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... Neben dem Wortschatz und den phonologischen Kompetenzen zählt auch die Buchstabenkenntnis (visuelle Informationsverarbeitung) zu den Prädiktoren des Schriftspracherwerbs (Goldammer et al., 2010;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). So zeigen sich für die frühe Buchstabenkenntnis mittelhohe Zusammenhänge mit der späteren Leseleistung (vgl. ...
... Verschiedene nationale und internationale Studien habe mittlerweile den Zusammenhang der HLE mit der sprachlichen und schriftsprachlichen kindlichen Entwicklung belegt (z.B. Hood, Conlon & Andrews, 2008;Melhuish et al., 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013. Die Familie gilt somit als erste und wichtigste Bildungsinstitution, in welcher Kinder erstmals mit Schriftlichkeit in Berührung kommen. ...
... Eltern, die selbst häufigen Lese-und Schreibaktivitäten nachgehen, fördern dabei auch das Interesse ihrer Kinder (Nickel, 2010). Das Lese-und Vorleseverhalten, Bibliotheksbesuche und die Anzahl von Büchern im Haushalt können die spätere Lesefähigkeit von Kindern vorhersagen (Melhuish et al., 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Neben dem Vorlesen spielt auch das Modellverhalten der Eltern eine wesentliche Rolle (Niklas, 2014). ...
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In this study, precursors of mathematical and literacy competences of kindergarten children were assessed. The association of family background, Home Numeracy Environment (HNE), Home Literacy Environment(HLE) and early child competencies was analyzed. The HNE signif-icantly predictedbasic numerical competencies and the HLE significantly predicted children’s linguistic competencies. Further, the HNE was a significant predictor of letter knowledge
... The most commonly reported aspects of the physical environment of the home in the literature are SES and home literacy resources (Aram et al., 2013;Bradley et al., 1989;Burgess et al., 2002;Foster et al., 2005;Hamilton et al., 2016;Huttenlocher et al., 2010;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;White, 1982). ...
... More recent studies report that SES can predict children's early literacy development, but that other home factors mediate the relationship between SES and children's early literacy development (Aram et al., 2013;Bradley et al., 1989;Burgess et al., 2002;Foster et al., 2005;Hamilton, et al., 2016;Huttenlocher, et al. 2010;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). For example, Bradley et al. (1989) found that some other home factors, such as parental responsivity and availability of stimulating play materials had a much stronger predictive relationship than SES with the developmental status of one-to two-year-old children. ...
... However, when other home factors, including literacy resources, and parent-child reading frequency and time were entered into the model, the significant contribution of SES to those early literacy skills completely or partially diminished. Similarly, Niklas and Schneider's (2013) study showed that HLE factors fully mediated the relationships between SES and German-speaking children's vocabulary, phonological awareness, and letter knowledge. Huttenlocher et al. (2010) reported that parents' child-directed speech mediated the relationship between SES and children's speech level at 14 to 46 months of age. ...
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Home literacy environment (HLE) refers to the physical, interpersonal, and emotional / motivational factors in the home that have been found to be important for children’s literacy development. In this paper, the emergence of HLE research, its conceptualizations, and the effects of HLE factors, will be reviewed with an emphasis on the relations between HLE and children’s early literacy skills. Challenges faced by HLE researchers are also considered, and three aspects of issues are identified: privacy sensitivity, measure validity, and intervention fidelity. Apart from what is already known, this paper will also provide a summary of possible goals for future research.
... expressive vocabulary, as well as with language comprehension competencies and their precursors, e.g. receptive vocabulary and phonological awareness (Frijters et al., 2000;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). ...
... When investigating the relations between the HLE and the development of children's competencies, additional child and family characteristics should be considered. In most cases, children growing up in families with a higher socioeconomic status (SES) experience a higher quality literacy environment (Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Moreover, the linguistic abilities of 3-to 5-year-old children vary depending on their parental SES (Weinert & Ebert et al., 2013). ...
... Relations between the HLE and children's development of linguistic abilities are well established (e.g. Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002). However, we know less about potential associations between the HLE and children's socioemotional development in early childhood, especially with regard to potential mediation effects via children's linguistic abilities (e.g. Rose et al., 2018). ...
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Both linguistic and socioemotional competencies develop in early childhood in the context of children's learning environments at home and during interactions with their parents. To support linguistic competencies, the Home Literacy Environment (HLE) and shared reading routines play a crucial role. In turn, research also indicates associations between the HLE and children's socioemotional development. Based on a sample of N = 132 children with an average age of M = 37 months (SD = 4.00) at t1, this longitudinal study aimed at investigating the role of the HLE for the development of children's linguistic and socioemotional competencies in the early years. Children's receptive and expressive linguistic abilities were assessed with standardized tests and educators and parents reported on the HLE and shared reading routines, as well as children's socioemotional competencies and problem behavior three times across 1 year. In a structural equation model, children's HLE was a significant predictor of children's socioemotional competencies and problem behavior via linguistic abilities. Consequently, children's HLE and parental shared reading habits may be a good target for interventions to support young children's socioemotional learning by contributing to their linguistic development.
... The HLE has a significant influence on children ś emotional and intellectual growth, school readiness, and their subsequent academic achievement ( Sammons et al., 2015 ; Shonkoff & Phillips, 20 0 0 ). The fundamental role of the HLE for children's learning is well documented for domains like literacy ( Hartas, 2011 ;Melhuish et al., 2008 ;Niklas & Schneider, 2013 ;Weigel, Martin, & Bennett, 2006 ) and numeracy ( Anders et al., 2012 ;DeFlorio & Beliakoff, 2015 ;Kluczniok, 2017 ;Niklas & Schneider, 2014 ;Zippert & Rittle-Johnson, 2018 ). ...
... Findings on the interplay between particular HLE factors predominantly come from the domains of literacy and numeracy documenting that the support of literacy and numeracy skills at home is linked to structural family characteristics. These characteristics are often measured by parental education, the family's financial resources, or the home language but they also covary with interests and beliefs ( Anders et al., 2012 ;DeFlorio & Beliakoff, 2015 ;Hartas, 2011 ;Kluczniok, 2017 ;Niklas & Schneider, 2013 ). For example, parents of preschool and school children who feel less confident about their mathematical skills tend to offer less support of math-related activities ( Skwarchuk, 2009 ;Vasilyeva et al., 2018 ). ...
... On average, lower SES parents tend to offer fewer language stimulation and verbally enriched interactions ( Fernald, Marchman, & Weisleder, 2013 ;Pan, Rowe, Singer, & Snow, 2005 ). Given that home-based language and literacy activities are closely connected to and provide prerequisites for science activities (e.g., asking questions, describing observations, explaining ideas), reduced language and literacy activities do not only affect language skills ( Niklas & Schneider, 2013 ;Senechal & LeFevre, 2002 ) but also science skills ( Blums, Belsky, Grimm, & Chen, 2016 ). Similar mediating effects of language skills are known from the domain of mathematics ( McClelland et al., 2007 ;Soto-Calvo, Simmons, Willis, & Adams, 2015 ). ...
