does not follow any of the parameters set out in previous studies on how it should be prepared, planned and delivered, and there were no plans for large-scale online education in times of emergency (Zhang et al., 2020). In this regard, authors as Aldunate & Nussbaum (2013), Bates (2020), Prestridge et al. (2019), and Xi & Jaggers (2013), suggest several recommendations for the successful implementation of e-learning and an educational transformation such as getting professional advice and help before starting, organising and planning the process, following certain design guidelines, getting the right technology, avoiding long lectures, studying how it can influence our students in the various subjects and structuring the students' workload. It should not be forgotten that it is essential to analyse the relationship between digital technologies and pedagogical approaches in teaching and learning practices (Prestridge et al., 2019) and technological advances are changing students' learning behaviours and possibilities and have reshaped teaching methods (Chen et al., 2016). ...
... On the other hand, teachers in this pandemic have, in many ways, been ahead of the educational administration in trying to provide meaningful learning opportunities for their students (Osmond-Johnson et al., 2020). It is already known that the key to the success of technology as a tool for education is teacher competence (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). Some teachers have made the "e" in e-learning mean more than electronic, electronic but also efficient, exploratory, experiential, extended or even easy (Zhou et al., 2020). ...
Chapter
This chapter presents pedagogical adaptation in higher learning institutions (HLIs) during the pandemic in Tanzania. The study employed a phenomenological research design under the qualitative research approach. Twenty-four respondents, including university lecturers and students from five selected universities, participated in the study. Data collection used an unstructured interview guide. Data analysis employed content and thematic analysis methods. The findings revealed that universities employed different pedagogical approaches such as online learning, lecturing in small groups, and extending the timetable. Institutions supported pedagogical adaptation by building academic staff capacity to use online platforms and providing necessary facilities. Further, the main challenges were the digital divide among students and limited skills for both students and teachers to manage online learning. Future studies should investigate how programmes that require practical sessions such as engineering, agriculture, and vocational education implemented pedagogical innovations.
... These authors pointed out that the problem is that teachers lack the knowledge of how to teach content and current pedagogical methodologies, which weakens the effectiveness of the integration of technology in the curriculum. The second-order barriers that have been explored in Chile relate to issues with teachers' attitudes towards technology in the classroom (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013), teachers' pedagogical approaches and beliefs (Haas & Pino, 2014;Hepp et al., 2004;Hinostroza, Ibieta, Claro, & Labbé, 2016;Hinostroza et al., 2013); teachers' confidence in using technology in the classroom (Hepp et al., 2004); teachers' ability to use technology (Claro et al., 2013;Rodríguez, Nussbaum, & Dombrovskaia, 2012); teachers' adoption of technology (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013) (Hepp et al., 2004, p. 18). In this way, this study focusses on how teachers address the use of technology given beliefs, values, attitudes and skills from a self-perception perspective. ...
... These authors pointed out that the problem is that teachers lack the knowledge of how to teach content and current pedagogical methodologies, which weakens the effectiveness of the integration of technology in the curriculum. The second-order barriers that have been explored in Chile relate to issues with teachers' attitudes towards technology in the classroom (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013), teachers' pedagogical approaches and beliefs (Haas & Pino, 2014;Hepp et al., 2004;Hinostroza, Ibieta, Claro, & Labbé, 2016;Hinostroza et al., 2013); teachers' confidence in using technology in the classroom (Hepp et al., 2004); teachers' ability to use technology (Claro et al., 2013;Rodríguez, Nussbaum, & Dombrovskaia, 2012); teachers' adoption of technology (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013) (Hepp et al., 2004, p. 18). In this way, this study focusses on how teachers address the use of technology given beliefs, values, attitudes and skills from a self-perception perspective. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis examines Chilean student teachers' (ST) understanding of digital technology's pedagogic uses and primary classroom issues. Its initial assumption is that focusing on technology use in particular contexts is critical to understanding its effects on education and creating contextually appropriate pedagogies that can enhance students’ experiences. This work presents qualitative case studies of seven primary STs from a small city in southern Chile, exploring how they used and conceptualised technology and how they dealt with issues in their teaching practice. These aspects reflected their pedagogical understanding of the technologies used and their relationship with the educational context. The data collected comprised lesson plans, videos of classroom teaching, semi-structured interviews, audio recordings of supervision meetings and field notes from classroom observations, analysed thematically. The research revealed a pattern across cases. The intended and enacted pedagogies using technology supported existing teacher-centred approaches. The technology employed consisted of multimedia resources conceived to deliver and explain content, attract students' attention, and engage pupils in dialogic interactions. This perception of technology reveals a strong interest in maintaining discipline and learning environments in the classroom. The issues STs faced when using technology ranged from the inexistent digital culture at educational institutions to aspects of their agency and identity as teachers who use technology. This thesis uses the analysis to propose the Orchestration and Improvisation Pedagogical framework for integrating digital technology into teacher training. The framework aims to support STs in planning, implementing and reflecting on the uses of technology in synergy with the context. Using this framework, practitioners can evaluate different intertwined pedagogical aspects from research to practice. By foregrounding the importance of pedagogy and contextual reflection on technology application, these findings have value not only for STs and their teaching practice teams, but also for teacher-training programmes, educational policymakers and syllabus designers.
... The frustration of not having enough time was expressed by almost all the participants, as some of them clearly stated: "For teachers, there is never enough time to do what right for our students." This finding is supported by many research studies (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Kopcha, 2012;Wachira & Keengwe, 2011) that identified time as the main concern for teachers when using technology in classrooms. In fact, lack of time is one of the most cited issues regarding the use of technology in classrooms. ...
... In fact, lack of time is one of the most cited issues regarding the use of technology in classrooms. Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) noted that lack of time to plan and prepare for technology integration blocks teachers' efforts to use it in their teaching practices. To overcome these challenges, the participants believed that having more instructional time and reducing the teaching loads would help in more engagement in technology integration with gifted students. ...
Article
For gifted and talented students, differentiated instruction is a significant teaching approach to ensure that each student's needs and abilities are met. Research shows that technology can be used to facilitate the differentiation practices. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of Saudi teachers about using technology to differentiate instruction with gifted and talented students. The participants included Saudi teachers who are using technology as a tool to differentiate the instruction for gifted students. The findings indicated that technology is used to differentiate classroom instruction in different ways and for different purposes. Several academic and instructional benefits of using technology to differentiate instruction were reported, and the challenges that teachers encounter when applying differentiation through technology were identified.
... Adaptation to new technologies is generally a process of constant cost-benefit evaluation [9]. For instance, various factors, such as security, confidentiality, costeffectiveness, comfort, and the risk of malpractice, influence the perception of medical practitioners [10]. ...
... The original survey compiled 6 characteristic domains of the population and was validated using face and content validity methods. The original questionnaire had a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.73 [9]. Additionally, our instrument exhibited an acceptable KMO and a significant Bartlett and explained the variance of the 4 dimensions with a strong significant association. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background During the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple countries have taken measures, such as isolation and quarantine, to prevent person-to-person spread of disease. These actions forced many physicians to adopt new techniques, such as telemedicine, to continue patient care, which has proven to be useful in continued care for those with non-COVID-19 pathologies. Various factors, such as security, confidentiality, cost-effectiveness, comfort, and the risk of malpractice, influence the perception of telemedicine among medical practitioners. The aim of this study was to adapt an existing instrument and validate it into a new Spanish version. The instrument is about the perceptions and knowledge of telemedicine in healthcare professionals. Methods The original questionnaire surveyed 6 domains with 40 questions, and each question was measured with a five-point Likert scale ranging from very high [5] to very low [1]. The survey was translated to Spanish using machine translation. The translation was reviewed independently, and then, a consensus was achieved regarding minor changes in the syntax of the survey to facilitate understanding. After expert feedback and questionnaire review, the research team members proposed reducing the instrument to 13 items in 4 domains due to the similarity of some questions. The sample was divided into 2randomly selected groups. Eligibility criteria included physicians providing private or public services with active medical/clinical practice. Results In total, 382 surveys were collected and separated into two random samples, S1 and S2 (198 and 184, respectively). In exploratory factor analysis (EFA), the 13 items were grouped into four theoretical domains, and item 7 presented cross loading between factors and was removed. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to assess the scale reliability and interscale associations; three models were tested. Global Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency was 0.76 for the EFA. The goodness of fit measures root mean square error of approximation and comparative fit index were 0.009 and 0.999, respectively, for the best model. Conclusions The translated instrument was clear, with adequate internal consistency, readability, and appropriate for application in the physician setting. This validated questionnaire made it possible to evaluate physicians’ knowledge of telemedicine to increase its use, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.
... The study considers complexity of technology has a factor that will have a negative impact on adoption intention of teachers. Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) found that complexity has a negative impact on adoption intention of teachers'. Accordingly, the following hypothesis is proposed: H5: Complexity of technology has a negative influence on attitude of teachers' towards educational technology. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Covid-19 pandemic created widespread disruptions across industries including the education industry. Approximately 1.5 billion students were affected across 165 countries as schools and colleges were shut over the entire globe. Pandemic forced educators to adopt online mode of teaching and learning. This study attempts to determine the factors affecting teachers' attitude and their intention to use technology using the TAM model. Results indicate that perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and personal innovativeness have significant positive impact on teachers attitude and their intention to adopt technology. However, technology that is complex has a negative impact on attitude and adoption.
