Article

Congenital miliaria crystallina – A diagnostic dilemma

Authors:
  • IES,IPS ACEDEMY, INDORE
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Abstract

Miliaria crystallina is a transient, superficial obstruction of eccrine sweat ducts resulting in rapidly evolving noninflammatory vesicles. The disease is observed frequently in hot, humid, tropical climates and in the neonatal period, most likely due to lack of maturation of the sweat duct during the first few days following birth. It is rarely present at delivery and remains a diagnostic dilemma for the neonatologists. We report a rare case of “Congenital miliaria crystallina” that was present at birth.

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... e addition of specific ingredients can render it antiparasitic, antifungal, and keratolytic effects [ Table 2]. [5,12] e following are dermatoses in which calamine lotion is found useful: 1. Acute or subacute, less edematous, and less inflamed dermatoses or eczema [ Table 2]. 2. Dermatitis or eczema complicated by fungi (calamine lotion containing resorcinol). ...
... 8. Miliaria, urticaria, insect bites, and stings (calamine lotion provides antipruritic and soothing effects). [12] 9. Acne vulgaris and other acneiform dermatoses [ Table 2]. 10. ...
... Physical sunscreen (calamine lotion can act as a sunscreen since it contains zinc oxide). [12] ...
Article
Full-text available
Calamine lotion is a shake lotion composed of calamine (zinc oxide/carbonate and ferric oxide), zinc oxide, bentonite, glycerine, sodium citrate, and liquified phenol. It is used widely in dermatology as a soothing agent. It is a preferred topical therapeutic agent for children including infants and is considered safe in pregnancy and lactation.
... Clinical appearance of MC has translucent vesicle 1-2 mm in diameter, with an appearance of "drops of water", without an inflammatory halo [6]. Diseases of vesicular and pustular disorders such as herpes simplex, varicella, erythema toxicum neonatorum (ETN), neonatal pustular melanosis, infantile acropustulosis, and staphylococcal infectious are important for the differential diagnosis of MC [7][8][9]. Erythema toxicum neonatorum presents with multiple erythematous macules and papules that rapidly progress to pustules on an erythematous base, and the rash usually resolves in five to seven days. Histopatholgical findings of this disease are of numerous eosinophils and occasional neutrophils. ...
... The most important differences include that, in MC, the sweat in the blisters is not colored, but clear like water, therefore; the color and the form of the lesions allow a definite clinical diagnosed [7]. The presented patient had similar cutaneous lesions of MC, however; she had no history of drug use, fever, environmental heat or humidity. ...
... In addition, TORCH serology and acute phase reactants for infectious are negatively for her, and skin biopsy demonstrates lymphocytes infiltration, therefore; the patient was diagnosed with MC. The only effective treatment and prevention is to avoid further sweating [7]. ...
Chapter
More than 95% of newborns have cutaneous findings, which often are distressing to parents but frequently are benign and self-limited. Among them are milia, cutis marmorata, congenital dermal melanocytosis, and the benign neonatal pustular eruptions (Rayala 2017, Zuniga 2013). The majority of the dermatologic alterations in neonates are physiological, transient and do not require any treatment, thus the parents can be reassured about the good prognosis (Patrizi 2017). An overview of the most common or important dermatoses presenting in neonatal and infant age group are illustrated in this chapter with nearly 90 clinical photographs. Customer can order it via https://www.springer.com/in/book/9789811554827.
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Generalized congenital miliaria crystallina occurred in a black newborn boy. Although miliaria crystalina occurring in infancy and beyond is well established, congenital occurrence is very rare. The pathogenesis of the disorder is not well understood. We discuss some hypotheses of pathogenesis in the context of our patient, as well as a differential diagnosis and a comparison with a previously reported case. Miliaria crystallina should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesiculobullous eruptions in newborns.
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Generalized congenital miliaria crystallina occurred in a black newborn boy. Although miliaria crystallina occurring in infancy and beyond is well established, congenital occurrence is very rare. The pathogenesis of the disorder is not well understood. We discuss some hypotheses of pathogenesis in the context of our patient, as well as a differential diagnosis and a comparison with a previously reported case. Miliaria crystallina should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesiculobullous eruptions in newborns.
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Article
Miliaria crystallina is a transient, superficial obstruction of eccrine sweat ducts resulting in rapidly evolving noninflammatory vesicles. The disease is observed frequently in hot, humid, tropical climates and in the neonatal period, but congenital occurrence is very rare. Miliaria crystallina must be considered in the differential diagnosis of bullous diseases in newborns.
Article
Our objective was to study skin disorders in neonates within the first 48 hours of life in Ahvaz, Iran. One thousand consecutive neonates were examined in a descriptional prospective cohort study for 1 year (2002-03). The rate of skin disorders and their relationship to age of gestation and sex were calculated and analyzed using the computerized program SPSS version 10 and chi-squared test (chi2). Our findings were Mongolian spots (71.3%), Epstein pearls (70.2%), sebaceous hyperplasia (43.7%), salmon patch (26.2%), hypertrichosis (25.7%), erythema toxicum (11.1%), milia (7.5%), desquamation (1.9%), hemangioma (1.3%), and miliaria (1.3%). The most frequent skin disorders were Mongolian spots, Epstein pearls, and sebaceous hyperplasia. Differences between our study findings and those of others may be based on racial differences and study method.