Article
Parents play a pivotal role in introducing their children to science, but little is known about the nature of an early science-related home learning environment. This study examines different aspects of the home learning environment and their associations with children's science knowledge. Mediation analyses of a sample of 257 five-year-old preschool children and their parents show that (1) parental engagement in science-related learning activities with their children is associated with children's science knowledge, (2) structural family characteristics as well as parental interest in science are associated with the frequency of these activities, and (3) associations of structural family characteristics and parental interest in science with children's knowledge are mediated by science-related activities. The results emphasize the important role of parents in children's early science education.
... The findings of Sénéchal and LeFevre (2002) were replicated by some studies (Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Skwarchuk et al. (2014). In contrast, some scholars confirmed only a part of those findings (Liu et al., 2018), indicating that mixed findings exist in the relation between home literacy activities and children's reading performance (cf. ...
... Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002;Skwarchuk et al., 2014). Generally, home literacy activities are found to be an important predictor for not only early literacy skills but also for reading achievement (Huntsinger et al., 2016;Manolitsis et al., 2013;Niklas & Schneider, 2013, 2017a. Yeo et al. (2014) found that parents who provide frequent reading activities generally had children who performed higher in reading than their peers. ...
... SES, indicated by parents' educational levels and income, is frequently examined as a factor that impacts the HLE (Chung, 2015;del Río et al., 2017;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). SES is known as a predictor of children's early math and reading skills (Hartas, 2011;Anders et al., 2012), and the HLE is considered to play a mediating role between SES and children's cognitive skills in math and reading (del Río et al., 2017;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Mutaf Yıldız et al., 2018). ...
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The home learning environment (HLE) has been considered to contribute to children’s early math and reading development. Previous studies examined the HLE by examining the influence of parent-child math and reading activities on math and reading outcomes, however also parents’ own perceptions of math and reading and their math anxiety (MA) and reading anxiety (RA) contribute to the HLE but the latter factors have been scarcely explored. The aim of this study was to provide a more holistic view of the HLE and its relations with children’s cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes in math and reading at the start of primary school. This paper examined the relations within the HLE, and the relations between the HLE and children’s early math and reading outcomes. Participants were 301 first-grade children and their parents. The HLE was measured by the parent questionnaire. Children’s digit comparison, number line estimation, letter knowledge and phonological awareness skills were measured as well as their math and reading anxiety levels. The results demonstrated a significant association between parents’ perceptions and their anxiety towards math and reading. No significant associations were found between parents’ perceptions towards math and the frequency of home numeracy activities, whereas significant relations were found in the domain of reading. Socioeconomic status was found to provide a unique contribution in children’s digit comparison and math anxiety, while no significant relations were observed between other HLE factors and children’s outcomes. The current study suggests the importance of including parents’ perceptions and feelings to explore the dynamics of the HLE and its impact on children’s math and reading outcomes.
... There is an interconnection between successful academic development, reading and writing skills and their early development, which are based on phonological awareness, letter knowledge, vocabulary and cognitive abilities as well as on the home literacy environment (HLE), home literacy practices and strategies, the socioeconomic status (SES) of the family and their migration background (Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Children can acquire initial linguistic competencies even before they go to school if their parents provide adequate sufficient help and support. ...
... Analysis should take both into consideration. Researchers regard the first as more effective in the development of early reading (Burgess et al., 2002;Niklas & Schneider, 2013), receptive and expressive vocabulary and later advanced reading performance (Sylva et al., 2004). Research findings have suggested that the precursors of literacy skills development are phonological awareness (Schatschneider et al., 2004), rich vocabulary (Torgesen, 2002), phonological working memory (Archibald & Joanisse, 2009) and early letter knowledge (Torppa et al., 2006). ...
... The home literacy environment is vital for young children's emergent literacy development (Burgess et al., 2002;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). The focus of the home literacy model (HLM; Sénéchal, 2006;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002 is primarily on the printed materials and parent-child interactions (Krijnen et al., 2020) rather than on a large variety of other activities and types of parentchild interactions that facilitate children's literacy development. ...
Article
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The home literacy environment (HLE) involves various oral and written interactions amongst children and parents in a family (Aram & Levin, 2002; Leseman & de Jong, 1998). HLE affects reading and writing development via formal and informal literacy activities (Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002). Through direct and indirect conditions, HLE may provide opportunities and experiences to children (Burgess, 2011; Burgess et al., 2002). This study examined the HLE of Russian-speaking families in Cyprus and its effects on heritage language (HL) use, maintenance and transmission as well as language and literacy development in minority and majority languages. Eighty families residing in Cyprus participated in the study: 40 mixed-marriage and 40 Russian-speaking immigrant families, and data was collected through mixed methods. In other words, data collection instruments included written questionnaires, oral semi-structured interviews and observation, which focused on parental demographics, education, literacy habits and activities, writing and reading beliefs regarding minority and majority languages (Burgess et al., 2002). Results indicated that Russianspeaking parents in this immigrant context realise the importance of (early) child literacy experiences at home and try to enhance these experiences, both in Russian and the majority language(s), via (in)direct teaching and code/meaning-focused shared activities. Different factors affecting the HLE of Russian-speaking immigrants in Cyprus include family type, socio economic status (SES) level of parents’ education, personal trajectories and experience, linguistic and cultural identities, plans for residency, and their children’s education and career. Keywords: home literacy environment, home literacy practices and strategies, early child literacy.
... With the aims of fostering and capturing children's school readiness, many research studies have focused on the support of children's early mathematical and linguistic abilities in the HLE (e.g., Niklas & Schneider, 2017b). A multifaceted HlitE has been shown to support children's early linguistic and literacy competencies in many areas (e.g., Burgess et al., 2002;de Jong & Leseman, 2001;Foy & Mann, 2003;Lehrl, 2018;Melhuish et al., 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Here, parents' formal practices and teaching have been shown to predict children's word reading and written language skills, whereas informal practices, such as shared reading routines, have predicted children's phonological awareness and vocabulary (Farrant & Zubrick, 2012;Sénéchal et al., 1998;Skwarchuk et al., 2014;Trivette et al., 2010). ...
... Moreover, indirect numeracy-related activities, such as playing dice games or counting ingredients while cooking, are related to children's mathematical proficiency (LeFevre et al., 2009). The interplay between parents' background characteristics and children's learning may also be different for the two HLE dimensions: Whereas SES disparities in children's linguistic development have been attributed to a favorable HLE that is influenced by parental beliefs about reading (e.g., Niklas & Schneider, 2013;, the association between a family's SES and children's mathematical abilities has yet to be clarified: According to Elliott and Bachman (2018b), observed SES disparities in children's math achievements may be due to a favorable HLE, but also due to parents' academic socialization and concerted cultivation. Therefore, the authors propose several pathways explaining SES disparities in children's mathematical abilities, including parents' characteristics such as math cognitions (including attitudes, beliefs, and expectations about and for math), practices to support math (formal and informal activities), and parents' language about math concepts. ...
... Another explanation could be that the environment compared to innate child characteristics may play a different role for literacy and mathematical competencies. Research clearly indicates the very important role the environment plays for children's linguistic and literacy development (e.g., Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002). However, whereas the environment (and thus the HnumE) certainly plays an important role for mathematical competencies, this role may be somewhat less important compared to literacy competencies. ...