... Collaboration and leadership, as contextual characteristics, refer to teachers' collaboration, their support through professional development within schools, and a joint agreement about ICT priorities in the school (Kennisnet, 2011). Empirical evidence has shown that relevant collaborative professional development can lead to improvement in teachers' use of ICT for instruction (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2012;Kim et al., 2012), especially through collaborative forms of learning (Kopcha, 2012;Thoma et al., 2017). Teachers need to observe similar others (e.g., colleagues) carrying out the tasks and Page 6 of 28 Lomos et al. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The large-scale International Computer and Information Literacy Study (2018) has an interesting finding concerning Luxembourg teachers. Luxembourg has one of the highest reported level of technology-related resources for teaching and learning, but a relatively lower reported use of ICT in classroom practice. Methods ICT innovation requires a high initial level of financial investment in technology, and Luxembourg has achieved this since 2015. Once the necessary financial investment in ICT technology has been made, the key question is what else matters to increase the use of ICT in teaching. To identify the relevant factors, we used the “Four in Balance” model, aimed explicitly at monitoring the implementation of ICT in schools. Results Using data for 420 teachers in Luxembourg, we identify that within such a technology-driven approach to digitalization, teachers’ vision of ICT use in teaching, level of expertise , and the use of digital learning materials in class are significant support factors. Leadership and collaboration , in the form of an explicit vision of setting ICT as a priority for teaching in the school, also prove to be important. Conclusions Through these findings, we show that the initial investment in school infrastructure for ICT needs to be associated in its implementation with teachers’ ICT-related beliefs, attitudes, and ICT expertise.
... For integrating technology in education/teaching, technology literacy and the use of technology in education must be taught in teacher education. There are many studies in the literature on the technology literacy of teachers and pre-service teachers (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Uerz et al., 2018;Webb & Cox, 2004). However, only some of these studies examine the variables of technology integration in education (Drent & Meelissen, 2008;Groth et al., 2007;Mishra & Koehler, 2006;Uerz et al., 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study focuses on the content of technology-related courses offered by teacher training institutions to determine the factors that will avoid technology integration in teacher education/training. Two methods are combined in the research. As a first step, the integration of technology in education/teaching models literature was analyzed, synthesized, and categories were created based on the critics. Next, technology-related courses in teacher training curricula were defined, the content of those courses was analyzed, and some content and suggestions were proposed for better technology-integrated courses. Even though literature indicates the most critical barriers to technology integration in education are hardware problems and the lack of technical infrastructure, one of the underlying factors is the teachers' inadequacy in ICT, the usage of technology in education, and technology integration literacy. These inadequacies are the result of the training curriculum deficiencies. There are three suggestions based on the findings and for further studies. The first one is to add courses and contents to the teacher-training curriculum as discussed in interpretation and discussion. Secondly, instructional technology courses should have specific content related to the content area. The syllabus should be developed with the cooperation of the content area teacher trainer for each subject area. Finally, as a part of curriculum development, these proposed courses and their content should be reevaluated for further studies.
... It is argued that using digital technologies is an important tool for designing and implementing a technology-enhanced curriculum and pedagogy (e.g., play-based learning) in early childhood settings [16]. However, several studies have reported high levels of technology stress or anxiety in teachers [17]- [19], although teachers" beliefs and attitudes are one of the key constructs of effective technology integration in promoting student learning [20]. For instance, Ferná ndez-Batanero et al."s [21] systematic review of the published literature from 2005 to 2019 reveals the impact of educational technology on the development of teachers" stress and anxiety in various forms. ...
Article
Full-text available
With the threat of future global pandemics and the possible necessity to mandate schools to transition to temporary online learning, it is imperative to provide kindergarten teachers with effective pedagogical practices using technological devices and resources in virtual classrooms. To address this challenge, this case study aims to discover the attitudes and beliefs towards digital screen-based technologies or resources in the virtual classroom, the benefits and challenges of teaching and learning in virtual kindergarten classrooms, the digital screen-based technological tools or resources FDK educators are currently implementing, how educators used the tools or resources to document play-based learning virtually, and what do educators need to integrate technology into their virtual pedagogical practices effectively. Using semi-structured interviews from 11 early childhood educators and one teacher-researcher from virtual kindergarten classrooms in Ontario, Canada, a thematic content analysis from the typed transcripts and reflective notes was adopted to generate emerging themes. The findings demonstrated that educators had a similar positive attitude towards technology in kindergarten as in other countries worldwide, the benefits and challenges of virtual teaching and learning, update on what types of technological devices and resources educators are using, especially in the virtual milieu, and ways to support successful technology integration into virtual pedagogical practices. The findings from this study, in conjunction with other current research, provide practical recommendations for virtual kindergarten educators, parents, school boards, and policymakers.
... This concern was justified because many teachers had to learn how to work with the application software before they could use its visual aids in the teaching process. Based on these results, teachers must have a positive attitude towards modern technology, as innovators and early adopters, according to Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013), in addition to adequate technical support at schools in case of any technical difficulties. Furthermore, teachers should be familiar not only with the teaching content of the application software but also with all technical issues. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Studies comparing the effect of dynamic and static visualization suggest a predominantly positive effect of dynamic visualization. However, the results of individual comparisons are highly heterogeneous. In this study, we assess whether dynamic visualization (3D models and animations) used in the experimental group has a stronger positive influence on the intrinsic motivation and learning outcomes of science students (Biology, Chemistry and Geology) than static visualization used in the control group, and whether selected variables (students’ gender, age, educational level, learning domain, and teacher personality) significantly affect the results. Results This study was conducted in 2019 with a sample of 565 students from Czech middle (aged 11–15 years) and high (aged 15–19 years) schools using the following research tools: Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, Intrinsic Motivation Inventory and knowledge tests. The results show that using 3D models and animations in the teaching process significantly increased the students’ intrinsic motivation for learning natural sciences (more specifically, its components (1) interest, (2) effort to actively participate in the educational process, (3) perceived competence and (4) understanding the usefulness of the subject matter), with a mean Hedges’ g = 0.38. In addition, students in the experimental group reached a significantly higher level of Chemistry knowledge than their peers in the control group. Furthermore, by moderator analysis, we identified three moderator variables, namely student age, instructional domain and teacher personality. These variables significantly affect intrinsic motivation in different ways. The strongest positive effect of dynamic visualizations was found among students aged 11–13, whereas the weakest positive effect was identified among students aged 14–16. Regarding instructional domain animations and 3D models, the strongest positive effect is found in Chemistry (g = 0.74) and Biology (g = 0.72), whereas the positive impact on Geology is significantly weaker (g = 0.45). Teacher personality was found to be a major moderator in student motivation, with significant differences (g = 0.40—1.24). Teachers’ attitude towards modern technology plays an important role concerning this effect. Conclusions Based on these findings, we conclude that 3D models and animations have a positive effect on students and that teachers should include these visual aids in their lessons. For this reason, teachers are encouraged to implement these dynamic visual aids in their lessons regardless of their beliefs, and to get an adequate support in the process of implementation if necessary.
... However, there is a discussion in the literature that education does not make use of technology as much as it should do (Fabry & Higgs, 1997). It was also argued that technical or technological knowledge and skills of teachers fall behind their pedagogical or content knowledge (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Howley, Wood, & Hough, 2011). To put it differently, even though teachers know required teaching methods and skills or they have enough content knowledge about their lessons, they do not have enough technical or technological knowledge, which negatively affects the transfer of knowledge to the students especially in technology-enhanced settings (Uzun, 2016). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Rapid scientific and technological improvements have a significant impact on every part of our lives. These improvements have also affected the way how we teach and learn. As a result of these improvements, the needs and expectations of students have changed. The use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classes has also gained importance and considerably affected English language teaching and learning processes. Therefore, language teachers’ use and integration of technology in classes has been inevitable. The improvements of technology and increase in its use in EFL classes have also changed the responsibilities and qualifications of teachers. In other words, EFL teachers should know how to plan and implement their lessons by using their technological knowledge and skills (Öz, 2015). Accordingly, it has become necessary to equip language teachers with the technical and technological knowledge at the teacher training programs. However, there is a discussion in the literature that education does not make use of technology as much as it should do (Fabry & Higgs, 1997). It was also argued that technical or technological knowledge and skills of teachers fall behind their pedagogical or content knowledge (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013; Howley, Wood, & Hough, 2011). To put it differently, even though teachers know required teaching methods and skills or they have enough content knowledge about their lessons, they do not have enough technical or technological knowledge, which negatively affects the transfer of knowledge to the students especially in technology-enhanced settings (Uzun, 2016). English Language Teaching (ELT), with no exception, does not make use of technology as desired despite its widely accepted benefits (Çelik & Aytın, 2014; Merç, 2015). In many classes, language teachers still use traditional teaching instructions and materials and have little or no opportunity to make use of digital teaching tools (Levy, 2009). Moreover, EFL teachers do not know how to use or integrate the technology into language classes and do not benefit from the technology in their teaching practices at a satisfying level for some reasons (Merç, 2015; Uzun, 2016). Therefore, this chapter aims to reveal the advantages of technology use in language teaching and the challenges pre- and in-service EFL teachers face in using and integrating technology into language classes in Turkey. Furthermore, this chapter will try to uncover the reasons behind the challenges and provide practical solutions to the challenges in using and integrating technology into language classes by reviewing the related literature.