Article
The Home Learning Environment (HLE) focuses on everyday learning habits in families to support the development of children’s early cognitive competencies. A growing number of studies have assessed the HLE by using different conceptual approaches and various assessment methods, often focusing on either the home literacy environment or the home numeracy environment. However, it is still unclear whether the 2 dimensions of the HLE are separable constructs and which assessment method is best suited for assessing the HLE, making it difficult to interpret and compare different study results. In the current study, we used multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) analyses to compare 3 common methods for assessing the HLE and their relations to various outcomes of kindergarten children. Our sample consisted of 2 independent cohorts of children (N₁ = 190, N₂ = 310) with an average age of 61 months (SD = 4.6). In both cohorts, the MTMM matrix showed a substantial effect of common methods and indicated a 1-dimensional HLE construct indicated most strongly by the children’s book title recognition test (TRT-VS). Even when controlling for child and family characteristics (i.e., intelligence and socioeconomic status), the HLE was statistically significantly related to both the mathematical competencies and the linguistic competencies of the child in a structural equation model. This pattern of results was found consistently across both cohorts. We discuss the significance of a 1-dimensional HLE construct and its different assessment methods in the light of implications for future research and interventional approaches.
... One of the goals of accountability policies is to raise children's reading achievement (Kontovourki, 2009). Decades of research indicate that family SES (Aikens & Barbarin, 2008;Benson & Borman, 2010) and the home literacy environment (Niklas & Schneider, 2013) impact young children's reading achievement. Additionally, consistent research evidence shows that the quantity and quality of reading instruction at school predict children's reading growth (Cheadle, 2008). ...
... Third, this study did not control essential variables such as classroom composition (e.g., Niklas & Tayler, 2018;Weiland & Yoshikawa, 2014) and the home learning environment (Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002). Home literacy environment is a critical determinant that predicts children's reading growth (Aikens & Barbarin, 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). ...
... Third, this study did not control essential variables such as classroom composition (e.g., Niklas & Tayler, 2018;Weiland & Yoshikawa, 2014) and the home learning environment (Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002). Home literacy environment is a critical determinant that predicts children's reading growth (Aikens & Barbarin, 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Future studies should investigate how kindergarten assessment policies impact parents' involvement at school and home during early childhood. ...
Article
Guided by the consequential test validity theory and data use theory (i.e., theory for making a data-driven educational decision), the present study examined the association between the frequency of kindergarten standardized assessments and children’s reading growth from the beginning of kindergarten to the end of first grade. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Kindergarten Cohort of 2010–2011, the final sample included 29,568 observations from 7392 children nested in 744 U.S. kindergartens. The findings from multilevel growth modeling indicated that while children on average did not show a faster reading growth rate from taking frequent standardized assessments in kindergarten, the magnitude of the impact varied across subgroups of children. Specifically, Asian children and children of high socioeconomic status (SES) showed a slightly more significant reading growth than that of their peers when they attended kindergartens with frequent standardized assessments. In contrast, Hispanic, Black, other races/ethnicities, low SES, children with disabilities, and English language learners did not show significant reading growth, even when they took standardized assessments more frequently in kindergarten. The study concludes with a discussion of the implication of kindergarten standardized assessment policies regarding the consequential test validity and data use theory.
... Early reading and spelling skills become relatively stable at the beginning of primary school and continue to improve thereafter (Lerkkanen et al., 2004a;Entwisle et al., 2005;Duncan et al., 2007;Torppa et al., 2017). Although schools are responsible for the development of children's reading and spelling skills, parents and the home learning environments they create may be equally important in their development (Sénéchal andLeFevre, 2002, 2014;Manolitsis et al., 2013;Niklas and Schneider, 2013;Silinskas et al., 2020a,b). Although a plethora of studies on the effect of parental teaching on children's skills exists, there are some limitations in the previous research that should be noted. ...
... In particular, the teaching of reading before primary school has been found to be related to children's early literacy skills, such as print concept awareness, letter knowledge, and decoding abilities (Sénéchal and LeFevre, 2002;Torppa et al., 2006). These associations have been demonstrated in opaque languages, such as English (Sénéchal and LeFevre, 2002;Hood et al., 2008;Stephenson et al., 2008) and French (Sénéchal, 2006), and similar results have been obtained in orthographically transparent languages, such as German Schneider, 2013, Niklas andSchneider, 2017), Greek (Manolitsis et al., 2011(Manolitsis et al., , 2013, and Finnish (Silinskas et al., 2020a,b). ...
... Although not explicitly examined as part of the Home Literacy Model (Sénéchal andLeFevre, 2002, 2014), spelling activities in kindergarten (or, to be precise, a combination of teaching reading and spelling) were shown to be related to the development of children's spelling skills in kindergarten (Levy et al., 2006) and in Grades 1 and 4 (Sénéchal, 2006). Similar relationships were found in both opaque languages, such as English (Levy et al., 2006;Sénéchal, 2006), and transparent languages, such as German (Niklas and Schneider, 2013). In addition, a few observational studies on the quality of parental interaction during writing/word-printing tasks found a positive association with children's word writing in kindergarten (Aram and Levin, 2002) and Grade 1 (Aram et al., 2013). ...
Article
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We investigated the longitudinal links between parental teaching of reading and spelling and children's word reading and spelling skills. Data of 244 Lithuanian parent-child dyads were analyzed, who were followed across three time points: end of kindergarten (T1; M age = 6.88; 116 girls), beginning of Grade 1 (T2), and end of Grade 1 (T3). The children's word reading and spelling skills were tested, and the parents answered questionnaires on the frequency with which they taught their children reading and spelling. Overall, the results showed that the parents were responsive to their children's skill levels across the domains of reading and spelling and across time (i.e., the transition from kindergarten to Grade 1 and across Grade 1). However, differences between the domains of reading and spelling were also observed. In particular, in the domain of reading and across the transition from kindergarten to Grade 1, the parents responded to their children's skill levels by increasing the time spent teaching children with poor word reading skills, and decreasing the teaching time for the children with good word reading skills. In contrast, as spelling skills may require more time to develop, parents maintained similar frequencies of teaching spelling across the transition to Grade 1 for all children, and only parents of good spellers taught less spelling at the end of Grade 1 than parents of children with poor and average word spelling skills.
... There is a large body of research showing that the academically related activities children do at home are associated with their educational development, although much of the research has used samples composed of preschoolers and children at the start of elementary school [1][2][3][4]. ...
... Research on the home learning environment has generally focused on reading, and more recently, mathematics. There has been less focus on science or written language, two other important components of children's schooling [2]. Such research has also mainly focused on young children's home learning activities and not those of children in elementary school. ...
... We have not been able to find a body of research on parents' socialization of their children's written language. In fact, we found only two studies [2,3] and neither considered the factors that we are considering in this paper nor documented engagement in focal activities. ...
Article
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It is well accepted that the home learning environment impacts school performance; however, much of the previous research has focused on preschool children. This exploratory study used an online, Qualtrics survey to ask parents (N = 177) of elementary students about the home learning environment. Our research questions addressed (1) the amount of time children spend on mathematics, reading, written language, and science at home, and differences by subject and/or grade; (2) parental beliefs about the importance of engaging in home learning activities in each of the four subjects; (3) parental confidence in supporting each of the four academic subjects; (4) parental and child enjoyment of the four academic subjects; and (5) who (parents, child, or teacher) initiated home learning activities in the different subject areas. The results indicated that elementary school-age children were engaged in reading, mathematics, science, and written language activities at home; however, the most time was spent on reading activities. Parents reported viewing engagement and assistance with academically related activities at home as important; however, they were more confident assisting with reading and written language than mathematics or science. Strong associations were noted between parental enjoyment of a subject and their confidence in assisting their child. Overall, teachers initiated more activities for older children and were more likely to initiate mathematics activities. When children initiated an activity, it was typically reading related.
... low-SES families-provide children with little literacy support due to limited resources and parental reading abilities (Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Payne et al., 1994) and that this results in low child literacy levels (Hoff, 2006). FLPs might then encourage home support in the form of activities such as shared reading, thereby stimulating children's literacy development. ...
... The frequency of literacy-related parent-child activities such as shared reading and the quality of parent-child interactions during those activities have been found to predict both "comprehension-related" emergent literacy skills, such as vocabulary and story comprehension, and "coderelated skills," such as letter knowledge and phonological awareness (Burgess et al., 2002;Bus et al., 1995;Hammett et al., 2003;Hood et al., 2008;Leseman & De Jong, 1998;Mol & Neuman, 2014;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2014;Sonnenschein & Munsterman, 2002). Studies have also shown that children's home literacy experiences vary with demographic variables such as SES (Bus et al., 2000;Gonzalez et al., 2017;Leseman & De Jong, 1998; van Steensel, 2006) and that the HLE partly mediates the SES effect on emergent literacy (Aikens & Barbarin, 2008;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Together, these observations have given rise to the development of a broad array of FLPs (Wasik, 2012). ...
Article
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The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate effects of family literacy programs on the emergent literacy skills of children from low socioeconomic status families (0–6) and to establish which program, sample, study, and measurement characteristics moderate program effects. Outcomes of 48 (quasi-)experimental studies covering 42 different programs revealed a medium average effect of Cohen’s d = 0.50 on immediate posttests and a marginal average effect of Cohen’s d = 0.16 on follow-up measures. Together, effects of different moderator variables indicate that children benefit from targeted programs that focus on a limited set of activities and skills and that are restricted to one (training) context. Additionally, we found larger effects in experimental studies and when researcher-developed tests were used. Our outcomes not only provide guidelines for program developers but also call for more longitudinal research that examines how positive short-term changes as a consequence of program participation can be sustained over time.
... Demnach scheint es, dass gerade im Vorschulalter die soziale Schichtzugehörigkeit, deren enger Zusammenhang zur Qualität der häuslichen Lernumgebung bereits nachgewiesen ist (z. B. Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Mutaf, 2019), interindividuelle Unterschiede im zahl-und mengenbezogenen Vorwissen zu einem gewissen Teil erklärt. ...
... dem Kindergarten kommt hinsichtlich der vorschulischen Förderung -gerade mit Blick auf Gleichbehandlung und strukturierter Durchführung -eine zentrale Rolle zu, auch wenn die Bedeutung der familiären Lernumwelt sowie deren Berücksichtigung bei der Konzeption neuerer Förderprogramme zunehmend in den Fokus der Forschung rückt (vgl. Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Mutaf, 2019). Die Empfehlung einer frühzeitigen und mehrdimensionalen mathematischen Förderung ist in diesem Kontext naheliegend (Viesel-Nordmeyer et al., 2020). ...
Thesis
Die Entwicklung mathematischer Kompetenzen beginnt bereits vor Schuleintritt und wird durch viele Faktoren beeinflusst. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird primär untersucht, ob die phonologische Bewusstheit als (meta-)sprachliche Kompetenz auch für die frühe mathematische Kompetenzentwicklung bedeutsam ist und ob sich bei Kindern mit und ohne Migrationshintergrund vergleichbare Zusammenhänge finden lassen. Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt bildet die Überprüfung von differenziellen Effekten von ausgewählten, mathematischen Vorschultrainings sowie eines Trainings der phonologischen Bewusstheit auf die mathematischen Kompetenzen unter Berücksichtigung des Migrationshintergrundes. Die statistischen Analysen basieren auf einer Stichprobe von über 370 Kindern, die im Verlauf der Längsschnittstudie zu vier Messzeitpunkten, jeweils am Beginn und Ende des Vorschul- bzw. ersten Schuljahres, untersucht wurden. Durch Berechnung hierarchischer Regressionsanalysen ließ sich global kein zusätzlicher Erklärungsbeitrag der phonologischen Bewusstheit neben den mathematischen Ausgangskompetenzen feststellen. Der Vergleich der beiden Migrationsgruppen ergab keine strukturellen Unterschiede. Die Überprüfung von spezifischen Effekten durch mathematische Vorschulprogramme (Krajewski et al., 2007; Friedrich & de Galgóczy, 2004; Preiß, 2004, 2005) und von unspezifischen Effekten durch ein Training der phonologischen Bewusstheit und der Buchstaben-Laut-Zuordnung (Küspert & Schneider, 2008; Plume & Schneider, 2004) auf die mathematischen Kompetenzen lieferte nur vereinzelt positive Effekte, die jedoch bei Berücksichtigung von individuellen und familiären Kontrollvariablen reduziert wurden. Die Generalisierbarkeit der Ergebnisse ist durch die komplexe Datenstruktur verbunden mit kleinen Stichprobengrößen in den jeweiligen Faktorenstufen limitiert. Insgesamt ermöglicht die vorliegende Arbeit eine differenzierte Betrachtung der mathematischen Kompetenzentwicklung bei Kindern mit und ohne Migrationshintergrund und liefert wichtige Implikationen für Forschung und Praxis.
... Additionally, some studies consider mathematical experiences beyond numeracy e.g., spatial and patterning experiences (Hart et al., 2016;Huntsinger et al., 2016;Zippert & Rittle-Johnson, 2020). Many studies have shown that some measures of the home numeracy environment are related to numerical attainment (Anders et al., 2012;del Río et al., 2017;Hart et al., 2016;Huntsinger et al., 2016;Napoli & Purpura, 2018;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Skwarchuk et al., 2014;Sonnenschein et al., 2016), although others have failed to identify any significant relationships (Blevins-Knabe et al., 2000;Lehrl et al., 2019;Missall et al., 2015). These differences are most likely underpinned by how the home numeracy environment is conceptualised and assessed. ...
... 1. Does the frequency of home number and home literacy experiences independently predict later counting, number transcoding and calculation skills? In view of research reporting positive links between formal or direct home number experiences and symbolic aspects of mathematics (Anders et al., 2012;del Río et al., 2017;Hart et al., 2016;Huntsinger et al., 2016;Napoli & Purpura, 2018;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Skwarchuk et al., 2014;Sonnenschein et al., 2016), we hypothesised that the frequency of home number experiences would explain unique variance in children's counting, number transcoding and calculation skills. Given previous findings of stronger relationships between code-, rather than meaning-focused, home literacy experiences and numeracy skills in young children (Manolitsis et al., 2013;Napoli & Purpura, 2018), we hypothesised that the frequency of code-, but not meaning-focused literacy experiences, would explain unique variance in later counting, number transcoding and calculation skills. ...