... For teachers, the use of technology during this pandemic to maintain education continuity of education is expected to have a significant impact on the quality of learning. However, Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) found that teachers who are less exposed to technology or who rarely integrate educational technology are less likely to adopt new technology into their classroom instruction. There has been ample research investigating potential barriers that might contribute to teachers' reluctance to adopt new technology. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to describe the views of mathematics teachers in Indonesia on the distance learning barriers during the early Covid-19 pandemic. Specifically, this paper investigates the barriers that teachers view as significant in distance learning and efforts taken to overcome the barriers during the early Covid-19 pandemic. This study employed a descriptive research design involving 415 mathematics teachers by snowball sampling to fill out an online questionnaire. This study shows that barriers related to pedagogical dimensions were perceived as significant in distance learning during the early Covid-19 pandemic. Moreover, this study reveals that most of the teachers did some efforts that can be done by the teachers themselves to overcome the barriers. Based on the findings, we argue that it is important to support teachers’ pedagogical competencies to conduct distance learning in order to face this current pandemic or any future crises that may potentially disrupt face-to-face learning.
... While studies have indicated that technology integration improves teaching (Williams et al., 2004), facilitates students' learning (Enriquez, 2010) and allows teachers to create more student-centred classroom environment (Teo et al., 2008), others implied that teachers' beliefs and attitudes are one of the most important constructs of technology integration (Andrew, 2007;Kim et al., 2013). As the technology adoption process is positively related to teachers' attitude (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013), examining teacher educators' attitude towards the use of TEL in teacher education at the time of the pandemic is crucial. If teacher educators are intrinsically motivated to promote and integrate technology into their teaching-learning, the trainee teachers will also become adept in using technology in future classroom situations when they take on the role as teachers. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the findings of a research study on the attitude of Indian teacher educators towards technology-enabled learning (TEL); if any age, gender, teaching position, and mode of teaching differences existed in their attitude; and their attitude to TEL post-pandemic when the imposed remote teaching may cease to exist. An online survey was conducted on 20 teacher education institutions, to which 112 educators responded. The results indicated that teacher educators had positive attitude towards TEL generally; that age, gender and teaching position did not influence their attitude to TEL, though open and distance learning (ODL) teacher educators showed more positive attitude than their campus-based counterparts. Their attitude towards use of TEL, post-Covid, focused more on the parameters of open educational resources (OER), institutional repository, multimedia-based teaching, and faculty capacity building. The results have been discussed in relation to previous research studies, the existing teacher education policy, and institutional contexts of teacher education.
... Our work assumes that computational technology can contribute to teachers' knowledge and sense of efficacy, but TAM tells us that to influence adoption we should focus on usability and usefulness. While we know that this is insufficient to predict teacher adoption (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Zhao & Cziko, 2001), it is a reasonable starting place. We recognize that there are interactions between specific technologies and the contexts for which they are designed. ...
Article
In this study, support for teaching data literacy in social studies is provided through the design of a pedagogical support system informed by participatory design sessions with both pre‐service and in‐service social studies teachers. It provides instruction on teaching and learning data literacy in social studies, examples of standards‐based lesson plans, made‐to‐purpose data visualization tools and minimal manuals that put existing online tools in a social studies context. Based on case studies of eleven practicing teachers, this study provides insight into features of technology resources that social studies teachers find usable and useful for using data visualizations as part of standards‐ and inquiry‐based social studies instruction, teaching critical analysis of data visualizations and helping students create data visualizations with online computing tools. The final result, though, is that few of our participating teachers have yet adopted the provided resources into their own classrooms, which highlights weaknesses of the technology acceptance model for describing teacher adoption. Practitioner notes What is already known about this topic Data literacy is an important part of social studies education in the United States. Most teachers do not teach data literacy as a part of social studies. Teachers may adopt technology to help them teach data literacy if they think it is useful and usable. What this paper adds Educational technology can help teachers learn about data literacy in social studies. Social studies teachers want simple tools that fit with their existing curricula, give them new project ideas and help students learn difficult concepts. Making tools useful and usable does not predict adoption; context plays a large role in a social studies teachers' adoption. Implications for practice and/or policy Designing purpose‐built tools for social studies teachers will encourage them to teach data literacy in their classes. Professional learning opportunities for teachers around data literacy should include opportunities for experimentation with tools. Teachers are not likely to use tools if they are not accompanied by lesson and project ideas. What is already known about this topic Data literacy is an important part of social studies education in the United States. Most teachers do not teach data literacy as a part of social studies. Teachers may adopt technology to help them teach data literacy if they think it is useful and usable. What this paper adds Educational technology can help teachers learn about data literacy in social studies. Social studies teachers want simple tools that fit with their existing curricula, give them new project ideas and help students learn difficult concepts. Making tools useful and usable does not predict adoption; context plays a large role in a social studies teachers' adoption. Implications for practice and/or policy Designing purpose‐built tools for social studies teachers will encourage them to teach data literacy in their classes. Professional learning opportunities for teachers around data literacy should include opportunities for experimentation with tools. Teachers are not likely to use tools if they are not accompanied by lesson and project ideas.
... The first factor that affects the adoption of a blended model corresponds to the teacher's profile (Table 39. 7). This result is consistent with previous studies by Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013), who indicated that the teacher's profile will positively or negatively impact the success of educational innovation. Likewise, Almerich et al. (2016) pointed out that teachers are crucial in introducing ICT into educational practice. ...
Book
This book contains peer-reviewed selected papers of the 7th International Conference on Educational Innovation (CIIE 2020). It presents excellent educational practices and technologies complemented by various innovative approaches that enhance educational outcomes. In line with the Sustainable Development Goal 4 of UNESCO in the 2030 agenda, CIIE 2020 has attempted to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.” The CIIE 2020 proceeding offers diverse dissemination of innovations, knowledge, and lessons learned to familiarize readership with new pedagogical-oriented, technology-driven educational strategies along with their applications to emphasize their impact on a large spectrum of stakeholders including students, teachers and professors, administrators, policymakers, entrepreneurs, governments, international organizations, and NGOs.
... Remote consultations have been shown to be a useful tool during the COVID-19 pandemic, 20,21 but the long-term consequences of remote care for patients with CU in terms of costs, benefits, impact on physician/patient relation, data protection and confidentiality, comfort, risk of malpractice, and effectiveness of disease management remain to be characterized. 22,23 CURICT, a recent UCARE study of the use of Internet and communication technologies (ICTs) by patients with urticaria, found that almost all CU patients have access to ICTs and that most patients use ICTs regularly to obtain CU-related information. 24 As for the interaction of patients with their physicians, WhatsApp and email were the preferred ICTs, similar to patients with asthma or cancer. ...
... The TPACK proficiency in language teaching is highly related to the integration of technology (Bostancıoğlu & Handley, 2018;İşler & Yıldırım, 2018;Paneru, 2018). The use of technology in teaching learning process is a factor which is expected to have an impact on the quality of the learning experience (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). The support of technologies in the development of language skills is undeniable (Golonka, Bowles, Frank, Richardson, & Freynik, 2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, it was attempted to determine the technological pedagogical content knowledge proficiency (TPACK) perceptions of preservice teachers who will teach a foreign language. This study, which was designed as a general survey model, included preservice teachers who will carry out language education. The proficiency and efficiency levels of preservice teachers were determined concerning certain variables such as gender, department, receiving technology education, having access to internet, ability to use computer, searching for new technologies particular to the field, and ability to use these new technologies in the teaching activities. It was detected that they had the proficiency for TPACK. It was also determined that there was statistically no significant difference between the general TPACK proficiency levels of the students and the gender variable. It was determined that gender had no impact on the TPACK general proficiency levels of the students. It was determined that there were statistically significant differences among the TPACK general proficiency levels concerning department, receiving technology education, having access to internet, ability to use computer, searching for new technologies particular to the field, and ability to use these new technologies in the teaching activities. It was also found that these variables had impacts on the preservice teachers to have the TPACK proficiency concerning the selected languages, which were included in the study.
... Some previous studies considered adoption upon the request of the institution and with a limited number of teachers (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Ching & Hursh, 2014;Porter & Graham, 2016). However, the obligatory nature of the innovation was unique in this study. ...
Article
Full-text available
During the Covid-19 pandemic, higher education shifted from face-to-face to online education and teachers had various perspectives about remedying the challenges of this mandatory situation. Drawing on the diffusion of innovation theory as a theoretical lens to better understand the change in the adoptions of the faculty during the pandemic, we surveyed 307 academics with an online questionnaire. The results indicated that the adopters in this study were innovators (11%), early adopters (23%), early majority (18%), late majority (22%), and laggards (26%), revealing somewhat different percentages from the values in the theoretical model. This can be explained by the fact that innovations that require an emergency situation bring about changes in the values of the adopter categories. Examining the questionnaire data, we categorised the results as support, functionality, guidance, interaction, adaptation and the features of synchronous lessons influencing the diffusion of innovation during the new emergency teaching condition. The adoption process was discussed through the factors influencing these dimensions. The implications of notable findings and directions for future studies have been provided. Implications for practice or policy: Academics may have better online learning experiences in various designs and applications at universities. Academics may be prepared for unexpected teaching situations with adequate and appropriate organisational, technical and learning support to achieve quality outputs. All educational institutions, academics, and universities in particular, can be guided to adopt technologies more easily and quickly in such situations as future pandemics, wars, etc.