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This study examines the longitudinal relationships between home learning experiences and early number skills. The counting, number transcoding and calculation skills of 274 children were assessed in the penultimate term of preschool (Mage=4:0). Prior to these assessments, parents completed questionnaires that surveyed the frequency of the children's home learning experiences. Three types of experiences were indexed: code-focused home literacy experiences that focus on the phonological and orthographic features of language, meaning-focused home literacy experiences that focus on sharing the meaning of language and text, and home number experiences. The children's language abilities (phonological awareness and vocabulary) and nonverbal abilities (inhibitory control and nonverbal reasoning) were assessed in the final term of preschool (Mage=4:3). Their number skills were reassessed in the final term of the first year of primary school (Mage=5:3). Home letter-sound interaction experiences (interactive code-focused literacy experiences) had significant longitudinal relationships with counting and number transcoding that were independent of language and nonverbal abilities. The relationship between letter-sound interaction experiences and later counting was also independent of the autoregressive influence of baseline counting ability. We extend previous findings by demonstrating that interactive code-focused home literacy experiences in the preschool period predict growth in counting skills even when a broad range of language and cognitive abilities are controlled.
... informal stimulation (storybook exposure)the first promotes the acquisition of early literacy skills whereas the latter has effect on oral language skills. Investigating different age ranges, Hood et al. (2008), Lehrl et al. (2020), Niklas &Schneider (2013) andSenechal (2006) indeed found partial to total mediation effect of cognitive stimulation on different literacy outcomes through early language and literacy skills. Our results seem consistent with this literature. ...
... informal stimulation (storybook exposure)the first promotes the acquisition of early literacy skills whereas the latter has effect on oral language skills. Investigating different age ranges, Hood et al. (2008), Lehrl et al. (2020), Niklas &Schneider (2013) andSenechal (2006) indeed found partial to total mediation effect of cognitive stimulation on different literacy outcomes through early language and literacy skills. Our results seem consistent with this literature. ...
Thesis
This dissertation aimed at providing a greater understanding of what fosters or hampers the acquisition of academic skills in children. To do so, we have conducted a series of studies using longitudinal data from two French cohorts, the EDEN cohort and the DEPP Panel 2007, assessing the relative influences of a wide variety of factors on diverse aspects of academic achievement in middle school. First, we studied the extent of the association between intelligence and academic skills in France. We assessed the strength of this relationship, as well as the socio-economic and conative influences on academic skills and their progression beyond the role of IQ. We further investigated the relationship between IQ and academic achievement among intellectually gifted student. Second, we digged into one component of academic skills, numeracy, examining its preschool predictors. We assessed the relative predictive power of cognitive, socio-emotional and environmental factors on arithmetic skills as well as their mediation relationships; and investigated the differential cognitive predictors of addition, subtraction and multiplication. Third, we similarly studied the preschool cognitive, socio-emotional and environmental influences on the acquisition of different literacy skills, and their mediating relationships. Fourth and last, we examined sex differences in both literacy and numeracy, assessing the influence of evaluation characteristics on these gaps. The results of these studies provide valuable insights into the mechanisms underlying the acquisition of academic skills in France, and have practical implications for practitioners and actors in the education sphere.
... This linguistic variation not only affects the literacy development for speakers of their respective languages but is impacted by a variety of other sociocultural differences as well. While it is well established that cognitive skills are essential for reading (Cain, Oakhill, and Bryant 2004;Joshi and Aaron 2000), a variety of factors also play a central role in this process, particularly how language is developed in the home and school (Aaron et al. 2008;Guthrie and Klauda 2014;Niklas and Schneider 2013;Sénéchal, Whissell, and Bildfell 2017;van Steensel 2006). The relationship between these settings is well established in the literature (e.g. ...
... How children learn to read has been a central topic of research in applied linguistics, psychology, and education, and through this research, there is a large body of knowledge about literacy development and reading instruction . While cognitive and linguistic skills are essential for reading (Cain, Oakhill, and Bryant 2004;Kamhi and Catts 2012) a variety of psychological and contextual factors also play a central role in this process (Aaron et al. 2008;Niklas and Schneider 2013;van Steensel 2006;Wang and Guthrie 2004). Psychological factors such as gender and age as well as attitudes and self-concept influence how children approach and develop their language and literacy (Joshi et al. 2012). ...
Article
The current study examines the effects of the sociocultural context of primary school reading among Arabic- and English-speaking students in the UAE. Using a sample of 16,391 fourth graders (English: n = 10,507; Arabic: n = 5,884) from the 2016 Process in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS), results revealed that while early language environment and classroom practices play a role for all students, specific factors differ for Arabic- and English-speaking students. Specifically, the results suggest that some early language variables do not impact later reading achievement for Arabic-speaking students. However, certain classroom practices have a positive effect on Arabic reading in primary school. The discussion focuses on possible explanations of these group differences and the importance of tailoring early language experiences and classroom practices to complement specific linguistic and sociocultural contexts.
... The home learning environment (HLE) is one of the contexts within which young children develop important competencies (e.g., Niklas and Schneider, 2013;Lehrl et al., 2020b), and which affects their long-term development (e.g., Niklas and Schneider, 2017;Lehrl et al., 2020a). Primary caregivers may support children's learning during everyday routine interactions and by shared reading or playing games. ...
... The frequency with which children engage in reading activities is an important positive predictor of children's literacy development (Baker et al., 2001;Levy et al., 2006;Niklas & Schneider, 2013). Serpell et al. (2005), in their longitudinal study of U.S. children's literacy development, found that children who started first grade at the 25 th percentile in literacy skills increased to the top quarter of the distribution by the end of third grade if they engaged in some form of daily literacy activity at home. ...
Article
Research Findings: During COVID-19 many countries, including the U.S., implemented stay-at-home policies that closed most schools and childcare centers. This research focuses on the home learning environment reported by parents for U.S. children ages two through nine during the COVID-19 crisis. Parents in the U.S. (N = 162) completed an online survey of multiple choice and short-answer questions about the home literacy and digital environment. All data in this convenience sample were collected during the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis (May 2020). Despite the limited, nonrepresentative sample, these findings provide an initial, mainly descriptive report about the home learning environment during COVID-19. Key findings are related to home literacy and digital activities during COVID-19. Children, regardless of age, engaged in more at-home digital activities during COVID-19 than before. Children in first grade and older increased digital use significantly more than younger ones. There was a significant correlation between frequency of digital usage and home literacy activities. Practice or Policy: Virtual learning opportunities are becoming a reality for even the youngest children in the U.S. This has increased with in-school closures during COVID-19 and may continue as some children return to school. Using digital devices for participating in literacy activities may be an effective means of promoting children’s literacy development.
... Home literacy practice, a form of parental engagement, has been documented to significantly contribute to early English oral language and literacy development for young English-speaking children (Burgess, Hecht, & Lonigan, 2002;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002), and English-learning children in the U.S (Farver et al., 2013;Trainin et al., 2017). A considerable body of literature supports that school literacy achievement is attributed to parental involvement and participation in home literacy practices in English as second language (ESL) context where English is the language of the society (Curry et al., 2016;Dixon & Wu, 2014;Farver et al., 2013;Lara-Alecio et al., 1998;Yeung & King, 2016). ...