... However, despite these challenges, teachers were able to identify ways to overcome them. Training teachers in the use of technology has been identified as the key to the success of the technology adoption process in education (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). There are more opportunities to explore innovative solutions to overcome limitations, including designing effective online curricula and properly planning and scheduling activities based on observable learning experiences and outcomes (Zayapragassarazan, 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
We open this new issue for the pandemic year 2022 with articles now indexed in Index Copernicus International in addition to our being indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Crossref, and Asean Citation Index (ACI). Being indexed in these international databases will guarantee more global visibility and accessibility and enhance the citation generation of all published articles in the Philippine Social Science Journal. With that positive note, I am proud to introduce the first quarter journal issue (Volume 5Number 1, January-March 2022). Employing varied quantitative and qualitative approaches, 11 interesting papers explored various topics on politics, educational tourism, well-being, lived experiences of students at risk of dropping out in printed modular distance learning modality, teaching competence of pre-service teachers, learning science process skills and Mathematics during pandemic, digital transformation of the teaching and learning process, risk factors of pneumonia, valuation methods, and cooperatives’ perceived effectiveness in terms of financial and social performance.
... Accordingly, these beliefs about teaching and learning have a great impact on teachers' behavior and performance, and subsequently their practice (Davis et al., 2006). Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) found that teachers who incorporated technologies were more likely to continue with more complicated systems rather than abandoning them altogether. In terms of educators, Goldstein et al. (2013) define mindsets as "assumptions and expectations we have for ourselves and others that guide our teaching practices and our interactions with students, parents, and colleagues" (p. ...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, school closures were mandated by governments across the globe. This necessitated an abrupt shift to online/distance teaching. Through a mixed-methods study, the authors explored STEM teachers’ transition to online teaching and learning in a Canadian context. This subset of the larger study investigated (i) teachers’ views of and attitude toward online teaching and (ii) successes and challenges encountered with online teaching. Data were collected through an online questionnaire administered to 70 Grade 1–12 science/STEM subject teachers in a Canadian province between May and July 2020. Findings are discussed through the lens of self-efficacy theory and the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Results indicate that despite few successes, teachers faced a wide array of challenges that negatively affected their attitudes and views toward online teaching, and that the support received did not parallel their expectations. Teachers’ experiences, self-efficacy, and technological competency slightly enhanced their views of online teaching but were not sufficient to shift their mindset. Recommendations include effective professional development initiatives and support for teachers to facilitate teachers’ transition and enhance their personal views toward online teaching.
... -Students can access the survey online at a time and place that is convenient for them (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). -The Internet is an undeniable tool offering the best response times (Moscarola & Ganassali, 2006). ...
Article
Full-text available
The covid-19 pandemic has forced many education systems around the world to adopt e-learning as a mode of teaching and learning to limit the spread of the virus. Some universities and schools were already prepared while others were not. This paper presents a study conducted by a self-administered questionnaire. Its objective is to study the higher education student's perception of the usefulness and of the ease of use of e-learning in Morocco during the covid-19 pandemic period. Likewise, this study aims to investigate the impact of the previous two determinants on the intention to use e-learning as a learning mode after the current health crisis. Results showed that there are four categories of students: the supporters of e-learning, the opponents of e-learning, conditional supporters and the grateful one. Also, results show that the acceptance of e-learning and the intention of its use in the future by students for their learning is impacted positively by their perception of its ease of use and usefulness, which in turn is affected positively by its perceived ease of use.
... TCK TPACK PCK TK CK PK As technology has started to support teaching and learning, the knowledge and the skills of the teachers for efficient integration of technology become more important. The capacity of teachers to adapt to any changes, including technology, is expected to increase the quality of teaching and learning (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Cansiz & Cansiz, 2019). On the other hand, Jang and Tsai (2012) emphasized that the use of new technology in the teaching process requires adequate technological knowledge associated with pedagogical content knowledge. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examined the profile of Turkish preservice science and elementary teachers in terms of their technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). Moreover, the difference between TPACK of preservice teachers in terms of grade level, gender, Cumulative Grand Point Average (CGPA), participation in a technology-related course, and following a popular technology magazine were investigated. The Survey of Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Teaching and Technology was administered to 202 preservice teachers of a state university in Turkey. The results indicated that the participants had above-average TPACK scores. In addition, the influence of grade level, gender, and CGPA on TPACK scores is not significantly different for preservice science teachers and preservice elementary teachers. On the other hand, the influence of participation in a technology-related course and following a popular technology magazine on TPACK scores is significantly different for both groups in favor of preservice elementary teachers. The results and implications were discussed.
... With a different research perspective, some works aimed to investigate the protagonism of the teacher, considered as one of the most determining factors for the significant use of digital technologies in teaching and learning (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Drent & Meelissen, 2008;Sing & Chan, 2014). These studies have highlighted the commitment made by the individual subject, who would be conditioned by the perception of responsibility towards the students' results or the search for personal satisfaction. ...
Article
Full-text available
Technological determinism, techno-solutionism and instrumental perspectives on technologies have populated educational research literature in the last decades, and even more since the pandemic crisis has started. This essay offers a critique about simplistic explanations of technology adoption in pedagogy by using insights from critical philosophy of technology and feminist new materialism. It rejects the assumption of teachers' resistance to change and proposes a frame to expand future imaginaries of education. In this sense, critical studies provide a focus on human activity as interconnected with social and situated knowledges/practices. The emphasis is on recursive relations that allow educational researchers and practitioners to take into account the considerable complexity of digital technologies pedagogical adoption. On the other hand, feminist new materialism brings about a new focus on relational ontology, which adds to the critical theoretical framework the agentic element. By overcoming a binary way of seeing technologies through utopias and dystopias, new materialist studies focus on ethics and responsibility. We argue that we need both a critical and neo-materialist view, in order to adopt technologies in education in meaningful, productive and creative ways. Building on small narratives and possible utopias can take us to redesign and re-interpret the future of educational technologies.
... The sooner the teachers become acquainted with technology, the better they can cope with it and use it in their daily activities (Aldunate and Nussbaum, 2013). As a result, students will be able to face the challenging tasks that take place in real contexts (Kaya et al., 2017), it increases students' interest in STEM (Chalmers, 2017;Park & Han, 2016) and fosters technical and scientific skills (Chioccariello, 2009). ...
Article
This study systematically reviews the literature concerning structured training experiences with Educational Robotics (ER) by in-service teachers (ISTs) and pre-service teachers (PSTs). The sixteen papers selected highlight the relevance of these courses in order to update professional identity and to support professional development (PD) beginning with undergraduate education. Through these training sessions, both ISTs and PSTs adapted and integrated their knowledge about robotics and the pedagogy behind it, coming to understand the benefits that new technologies can offer. Therefore, they built a positive attitude towards ER and enhanced their self-efficacy. This enables teachers to properly integrate ER in the classroom, using a more conscious and less obsolete methodology. Consequently, they become, together with their students, active codesigners of the educational process. Finally, improvements in teaching methods and contents will significantly impact on the learning process, especially in terms of motivation and inclusion. International Journal of Social Science and Technology (ISSN: 2415-6566)
... Further, education traditional beliefs makes adoption more complicated (Honey & Moeller, 1990). Nonetheless, attention towards the adoption has been scarce, to which we need to understand that the process for adaptability process cannot be done immediately, and be applied and extended over a significant time duration (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). To this, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) proposed by Devis in 1989 has been largely been conceived as a source to explain technology adoption practices by users in numerous business and commercial organizations which has also been applied for defining educational contexts with technological refinements (Alharbi & Drew, 2014;Hsu & Ching, 2013;Sánchez & Hueros, 2010;Huang, Lin, & Chuang, 2007). ...
Article
Full-text available
Sudden rise in the pandemic has also revolutionized the teaching practices amidst of lock down practices which have led the universities and institutions to adopt technology systems as a source of connectivity to students and impart education. However the haphazard implementation of technological practices has levied a stress upon deliverability by faculties especially in tourism and hospitality which is more a practical based concept. Keeping in view the current scenario of teaching and learning practices, the current study examines factors associated with the technological adoption in tourism and hospitality faculty. Where the technological acceptance model describes the adoption for technology in teaching practices, results for structural constraints associated with it cannot be neglected. So to understand how to sustain technology use, there is a requirement for understanding what influences adoption process among teachers and how such factors determine their future intentions. Accordingly an online survey was conducted from faculties of tourism and hospitality of various universities and institutes in India. About 355 responses which were found reliable were used for final analysis. SEM analysis revealed that the relationship between self-efficacy, perceived ease of use at one hand have direct significant impact on intentions for future use, the structure constraints also mediates the relationship between the self-efficacy and intention to use thereby reflecting a significant role in technology adoption practices. The research will help in filling up the theoretical as well as implications for tourism education system and technological adoption practices where while technological training and digital familiarity programs needs to be implemented play as structural factors induces a significant impression on online pedagogical system in India.
... The integration of information and communication technology is one of the added values included in 21 st -century teaching. Furthermore, integrating technology into teaching can promote student learning and teacher productivity (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013). There are still research reports stating that teaching aids are still not enough, especially those involving the latest Information and Communication Technology (Yasin et al., 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
Islamic Education’s formal teaching and learning for deaf students in schools are based on the Special Education Curriculum. In order to improve the achievement in the teaching and learning of deaf students, teachers should utilize teaching aids that are appropriate to the learning content and the students’ ability. The objective of this study is to explore the use of teaching aids by teachers teaching Islamic Education subjects to deaf students at the primary school level in Selangor. This study utilized the qualitative approach in the form of case studies by using the interview technique and document analysis to obtain data. Seven teachers from schools offering the Special Education Integration Program (Program Pendidikan Khas Integrasi) and one teacher from the Special Education School (Sekolah Pendidikan Khas) were selected as study respondents. The study respondents were selected based on the purposive sampling technique and had at least five years of teaching experience in Islamic Education subjects to deaf students. The findings showed there were several main types of teaching aids used by the respondents. They were printed materials, the use of Information and Communication Technology and by-product materials. The study also discovered several challenges faced by the respondents when using the teaching aids such as lack of appropriate and limited materials as well as the information and communication technology software was less friendly to deaf students in the learning of Islamic Education. This study contributes in terms of the recommendations of the production of appropriate teaching aids in order to assist teachers in teaching and helping to improve students’ achievement in Islamic Education learning.
... The intentional and unintentional diffusion of educational innovations relating to educational practices and resources has been shown to occur through professional social media use where teachers both share, and are exposed to innovations (Davis, 2015;Krutka et al., 2016). Further, Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) found a lack of exposure to innovators and early adopters of technology increases the incidence of innovation abandonment. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Limited research exists on practicing secondary teacher's use of professional learning networks (PLN) and their role in teacher's professional learning continuum. The purpose of this research was to identify California agriculture teacher's perceived usefulness of social media in their professional learning. Adult learners are unique in several ways: need to know, the learner’s self-concept, unique life experiences, willingness to learn, desired teaching method and motivating factors. Because social media provides a platform that allows educators to network with other professionals in a way that facilitates the exploration of their personal learning objectives and other characteristics of adult learners, it should be considered professional learning. A digital survey utilizing a Likert scale was distributed to a sample of 464 California agriculture teachers, 164 teachers completed the instrument. Constructs of perceived usefulness of professional social media use, as well as their perceived usefulness of school-sponsored professional learning were compared to social media engagement and several other demographic characteristics relating to the teacher and their teaching assignment. Although there was variation in perceived usefulness of social media in relation to gender, age group, career phase, and teaching assignment, there was no difference between groups by credential type, highest degree, and teacher isolation. There was also a significant difference between teachers' perceived usefulness of professional social media use when compared to their school-sponsored professional learning. Predictors for perceived social media use were perceived usefulness of school-sponsored professional learning, social media use, participation in content-specific professional learning, career stage, and teaching assignment. The findings of this study quantitatively support literature relating to teachers’ positive behaviors and attitudes toward social media use in their professional learning.
... Similarly, because learning is a complex process involving a variety of psychological factors, such as self-efficacy, emotional state, motivation, and interest (among others), these have been recently suggested to improve identification of at-risk students in some courses [4], [55]. Hence, although most of these nonacademic factors are not collected in daily teaching practice and time-consuming surveys are required [12], [56], some will be analyzed in future offerings of the course. Moreover, data from student's interaction with the used e-learning platform will also be included in these further studies. ...
Article
Early warning systems (EWSs) have proven to be useful in identifying students at risk of failing both online and conventional courses. Although some general systems have reported acceptable ability to work in modules with different characteristics, those designed from a course-specific perspective have recently provided better outcomes. Hence, the main goal of this work is to design a tailored EWS for a conventional course in power electronic circuits. For that purpose, effectiveness of some common classifiers in predicting at-risk students has been analyzed. Although slight differences in their performance have only been noticed, an ensemble classifier combining outputs from several of them has provided to be the best performer. As a major contribution, a novel weighted voting combination strategy has been proposed to exploit global information about how basic prediction algorithms perform on several time points during the semester and diverse subsets of student-related features. Predictions at five critical points have been analyzed, revealing that the end of the fourth week is the optimal time to identify students at risk of failing the course. At that moment, accuracies about 85-90% have been reached. Moreover, several scenarios with different subsets of student-related attributes have been considered in every time point. Besides common parameters from students background and continuous assessment, novel features estimating students performance progression on weekly assignments have been introduced. The proposal of this set of new input variables is another key contribution, because they have allowed to improve more than 5% predictions of at-risk students at every time point.
... Prospective Adopters, on the other hand, have positive attitudes and intentions to use mobile technology, but low knowledge. Research has suggested that the absence of innovators and early adopters negatively impacts the likelihood of technology adoption by instructors [1]. Therefore, professional development, supported by Technology Enthusiasts and Knowledgeable Adopters, focused on showing "how" to use mobile technology and providing practical knowledge and skills would be especially helpful for Prospective Adopters. ...
Article
Full-text available
The need for entirely online instruction as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has raised many questions about university faculty readiness for online instruction and how to effectively support university faculty in integrating mobile technology into their practice. Previous research suggests subtypes of university faculty technology integration and in turn, a need for diversified approaches to professional development. However, such research is both limited and contested, and thus further research is needed. This multistudy examined whether there are qualitatively distinct faculty subtypes for mobile technology integration (Study 1: N = 83, Study 2: N = 45) based on their knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes towards mobile technology, and whether such subtypes, if indeed were present, were meaningfully associated with an adoption of mobile technology in the following semester. Findings from the latent profile analysis suggest five university faculty subtypes: Technology Enthusiasts, Knowledgeable Adopters, Prospective Adopters, Knowledgeable Skeptics, and Non-Adopters. Study 2 validates Study 1 findings. Findings illustrate that technology professional development opportunities only have value for certain university faculty groups and that resources would be better targeted elsewhere for faculty groups such as non-adopters. We discuss the implications of these findings for future efforts to support university faculty mobile technology integration.
... Their primary focus was derived on the basis of the premise that teachers are required to acquire technological competency to use it effectively in the instructional approaches. Regarding evaluation, several studies have presented instruments to evaluate the technological competencies of teachers differently, but their main focus remained on teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and adaptation (Ertmer, 2005;Aldunate and Nussbaum, 2013;Kim et al., 2017). The complementary fact in various studies was that they comprised only one of the components of the concept. ...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic significantly shifted education from traditional to an online version, which was an emergent state for teachers and students. The substantive situation thus raises the importance of technology integration in education, and teachers are required to update their competencies, respectively. In this regard, the study assessed online teaching competencies of faculty members following, technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) model. Closed-ended surveys were employed for quantitative analysis of randomly selected 256 faculty members from public universities in Karachi, Pakistan. Results indicated that teachers possessed adequate levels of knowledge across all the domains of TPACK. The highest competency was obtained by content knowledge (CK), while technological knowledge (TK) was reported at the lowest level. Furthermore, a significant difference was noted in terms of gender and teaching experience. Correspondingly, the study proposes that the TPACK model should be employed in the professional development programs to develop teachers’ TPACK for integrating information communication and technology in the pedagogical practices. The findings of the study present a constructive overview of teachers’ digital competencies and technology use in teaching and learning in the time of the COVID-19 and also play a significant role in the integration of technology in the post-pandemic time in higher education. The study also suggests relevant educational authorities and policymakers for assessing and enhancing the technological competencies of teachers for quality online education.
... According to (Sharma, 2016), it is crucial to integrate technology into effective and efficient learning. The article (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013) titled "Teacher adoption of technology" concluded that teachers who adopted early in using technology in their teaching have more likely better outcomes for their learners. ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose - This study aimed to develop a virtual learning environment system for a state university extension office that captivated and stimulated learners' imagination anytime, anywhere, using any device. The design provided distance training to the community in livelihood/technical-vocational/skills training, basic education training, communication and dissemination of knowledge, and gender sensitivity training. Method - The development followed the CDIO Framework known as conceive, design, implement, and operate. An evaluation process was conducted using the ISO/IEC 9126-1 or the Software Evaluation Criteria rated by the IT experts. Results –Both experts strongly agreed on the system's usability, maintainability, and sustainability and are easy to use with robust functions and support. The study found out that both experts recommended the utilization as they believed the system is beneficial in terms of academic learning objectives for the extension programs. Conclusion – The assessment of the IT experts from industry and academe helped in the rating of quality software. The CDIO framework is very efficient and effective that produced quality software products. Lastly, the system allows users to boost their training to upland areas fully and maximize time. Recommendation – It is highly recommended that other techniques may be used to improve the system. This would upgrade the developed system's current features, especially on video conferences, as it found out that the institution must have a suitable server for video conferences upon utilization. Thus, improvement or integration of available video conferencing platforms is recommended. Practical Implication - University may use the system for other academic activities such as classes, video conferences, and a different process that uses any of the communication tools. The University may formulate a policy on the usage of the system and how it is being used to any unit of the school.
... Issues and Trends in Learning Technologies Volume 9, Number 1, May 2021 technology course that lacks an infusion of technology into curriculum and methods needed for adequate application (Foulger et al., 2019). Personal and institutional barriers can also impede effective technology use, such as a lack of confidence or competence with technology, anxiety when implementing new technologies in front of students, and time needed for professional development to support teachers (Aldunate & Nussbaum, 2013;Kim et al., 2013;Kurt, 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
This mixed methods study examined preservice teacher perspectives on the impact of using untethered lecture capture (ULC) as an instructional technology in a teacher preparation course, both on learning experiences as students and confidence using technology as teachers. Results found statistically significant (p < .05) increases in confidence using technology as a teaching tool. Additionally, Darling-Hammond et al.'s (2018) Teacher Preparation for Deeper Learning framework was utilized to analyze qualitative data to explore the impact of ULC on preservice teacher learning. Challenges and recommendations for effective implementation of ULC, based on participant feedback, are provided. This study contributes to research on using technology in teacher preparation programs to enhance the teaching and learning process for preservice educators and is grounded in the TPACK model (Mistra & Koehler, 2009).