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In this experimental study, we examined the impact of a curriculum-aligned, home-based literacy activity intervention on Chinese low-SES parents’ perceived engagement in their children's English language learning. The intervention was composed of a series of take-home activities in which parents were encouraged to interact and practice with their first-grade children in English speaking, listening, reading, and writing after school. These activities were designed based on the topic and vocabulary of each story in the curriculum and were sent home electronically each week. All materials required in the activities were provided with detailed instructions in Chinese. Parents were encouraged to record or take pictures of their child's work and share with the teachers and research team. A parental engagement survey adopted from previous research was administered among 172 parents before and after the intervention in both treatment and control conditions. Results of repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the home literacy intervention had a significant and positive effect on treatment parents’ reported engagement in their children's English language learning. Qualitative results from open-ended questions suggested that the home-based literacy activities not only supported student’ English learning outcome and parents’ English vocabulary, but also promoted students’ motivation in English learning, and fostered parent-child relationship. Implications for home-based English literacy activities in low-SES families were discussed.
... Another aspect of the HLE, direct teaching of print-related skills (e.g., letter recognition and letter sounds) has been found to predict children's alphabet knowledge Hood et al., 2008;Hindman and Morrison, 2012;Martini and Sénéchal, 2012), phonological awareness (Foy and Mann, 2003;Johnson et al., 2008;Niklas and Schneider, 2013), word reading (Puglisi et al., 2017), and writing (Puranik et al., 2018). Existing studies have combined a range of parent-child joint activities as a measure of the HLE in predicting early language and literacy outcomes (e.g., Griffin and Morrison, 1997;Leseman and de Jong, 1998;Wood, 2002;Van Steensel, 2006). ...
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Emerging evidence has shown a positive association between the home literacy environment (HLE) and monolingual children’s language and literacy development. Yet, far fewer studies have examined the impact of the HLE on second language development. This study examined relations between the HLE and children’s development of English as a second language in Hong Kong. Participants were 149 ethnic Chinese children (80 girls; Mage = 59 months, SDage = 10 months) and one of their caregivers. Caregivers completed questionnaires about their family backgrounds and HLE and children were assessed on their English language and literacy skills. Findings revealed considerable variability in the types of literacy activities that caregivers were engaged in at home with their children. A series of multilevel regressions demonstrated that the HLE was differentially associated with English vocabulary, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, and word reading skills after controlling for child and family characteristics. Results highlight the importance of a literacy-rich home environment for children’s development of English as a second language and the need to support caregivers in providing a range of home literacy activities to facilitate different language and literacy skills.
... The research conducted by Bohman et al. (2010) and Prevoo et al. (2014) revealed that there was a correlation between the level of parental education and the type of careers they had, in that the higher the levels of education and the more prestigious their careers, the more the L2 was used at work and at home. Child literacy development depends on the HLE (Niklas and Schneider 2013), with child-parent interaction and literacy activities focused on both oral language and on code skills (Krijnen et al. 2020;Lonigan et al. 2013). It is essential to ascertain the views on child literacy of all members of the family and the social network (Amantay 2017). ...
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Literacy is a broad term that includes reading and writing abilities, as well as cognitive skills that are socially and culturally constructed. Thus, it is essential to take the family context and home literacy environment (HLE) into consideration when discussing literacy. HLE affects reading and writing development via (in)formal literacy experiences focused on the development of oral language and code skills via exposure, child-centered and instructed activities. In this study, we investigated the effect of the family type (intermarriage/exogamous and co-ethnic/endogamous) and HLE on the development of literacy in bi-/multilingual children in Cyprus. The results of the study, which was based on qualitative methodology (questionnaires, interviews and observations), showed that there was a close relationship between the family type, family language policy (FLP), the HLE and the development of children’s language and literacy skills which, in addition, depended on their socioeconomic status (SES), the level of the parents’ education, life trajectories and experience, linguistic and cultural identities, status in the society, future plans for residency, and the education and careers of their children. Overall, Russian-speaking parents in immigrant contexts realized the importance of (early) child literacy experiences at home, as well as of multiliteracy and multimodality, and attempted to enhance these experiences both in Russian and in the majority language(s), mainly via formal, didactic activities focused on code skills.
... The present study also confirms the often-reported influence of home socioeconomic status on students' reading skills (for an overview, see Chiu and McBride-Chang 2006;Niklas and Schneider 2013;Philipp 2011;Rodriguez-Brown 2011). The power of this variable encompasses home literacy environment, highest education of parents and the occupational status of the parents presented by the HISEI. ...
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This study investigates the impact of the presence of students identified as having special needs (SEN) on their classmates’ achievements in reading comprehension. Multi-level regression modelling was conducted with the data of more than 75,000 fourth graders of 4,937 classes in Austria. Students’ scores of reading comprehension were used as the dependent variable in the models. The number of students with SEN was used as the independent variable, besides other class-level predictors like the socio-economic status or the self-concept. To disentangle individual from classroom composition aspects, variables at the individual level were used as independent variables as well (gender, age, first language, number of books at home, socio-economic background, kindergarten attendance, and self-concept). Results show only a small relationship (Cohen’s d = −0.16) between the presence of students with special needs on their classmates’ national standard scores, in particular compared to other class-composition effects like socio-economic status or self-concept.
... Mediante ésta se puede potenciar la comprensión y expresión del lenguaje oral y diversos aspectos convencionales de la lectura (por ejemplo, como el uso de los libros y las partes que lo componen), el reconocimiento de las letras y palabras; y establecer relaciones entre lenguaje oral y escrito (Grolig et al., 2019;Mol y Bus, 2011;Montag et al., 2015). Por lo tanto, el involucramiento familiar en prácticas tempranas de lectura compartida con los hijos muestra un impacto positivo en el desarrollo del lenguaje, así como en el desarrollo de destrezas específicas relacionadas con competencias lingüísticas de los niños (Bus, 2001;Bus et al., 1995;Dowdall et al., 2019;Niklas y Schneider, 2013). ...
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El presente estudio describe las creencias y prácticas familiares en torno a la literacidad inicial en hogares de contextos vulnerables. Participaron 79 familias de niños entre 1.5 y 5 años de edad de seis establecimientos en dos regiones del sur de Chile. Los participantes respondieron un cuestionario destinado a explorar las creencias y prácticas familiares relacionadas con la alfabetización emergente. Los resultados evidencian una alta exposición a la televisión en el tiempo libre, así como la utilización del lenguaje como regulador de la conducta. Respecto a sus prácticas vinculadas a la lectura, la mayoría de los encuestados declara enseñar explícita y sistemáticamente las letras a sus hijos, en cambio, un amplio porcentaje afirma no leer por gusto. Los resultados apoyan la idea de trabajar en red con las familias y desarrollar prácticas parentales que favorezcan la literacidad infantil en el hogar de forma temprana.