... This finding apparently conflicts with indications from Morris and Venkatesh (2000) and Morris et al. (2005), who suggested that older individuals tend to be less open to new technologies adoption in particular. The adoption level of both ICTs and teaching practices appears to be more dependent on OM lecturers'/professors' characteristics, such as teaching experience and subject type, converging to findings from Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013). This result somewhat demystifies certain assumptions associated with the availability of capital and human resources that may significantly vary among departments and universities in emerging economies. ...
Article
The objective of this article is three-fold. First, it aims at identifying the main teaching practices and information and communication technologies (ICTs) used to teach Operations Management (OM) in emerging economies during COVID-19 outbreak. Second, it investigates the effect of contextual characteristics on the adoption level of those teaching practices and ICTs. Third, this study examines the relationship between the adoption of ICTs and OM teaching practices during COVID-19 outbreak. Expectedly, schools around the world have pivoted to online learning and digital classrooms. Thus, OM lecturers and professors located in emerging economies that have been teaching during COVID-19 outbreak were surveyed. The collected data was analyzed through multivariate techniques. Findings indicate that lecturers and professors have been remarkably adopting specific teaching practices and ICTs to teach OM. Nevertheless, when considering the contextual characteristics of the universities, departments, and lecturers/professors, the adoption level of those practices and ICTs may significantly vary, especially depending on subject type and teaching experience. Moreover, we empirically verified that ICTs positively relate with OM teaching practices in emerging economies, although in a much less extent than expected. This research provides OM instructors guidelines to better plan their courses and subjects in face of extreme disruptive moments, such as the one caused by the COVID-19. Understanding how the concurrent utilization of ICTs and teaching practices helps OM programs to continue developing their activities is particularly important for universities located in emerging economies, since they are more likely to struggle with resources scarcity and more financially humble students.
... Only recently, researchers have begun focusing on IS discontinuance as a phenomenon distinct from IS continuance. For example, the continuance behavior of the users of group support system has different antecedents than those predicting its abandonment [63], and technology characteristics had different effects on teachers' IS continuance and abandonment intentions [3]. The research found that higher perceptions of SNS switchingexhaustion [58] and SNS-exhaustion [19] are significant predictors of SNS abandonment intentions. ...
Article
Full-text available
The herd behavior of technology users, i.e., adopters observe the decisions (but not the reasoning) of prior adopters and imitate their system usage behaviors, is prominentin the information technology (IT) industry. However, such en mass adoptions areprone to be fragile. Adopters may reverse their decisions, after an initial adoption, andabandon system use when updated contradictory information is presented. This phenomenon of herd-like abandonment, at both individual and organizational levels, is significant and requires more investigation, since it is connected to the durability of particular products and technologies in the marketplace. In addition, IS behaviors of users at the later phases of IS life cycle, i.e., termination phase, are the primary source of benefit for organizations. This study develops and empirically validates a theoretical model of IS abandonment in a herding context. We test our model via a longitudinal research design, which surveys adopters at two different points in time. The study examines the determinants of adopters’ abandonment intentions, which occure specially after an initial en mass adoption (i.e., a herding setting). Results suggest that post-adoptive task-technology fit, perceptions of niche, and observation of a criticalmass of abandoners are all salient factors affecting IS abandonment intentions.
... Kundu (2021) finds a mismatch between espoused theories of ET/ICT and theories in use meaning the empirical evidences of how learning takes place with ET integration and institutions/teachers perceived of teaching. Aldunate and Nussbaum (2013) have rightly pointed out that there has been an increase in the availability of ICT tools in schools at the same time there is an indication that teachers are not using these as expected. Besides this cognitive or perceptual mismatch there are several factors influencing technology adoptions in education that needs a discussion here before heading towards the content analysis which are as Ertmer (1999) found more or less the same irrespective of countries or cultures. ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The pandemic arrival of COVID-19 has brought educational technology (ET) especially Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into the limelight among academicians, students, and policymakers. In this backdrop, it will be pertinent to analyze the provisions for ET adoption in the NEP 2020 that has come up with a lot of hope and aspirations after a long gap of 24 years replacing the earlier National Policy of Education 1986 to give vision to the Indian education for the upcoming few decades. Method: In this rational content analysis three basic aspects of NEP 2020 - pedagogical, institutional, the human factor - have been decoded, the significance of these factors has been established in existing literature, and their alignment in the Policy has been evaluated. Findings: The outcomes revealed that this vision document is no doubt successful in capturing an overall view of the technology adoption. All three factors have been attended, moreover, the advanced mindset that the policy exhibits with greater emphasis on the dematerialization and digitalization of content are hitherto a remarkable feat in the conservative Indian educational system. Few concerns have also been raised relating to the implementation of this policy, especially at the institutional level. Besides concerns regarding issues of human elements like developing skills among teachers, collaboration, developing group mindset, and efficacy have also been evolved. Implication: This analysis is well-intentioned from the point of view of review, restructure, and renovation. Few recommendations that the authors come up with for institutional strengthening by forming the Working School Governing Bodies (WSGBs) and practicing the 3-E Model may open up a new vista of ET integration. Keywords: NEP 2020, Educational technology, Pedagogy, Institution, Human factors
Chapter
As a result of the confinement caused by COVID-19, different educational institutions have had to resort to distance education to continue their students’ education and learning processes. This has accelerated the adoption of educational technologies and the incorporation of hybrid learning or blended learning strategies. To date, most studies that have evaluated these types of strategies have focused on promoting self-regulatory skills in higher education. However, it is necessary to understand what its adoption in secondary education implies. Along these lines, this work presents a case study of vulnerable schools in Chile. The work focused on identifying the variables that facilitate the adoption of a blended learning model by their teachers. The results revealed the importance of the teachers’ profile to include the ability to incorporate technology into their classrooms and perform the instructional design necessary to adopt this type of model.
Article
Full-text available
Digital education is mostly a new idea from the last few decades, though it existed in different forms a little earlier. With the digitalization of some parts of the system, big changes are coming to the educational system soon. These changes will help protect against natural and man-made pandemics like Covid-19 in 2020. It is all possible because of the internet and other electronic media. Online learning is available on many platforms, such as MOOCs, YouTube, social media, Telegram, and others. MOOCs are the most popular way to learn online, and they offer degrees just like traditional schools. This paper will look at digital education in In-dia, including its goals, perspectives, and problems with changing paradigms, as well as the problems that will come up as a result of its inclusion in the NEP-2020.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Being inventive and creative in offering effective and efficient teaching and learning processes is one of the priorities of any teacher, especially Physical Education teachers, as the delivery of instruction to students evolves. With these, this study proves and illuminates the usefulness of Google sites in delivering physical education teaching. Objectives: This research aims to determine the effects of Google sites as a medium for delivering Physical Education on the learning outcomes of Grade 10 students in one of the secondary schools in the Philippines. Its specific aims were to: (1) determine the impact of Google sites on availability, functionality, and goals, and (2) establish an enhancement program based on the study's findings. Methods: The study utilized a quantitative research design with descriptive approach accompany with survey questionnaire. The purposive sampling was utilized to 106 students from secondary schools in the Philippines. Results: As the findings of the study geared toward its effectiveness in terms of functionality, availability and learning experience, it shows that most of the lessons delivered and maximizing Google sites as a tool in delivering instruction were appreciated by the students where students were mostly “Strongly Agree” with the responses. With this tool in delivering instruction, it shows light that students can easily understand the lesson in learning and doing tasks using Google sites. Conclusion: This study sheds light on the effective and efficient use of Google sites in delivering instruction in PE classes particularly offers a safe learning virtual environment, accessibility to the learning materials and learned using their own time and autonomy in learning. Using Google Sites to the fullest extent possible in Physical Education classes.
Chapter
The pandemic, as a super-problem, caused the greatest educational challenge of the last decades. The educational response of different countries was unplanned and led to what has been called emergency online learning. This chapter describes the effects of this educational response on the different agents involved teachers, students, and educational organizations. Finally, the analysis focuses on Spain, where the conclusions are the lack of planning, the lack of teacher training, and the lack of infrastructure and technology both in the education system and at home. At the same time, it has been an opportunity to test the potential of technology, the generation of educational innovation, and different alternative ways to solve problems such as teacher training.