... Positive and warm relationships in which parents encourage the child are related to children's language and emergent literacy skills (Berlin et al., 1995;Tamis-LeMonda et al., 2001). The richness and diversity of verbal interactions and activities (e.g., shared reading) that parents provide at home, defined as the Home Language Environment (HLE), highly affects the language and literacy development of young children (Bus et al., 1995;Leseman & De Jong, 1998;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2014;Van Steensel, 2006). Recognizing the home environment with its informal nature as the most important setting for child learning can create new opportunities for teachers to enhance their language education of young children (Crosnoe et al., 2010;Pinkham & Neuman, 2012). ...
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Research Findings: The parental role in supporting young children’s oral language development at home is crucial for children’s language and literacy development. However, there is limited expertise in how teachers can support lower-educated parents effectively to enhance their interactions with their children and stimulate the use of language. Therefore, teachers need specific knowledge and training in how to establish partnerships with these parents and provide support adapted to the home language environment. This multiple case study describes the evaluation of a program for teachers aiming to build school-family partnerships focused on stimulating young children’s oral language development. It investigates abilities of 14 teachers to adhere to the program principles and to adapt these to parents’ needs by means of triangulation, using teacher self-reports and observations before and after implementation of the program. This study shows how teachers can increase their competences to work with parents and how this change contributes to professional satisfaction. Practice or Policy: This study contributes to understanding how an adaptive approach creates opportunities for teachers to extend their roles in classrooms and build partnerships with all parents, bridging the gap between lower-educated families and schools as the two most important domains where young children acquire language.
... Studies on differences in homebased parental involvement between migration background and non-migration background groups have reported less formal involvement shown by parents with a migration background, such as in Germany (e.g. Klein, Biedinger, and Becker 2014;Niklas and Schneider 2013) and the US (e.g. Raikes et al. 2006). ...
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Home-based parental involvement in early education is linked to beneficial outcomes in children’s development and may redress unequal educational outcomes associated with family background. The type of educational activities at home and the way parents provide their support may differ across parents with and without a migration background. It is unclear whether home-based parental involvement is measured as the same construct across different origin groups. In this study, the psychometric properties of two parent-report questionnaires on home-based parental involvement were evaluated in 131 Dutch mothers of kindergarten-aged children, of whom 47% had a migration background. The dimensional structure of both questionnaires was tested with Principal Component Analysis. Multi-group confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test for measurement invariance of the ‘Parenting Questionnaire’ across migration background. Results supported the multidimensional nature of home-based parental involvement, as formal and informal activities formed distinct components in the involvement of this diverse parent sample. In addition, measurement invariance was largely confirmed, indicating that parent’s involvement style can be validly measured across parents with and without a migration background in the Dutch context. Incorporating both formal and informal activities with involvement styles is recommended when measuring home-based parental involvement in different origin groups.
... Grieshaber, Shield, Luke, ve Macdonald, 2012;Kluczniok, Lehrl, Kuger, ve Rossbach, 2013;Niklas, Tayler, ve Schneider, 2015). Birçok çalışma çocukların erken okuryazarlık becerilerini destekleyen eviçi ortamlarını araştırmıştır (Dickinson ve McCabe, 2001;Foy ve Mann, 2003;Griffin ve Morrison, 1997;Hammer, Frakas ve Maczuga, 2010;Hart, Petrill, DeThorne, Deater-Deckard, Thompson, Schatschider ve Cutting, 2009;Johnson, Martin, Brooks-Gunn ve Petrill, 2008;Melnuish, Phan, Sylva, Sammons, Siraj-Blatchford ve Taggart, 2008;Niklas ve Schneider, 2013;Stephenson, Parrila, Georgiou ve Kirby, 2008;Tomopoulos vd., 2006;van Steensel, 2006). Bu araştırma sonuçlarına göre, annenin eğitim düzeyi, evde bulunan kitap sayısı, çocuklara evde ebeveynler tarafından düzenli kitap okunması, çocuklar ile konuşma, çocuklara ebeveynler tarafından evde sunulan zengin sözel dil uyarıcılarI, zengin materyal, oyuncak ve teknolojik aletler çocukların erken okuryazarlık becerileri ve dil gelişimlerini destekleyici faktörlerdir. ...
... As Yeung and Savage (2020) state, daily systematic teaching of grapheme-phoneme correspondences during shared reading of words in authentic texts promotes reading development. Previous studies have shown that the home literacy environment has a significant effect on children's literacy development across a variety of languages and cultural contexts (Liu et al., 2018;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Silinskas, Sénéchal et al., 2020;Zuilkowski et al., 2019). ...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic is leading to an unprecedented crisis worldwide. With schools closed, the frequency with which Spanish parents engage in home literacy activities with their children between the ages of 2 and 8 and the sociodemographic variables that influence this collaboration are unknown. The present research aimed to understand interactions among parents and children in the context of literacy activities at home. A total of 337 Spanish parents completed the Home Literacy Activities Questionnaire (HLAQ). Results from the reliability test showed a good adequacy and consistency (Cronbach’s alpha .85), and a factorial analysis indicated all items could be grouped into four factors: reading activities, writing activities, digital literacy activities, and dialogic-creative literacy activities. A latent class cluster analysis, based on parents’ factorial scores in the HLAQ and their sociodemographic data, suggested four discrete parental clusters: parents prioritizing writing activities, interested to practice all type of literacy activities, willing to do digital activities, or ready to practice dialogic-creative literacy activities. All indicators and sociodemographic characteristics – the children’s age, the number of children in the family, and the parents’ educational level – were significant and discriminated among the parental clusters. The activities carried out with least frequency were dialogic-creative literacy activities and digital literacy activities. Schools, as well as researchers, must be intentional about engaging families who may not be aware of certain activities to support their young children’s literacy skills, in times of crisis, for all children and families, for specific groups of families and children, and at varying grade levels. E-PRINT LINK TO THE ARTICLE: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/XUVJHKADHNHWMWA2GRN3/full?target=10.1080/10409289.2021.1916184
... Niklas und Schneider (2013) konnten zeigen, dass der frühe regelmäßige Umgang mit schriftsprachlichem Ma terial in der Familie ein bedeutsamer Prädiktor für spätere schulische Leistungen im Lesen und Rechtschreiben ist. Ähnliche Zusammenhänge fanden sich auch zwischen frühen familiären Anregungen zum Umgang mit Mengen und Zahlen und den späteren schulischen Mathema tikleistungen von Kindern (Niklas & Schneider, 2014). Daraus lässt sich nicht der Schluss ziehen, dass fehlende familiäre Anregungen spätere Lernstörungen verursa chen; ein Mangel an solchen Anregungen kann allerdings dazu führen, dass sich weniger vorteilhafte Entwicklun gen wichtiger Vorläufer der Schriftsprache und der Arith metik einstellen, was das Risiko für das spätere Auftreten von Lernstörungen erhöht. ...