Thesis
Full-text available
Teachers across a wide range of educational, geographic and practice contexts are being confronted with technologies that have the potential to both disrupt and transform their classrooms, relationship to students, and their own understandings of themselves as professionals. As educational technologies become more integrated into the teaching and learning of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) at universities, developing better understandings of why and in what ways teachers implement and use them can support this integration in constructive ways for both teachers and learners. This thesis explores the idea that interrogating teachers’ ideas about who they are, their identities, may shed light on how they perceive, engage with, and choose whether and to what extent to adopt technologies in the context of their educational practice. This approach may also be useful in supporting EAP teachers’ learning and integration of technology in ways that enhance their practice and relationships to students. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), this study explores the experiences of university EAP teachers using Moodle in their teaching practice. It seeks to develop a clearer understanding of the identities they construct within the context of the language centre of a large European research university. This research also explores the construct of identity as a means of understanding educational technology adoption and use, an approach that has not been widely explored to date, as well as the usefulness of IPA as a methodology suitable for interrogating such experiences within the field of Education. Over the course of a single semester, six EAP teachers took part in focus groups and individual interviews and provided written narratives through which they shared their experiences and individual journeys, their aspirations, frustrations, and changes in their teaching practices. Using IPA data analysis, these narratives together were used to create idiographic sketches of each participant and to develop a detailed analysis of both convergence and divergence of themes across the participants. The study found that participants’ experience of educational technology is always viewed in light of their teaching practices and their relationships to students. It also suggests that professional precarity and beliefs in unsubstantiated myths such as the “digital native” may constitute barriers to teachers’ educational technology integration. These findings support a useful role for identity, conceived as a holistic model incorporating various aspects of a teacher’s being and doing, in not only understanding but also supporting these technology-related practices. The results generate recommendations for practice, including first and foremost that professional learning and support for technology integration begin with teachers, their ideas about themselves, and their concrete practices rather than the technologies themselves. Keywords: Educational Technology, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), Higher Education Teaching, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), Language Teacher Identity, Teacher Identity, Technology Integration
Chapter
Over the past 10 years, the BioGraph project has engaged in systematic design and development research investigating the following overarching research question, “How and in what ways can complex systems resources be integrated into the high school biology curriculum?” In this chapter, I first detail our approach to student learning and teacher professional development (PD), for example using agent-based modeling and building teacher’s social capital. I then describe the design of our curriculum and instruction framework that underpins both the student-facing and teacher PD activities, such as argumentation prompts for debating empirical evidence gathered from simulations. Finally, I discuss research findings, compiled from several empirical studies working with hundreds of high school students in approximately 30 classrooms, which support the design choices, modifications in the design, and lessons learned toward the goals of achieving high-quality learning and instruction of complex systems resources.
Article
Full-text available
This study reports an empirical investigation of the effects of school teachers' self-efficacy and self-concept on their perceived ICT usability. It employed a descriptive survey method within an ex-post-facto research design taking 300 teachers as samples from 50 Indian schools. The findings revealed that self-efficacy and self-concept discretely had a positive effect on teachers' perceived ICT usability although self-concept was found to have a deeper impact in comparison to self-efficacy. But the two variables operated simultaneously had a more significant and stronger positive effect on the teachers' perceived ICT usability. For every 1 standard unit increase in self-efficacy and in self-concept, the perceived ICT usability will be increased by 0.95 standard units. Based on this regression output, the authors proposed the TAM3+ as an extension of the TAM3 by adding a new domain as users' 'subjective self' encompassing self-efficacy and self-concept significantly affecting their perceived ease of technology use.
Chapter
While the shift to emergency remote teaching was sudden and caught many off-guard, the reality exists that we need to better prepare faculty to utilize technology in a meaningful way and integrate it into lessons. This chapter provides an overview of two aspects: 1) preparing faculty for use of technology through a modified transitional learning model so that they are supported with just-in-time professional learning and 2) introducing them to the PICRAT technology framework to assist them in the design of their lessons. Both the model and the framework are constructivist in nature and align with transformative learning theory. Examples of what each of these structures look like are provided within the narrative.
Article
In-service teachers’ professional development regarding technology adoption in education is often focused on only one specific technology. To maximize the utilization of technologies, teachers need to be able to leverage different technologies seamlessly. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) is one of the most important frameworks depicting teachers’ competences for effectively teaching with technology. The TPACK Support-Stimulate-Seek model (3S-TPACK) was used to design training programs with learning activities using robots, IoT-based sensors, actuators, tablets, and computer programming tools. The results show that the training programs designed by adapting the 3S-TPACK model not only can improve the teachers’ learning outcomes but also can support positive attitudes toward adopting robots and IoT technologies in the teaching and learning process.
Chapter
With the sudden shift to emergency remote teaching at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, some educators were more prepared than others having previously utilized digital tools and practices in their classroom. These educators may be considered early adopters, who research has shown tend to be more prevalent among science educators due to the fact that the science and engineering practices often incorporate digital tools as part of the sense-making process. Understanding the crossover between the science and engineering practices, sense-making, and use of digital tools, the author puts forth key lessons learned that should not be abandoned with the return to the classroom but rather transferred to and utilized within a blended learning environment which should become standard for science education.
Article
This study aimed to determine family communication based on satisfaction with the uses of new media technology by millennial mothers and teachers in children studying from home during the Covid-19 pandemic. This research was conducted qualitatively through online interviews at the beginning of school from home during pandemic Covid-19. It was conducted from May until June 2020 with 30 millennial mothers born in the 1980s to 1999 in Indonesia. Millennial mothers experienced positive feelings (confidence, satisfaction, happiness) and negative feelings (burden, shock, frustration, stress, and depression). The child experienced positive feelings (happiness, satisfaction, enjoyment) and negative feelings (missing school, tiredness, stress, and sadness). The study results show that negative feelings are determined by negative thoughts caused by mothers’ communication when accompanying their children studying online. Therefore, mothers need to improve how they communicate with their children in school and at home to deal with negative emotions.
Article
Full-text available
Information and communication technology (ICT), an effective teaching tool for 21st-century classrooms, needs few factors for its effectual use as evidenced in the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model. The purpose of this empirical investigation was to investigate the effect of two such significant factors teachers' self-efficacy and perceived infrastructure, on their ease of ICT use. The study employed a descriptive survey method within an ex-post-facto research design taking 400 teachers as samples from 100 purposively selected Indian secondary schools. Data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Regression analyses were conducted to find out the effects of two independent variables on the dependent variable. Results revealed that perception of self-efficacy and infrastructure were significant predictors of the teachers' ease of ICT use. The two independent variables were found to have a high collective prediction on the teachers' ICT use behavior and for every 1 standard unit simultaneous increase self-efficacy and perceived infrastructure, the ease of ICT use will increase by 0.94 standard unit. Perceived infrastructure was found to have a stronger individual effect on the ease of use than self-efficacy. The findings support the UTAUT model and advocate its further extension towards UTAUT+ adding these two new factors to the existing model.
Article
Teachers are faced with fast-paced changes in educational practice and expectations as technology innovation continues over time. This rate of change may contribute to an increase in anxiety that impacts effective technology integration in the classroom. The authors examined peer-reviewed literature from 2008 to 2018 on teacher anxiety from technological change to gain a deeper understanding of the current status and direction of this topic from academic research communities. An in-depth analysis was conducted of 45 articles that focused on these variables in K–12 and higher education teacher populations. Articles were coded for logistical and thematic differences. Four themes emerged: (a) teacher conceptual change; (b) anxiety’s connection with other variables found to influence technology adoption; (c) emotion’s place within existing theoretical models; and (d) emotion’s influence on teacher adaptability.
Article
Full-text available
A study developed and validated new scales for perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which were hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user acceptance. The definitions of the 2 variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity. The items were then tested for reliability and construct validity in 2 studies involving a total of 152 users and 4 application programs. After refining and streamlining the measures, the resulting 2 scales of 6 items each demonstrated reliabilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales also exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. In both studies, usefulness had a greater correlation with usage behavior than did ease of use, though both were significantly correlated with current usage and future usage. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a casual antecedent to perceived usefulness, as opposed to a direct determinant of system usage.
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This paper examines how secondary teachers of the core subjects of English, Mathematics and Science have begun to integrate information and communication technology (ICT) into mainstream,classroom practice in English schools. It draws on an analysis of 18 focus group interviews with core subject departments. The analysis culminated in a thematic model of professional thinking about how the integrated use of ICT can support subject teaching and learning. Evident commitment,to incorporatingICT was tempered by a cautious, critical approach and the influence of external constraints operating. Teacher accounts emphasised,both the use of ICT to enhance and extend existing classroom practice, and change in terms of emerging forms of activity which complemented,or modified practice. A gradual process of pedagogical evolution was apparent; teachers were developing and trialling new strategies specifically for mediating ICT-supported learning. In particular, these overcame the potentially obstructive role of some forms of ICT by focusing pupils’ attention onto underlying learning objectives.
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effects of teachers’ individual characteristics and perceptions of environmental factors that influence their technology integration in the classroom. A research-based path model was developed to explain causal relationships between these factors and was tested based on data gathered from 1,382 Tennessee public school teachers. The results provided significant evidence that the developed model is useful in explaining factors affecting technology integration and the relationships between the factors. KeywordsTechnology integration-Computer use-Technology use-Computer use in education-Path model
Article
Full-text available
Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research develops and validates new scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user acceptance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application programs. The measures were refined and streamlined, resulting in two six-item scales with reliabilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived usefulness was significantly correlated with both self-reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r =.85, Study 2). Perceived ease of use was also significantly correlated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correlation with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antecedent to perceived usefulness, as opposed to a parallel, direct determinant of system usage. Implications are drawn for future research on user acceptance.
Article
This study determined whether Louisiana family and consumer sciences teachers integrate technology in instruction. Over half use college courses as a technology training source while most are self-taught or utilize workshops/conferences and colleagues. Teachers have adopted technology for use in instruction at a moderate level and experience moderate barriers and some anxiety as they attempt to incorporate technology. Age, technology anxiety, availability, and integration barriers are individually related to technology adoption. Regression analysis was used to assess the variance explained by the variables that are individually related to technology adoption. Technology anxiety explains a large proportion of the variance in technology adoption. Age, barriers to technology integration, and technology availability do not explain significant variance beyond the variance explained by technology anxiety. Advances in technology have afforded students a new way of experiencing learning. To tap into the benefits that technology provides, teachers need to utilize technology to enhance instruction by applying course content to realistic career and life challenges. This is especially important in career and technical education programs, such as family and consumer sciences education (FACS). In fact, the importance of the use of technology in instruction was stated in Standard 6 of the 2004 National Standards for Teachers of Family and Consumer Sciences: 6. Instructional Strategies and Resources. Facilitate students' critical thinking and problem solving in family and consumer sciences through varied instructional strategies and technologies and through responsible management of resources in schools, communities, and the workplace (National Association of Teacher Educators for Family and Consumer Sciences, 2004, paragraph 4). Even before approval of the 2004 FACS standards, Keane (2002) reported that "Some states had decided to take the national standards for FCS one step further and specifically tailor them to their needs in the areas of technology" (p. 42). Keane further supported the need to integrate technology in FACS when she stated, "As technology use continues to rise, it is essential that FCS professionals grasp the latest concepts for use in their classrooms" (p. 43). Arnett and Freeburg (2008) studied the early field experiences of FACS pre-service teachers and found that the skill area that the pre-service teachers felt they needed to develop was the knowledge and use of technology in the classroom. Reichelt and Pickard (2008) discussed how technology such as the Internet could be used in FACS classrooms. In discussing Internet learning activities for FACS, they stated, "Perhaps the simplest and most straight forward way of integrating technology into family and consumer sciences classrooms is the potential of the Internet as a source of information. . . . This is one place where the evaluation of information and critical thinking skills can be taught" (p. 52).
Article
This study examined various teacher dispositions that predict technology use among K–12 teachers. The Teacher Attribute Survey was administered to 177 K–12 teachers from six Northwest Ohio schools. This instrument measured a variety of teacher attributes, such as teacher self-efficacy, philosophy, openness to change, amount of professional development, and amount of technology use in the classroom. A forward multiple regression was conducted to identify the best combination of variables that predicts classroom technology use among K–12 teachers. Results indicate that the factor combination of amount of technology training, time spent beyond contractual work week, and openness to change best predicted classroom technology use.
This article reports on the literature associated with practising teachers' uptake of information and communications technology (ICT). Studies reveal a number of factors which influence teachers' decisions to use ICT in the classroom: access to resources, quality of software and hardware, ease of use, incentives to change, support and collegiality in their school, school and national polices, commitment to professional learning and background in formal computer training. The review highlights the role of pedagogy and suggests that teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning with ICT are central to integration. It is suggested that successful implementation of ICT needs to address three interlocking frameworks for change: the teacher, the school and policy makers.
Article
As the technology infrastructure of schools expands, a common concern has been the underutilization of computers and other technologies in the classroom. Teachers are often blamed for failing to integrate technology into their teaching, giving such reasons as lack of time, training, equipment, and support. However, it has been suggested that these are not the “real” reasons technology is underutilized; instead, it is argued that teachers’ core values about teaching and learning are the primary obstacles to successful technology integration (e.g., Cuban, 20018. Cuban , L. 2001 . Oversold and underused: Computers in the classroom , Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press . View all references). Implications for professional development are addressed in relation to these barriers to classroom technology use and the developmental pattern of teachers’ technology integration.
Article
This article presents an experimental study of the inclusion of technology in a higher education teaching context that aims at transforming the educational process by making it both more effective and more attractive to students. Portable Pocket PC devices are used to set up and run collaborative work activities in the classroom under the technologically assisted supervision of the professor. The results lead to various findings regarding the technology inclusion process, such as the importance of the underlying educational model and the instruments that provide the technology, and allow us to draw certain conclusions relating to the educational process, in particular that the continued use of ICTs leads to improvements in student performance. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Comput Appl Eng Educ 17: 100–107, 2009; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com); DOI 10.1002/cae20188
Article
The impact of information and communication technology (ICT) in primary and secondary education is still an open question. Following review of the available literature, we classify the causes of the lack of impact on students' attainment in four dimensions: (1) the design and implementation of ICT in educational settings; (2) the evaluation of its impact; (3) the scaling up of these kinds of innovations; and (4) the cost-effectiveness of technology-enhanced learning environments. Based on this evidence, we proposed the evolutionary development model (EDM), which aims to produce a cost-effective and sustainable ICT for education (ICT4E) programme in three steps: efficacy, effectiveness, and efficiency. In each step, one component of the programme is built and validated in real educational settings. Therefore, the resultant ICT4E programme is ready to be replicated across the school system. We also show how the EDM guided the development of a programme based on mobile computer supported collaborative learning, known as Eduinnova. Finally, we discuss how EDM can serve as an analysis tool for researchers and policy makers.
Article
Abstract There is growing interest in the integration of technology into the classroom. A range of initiatives have been launched to develop in-service teacher training processes that will strengthen this integration. In the present paper, we systematize the findings of a large selection of studies on this topic, focusing on domains and competencies linked to teacher training propositions for technology integration. Our main result is the presentation of six such domains that have been proposed in the existing literature: instrumental/technological, pedagogical/curricular, didactic/methodological, evaluative/investigative, communicational/relational and personal/attitudinal. A set of teaching competencies for each domain is also identified. These domains and competencies together form the bases for creating a technology integration training model.
Chapter
Remarks made in the preceding chapters in this section, in addition to some personal observations, are converged towards a conclusion about the success or failure of the policies developed, and to suggest a path toward the future. In general, the higher the economic level in a region the more that an explicit policy focus on IT and education is fading. Using IT in education is becoming more implicit and incorporated in a broader policy context, especially around needed qualifications and competencies of citizens in a knowledge society. There is a lack of convincing evaluation and assessment results that show the impact of the policies. Perhaps it will only be when both informal and formal learning are considered that the potential of IT for the transformation of learning will be achieved.
Article
In this study, an instructional design model was employed for restructuring a teacher education course with technology. The model was applied in a science education method course, which was offered in two different but consecutive semesters with a total enrollment of 111 students in the fall semester and 116 students in the spring semester. Using tools, such as multimedia authoring tools in the fall semester and modeling software in the spring semester, teacher educators designed high quality technology-infused lessons for science and, thereafter, modeled them in classroom for preservice teachers. An assessment instrument was constructed to assess preservice teachers’ technology competency, which was measured in terms of four aspects, namely, (a) selection of appropriate science topics to be taught with technology, (b) use of appropriate technology-supported representations and transformations for science content, (c) use of technology to support teaching strategies, and (d) integration of computer activities with appropriate inquiry-based pedagogy in the science classroom. The results of a MANOVA showed that preservice teachers in the Modeling group outperformed preservice teachers’ overall performance in the Multimedia group, F = 21.534, p = 0.000. More specifically, the Modeling group outperformed the Multimedia group on only two of the four aspects of technology competency, namely, use of technology to support teaching strategies and integration of computer activities with appropriate pedagogy in the classroom, F = 59.893, p = 0.000, and F = 10.943, p = 0.001 respectively. The results indicate that the task of preparing preservice teachers to become technology competent is difficult and requires many efforts for providing them with ample of opportunities during their education to develop the competencies needed to be able to teach with technology.
Article
The article focuses on issues concerning the value of new technologies rather than the research issues to improve research in order to learn more about the value of new technologies. During the 1980s, a great deal of emphasis was placed on software productivity improvements. New technologies were explored and advocated that were claimed to give "orders of magnitude" improvements. During the 1990s, the emphasis has swung to software quality. Again, new technologies have been explored and advocated to give similar improvements. The purpose of this article is to investigate that question by identifying several specific productivity and quality improvements and exploring via the research literature what findings and data exist to support their value. To explore the value of new technologies people should look at the literature investigating several of those claimed to have significant benefits, those are, Structured Techniques, Fourth Generation Languages, Computer Aided Software Engineering, Formal Methods, Cleanroom Methodology, Process Models and Object-Orientation.
The ICT impact report: A review of studies of ICT impact on schools in Europe. European Schoolnet The computer enters the classroom
  • A Balanskat
  • R Blamire
  • S Kefala
Balanskat, A., Blamire, R., & Kefala, S. (2006). The ICT impact report: A review of studies of ICT impact on schools in Europe. European Schoolnet. December 12, 2011, from <http://insight.eun.org/shared/data/pdf/impact_study.pdf>. Budin, H. (1999). The computer enters the classroom. Teachers College Record, 100, 656–669.
Measuring ICT use in education in Asia and the Pacific through performance indicatorsEurostat statistical workshop on monitoring the information society: Data, Measurement and Methods Faculty adoption of educational technology
  • C Villanueva
  • Unece Joint
  • Unctad
  • Unesco
  • Itu
  • Oecd
Villanueva C. (2003). Measuring ICT use in education in Asia and the Pacific through performance indicators. Joint UNECE/UNCTAD/UNESCO/ITU/ OECD/Eurostat statistical workshop on monitoring the information society: Data, Measurement and Methods. March 07, 2012, from <http://www.unece.org/stats/documents/ ces/sem.52/6.e.pdf>. Zellweger, F. (2007). Faculty adoption of educational technology. Educase Quarterly, 1, 66–69.
Introduction to survey sampling, series: Quantitative applications in the social sciences
  • G Kalton
Kalton, G. (1983). Introduction to survey sampling, series: Quantitative applications in the social sciences. SAGE University.
Policy from a global perspective International handbook of information technology in primary and secondary education
  • J Moonen
Moonen, J., 2008. Policy from a global perspective, In J. Voogt, G. Knezek (Eds.), International handbook of information technology in primary and secondary education, pp. 1171–1178.
Mastering the hype cycle: How to choose the right innovation at the right time (Gartner)
  • F Fenn
  • M Raskino
Fenn, F., & Raskino, M. (2008). Mastering the hype cycle: How to choose the right innovation at the right time (Gartner). Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
The ICT impact report: A review of studies of ICT impact on schools in Europe. European Schoolnet
  • Balanskat