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Zusammenfassung. Etwa jedes dritte Kind in Deutschland leidet im Laufe der Grundschule unter besonderen Lernschwierigkeiten beim Erwerb von Lesen, Rechtschreiben und Rechnen. Mindestens jedes achte Grundschulkind erfüllt sogar die Kriterien der Weltgesundheitsorganisation für die Vergabe der Diagnose „Lernstörung“. In diesem Beitrag wird erläutert, was unter Lernstörungen im Einzelnen zu verstehen ist und was über die biogenetischen und sozialen (einschließlich didaktischen) Risiken für das Entstehen von Lernstörungen bekannt ist. Außerdem wird auf den Forschungsstand zu der Frage eingegangen, welche eingeschränkten kognitiven Funktionen mit einem hohen individuellen Risiko für das Entstehen einer Lernstörung einhergehen. Es folgt ein Überblick über den Forschungsstand zu (vorschulischen) Präventionsansätzen, die sich als wirksam zur Vermeidung von Lernstörungen erwiesen haben, und zur Frage, welche Interventionsansätze bei Auftreten besonderer Lernschwierigkeiten beim Erwerb von Schriftsprache und Mathematik in der Schule am ehesten geeignet sind, diese zu überwinden. Darauf aufbauend werden abschließend Vorschläge zu einer sequentiellen Strategie für die weitgehende Vermeidung von Lernstörungen und ihren negativen Langzeitfolgen unterbreitet und die Potenziale digitaler diagnosebasierter Förderprogramme diskutiert.
... Studies from several countries have shown that HLE is consistently associated with literacy development in children despite the country, culture or native language of the family (e.g. Chen, Zhou, Zhao, & Davey, 2010;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Silinskas, Torppa, Lerkkanen, & Nurmi, 2020;van Steensel, 2006). However, a study that compared HLE in 25 countries, including developing and developed countries around the world (Park, 2008) shows that the quality of the HLE vary across countries and that they tend to be more favourable in more developed countries. ...
Article
Home Literacy Environment (HLE) plays a fundamental role in the development of reading and writing skills in children. Evidence suggests differences in HLE components based on cultural and idiosyncratic characteristics. Most studies show a relationship between contextual variables with the quality of HLE in typically developing (TD) children. There are HLE studies with families of children with Down syndrome (DS) that show similar results, but the characteristics of HLE for Latin-American families of children with DS remain unexplored. This study analyses the HLE in a group of 161 families of children with DS, between 3 and 12 years of age, living in urban areas of Chile. Data were collected using an online survey. Results showed differences on the amount of literacy materials, linguistic environment, and beliefs and expectations of par- ents. Better HLE was observed in families with parents with high educational levels. In the context of previous studies from developed countries with families of children with DS and from Chile with families of TD children, the HLE of families with children with DS in Chile seems poor. This descriptive evidence is necessary to raise concerns in policy makers and national funding agencies to open a way to conduct experimental studies.
... The terms "creating" and "meaning" are important here. There would be no reading if there is no sense being created" [1], [2] For some reason, students must learn to read. For starters, reading may aid in the development of a student's vocabulary. ...
... First, SES can have both direct effects on children's (reading) development, for example, through limited material resources and risk for a range of health and developmental problems (Chaudry & Wiemer, 2016;Currie & Goodman, 2020) and indirect effects through parental education, expectations, and aspirations (Davis-Kean, 2005). For instance, higher-SES parents have higher educational aspirations and higher expectations for their children's achievement at school and are more likely to provide rich language and reading environments compared with lower-SES parents, which likely translates into better reading achievement for students from higher-SES families (Davis-Kean, 2005;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Pace et al., 2017). ...
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Intersectional approaches have become increasingly important for explaining educational inequalities because they help to improve our understanding of how individual experiences are shaped by simultaneous membership in multiple social categories that are associated with interconnected systems of power, privilege, or oppression. For years, there has been a call in psychological and educational research for quantitative approaches that can account for the intersection of multiple social categories. The present paper introduces the Multilevel Analysis of Individual Heterogeneity and Discriminatory Accuracy (MAIHDA) approach, a novel intersectional approach from epidemiology, to study educational inequalities. The MAIHDA approach uses a multilevel model as the statistical framework to define intersectional strata that represent individuals’ membership in multiple social categories. By partitioning the variance within and between intersectional strata, the MAIHDA approach allows identifying intersectional effects at the strata level as well as obtaining information on the discriminatory accuracy of these strata for predicting individual educational outcomes. We provide a systematic review of its past application and illustrate the approach by analyzing inequalities in reading achievement in 40 unique intersectional strata (combining the social categories of gender, immigrant background, parental education, and parental occupational status) using representative data from 15-year-old students in Germany (N = 5,451). We show that compared to conventional quantitative intersectional approaches, MAIHDA analyses have several advantages, including better scalability for higher dimensions, model parsimony, and precision-weighted estimates of strata with small sample sizes. We conclude that the MAIHDA approach is a valuable intersectional tool to study inequalities in educational contexts.
... By virtue of suggesting two separate paths for parental influence, the model of Sénéchal and LeFevre (2002) is in line with the influential simple view of reading (Florit & Cain, 2011;Gough & Tunmer, 1986;Kirby & Savage, 2008) by showing how HLE practices may differentially contribute to the two components of reading comprehension: decoding and oral comprehension. Subsequently, the pathways in the HLE model have gained support in multiple language and educational contexts such as English (Hood, Conlon, & Andrews, 2008;Sénéchal & LeFevre, 2002, French (Sénéchal, 2006), Greek (Manolitsis, Georgiou, & Parrila, 2011;Manolitsis, Georgiou, & Tziraki, 2013), German (Niklas & Schneider, 2013, 2017, and Finnish . ...
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This study aimed to gain better understanding of the associations between literacy activities at home and long-term language and literacy development. We extended the home literacy environment (HLE) model of Sénéchal and LeFevre (Child Development [2002], Vol. 73, pp. 445–460) by including repeated assessments of shared reading, oral language, and reading comprehension development, including examination of familial risk for dyslexia as a moderator, and following development over time from ages 2 to 15 years. Of the 198 Finnish participants, 106 have familial risk for dyslexia due to parental dyslexia. Our path models include development in vocabulary (2–5.5 years), emerging literacy (5.5 years), reading fluency (8 and 9 years), and reading comprehension (8, 9, and 15 years) as well as shared book reading with parents (2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 years), teaching literacy at home (4.5 years), and reading motivation (8–9 years). The results supported the HLE model in that teaching literacy at home predicted stronger emerging literacy skills, whereas shared book reading predicted vocabulary development and reading motivation. Both emerging literacy and vocabulary predicted reading development. Familial risk for dyslexia was a significant moderator regarding several paths; vocabulary, reading fluency, and shared reading were stronger predictors of reading comprehension among children with familial risk for dyslexia, whereas reading motivation was a stronger predictor of reading comprehension among adolescents with no familial risk. The findings underline the importance of shared reading and suggest a long-standing impact of shared reading on reading development both directly and through oral language development and reading motivation.
... Several studies highlight that those distinct aspects of HLE provided to children during the preschool years are related, either individually or together, to children's language, emergent literacy, and later reading performance (e.g. Burris, Phillips, and Lonigan 2019;Niklas and Schneider 2013;Puglisi et al. 2017;Zhang et al. 2020). However, most studies have focused on preschool-aged children and only a few have examined children's HLE during the transition to elementary school (e.g. ...
Article
This study intends to extend previous work by examining associations between literacy-related beliefs and home literacy experiences during the transition from preschool to Grade 1, taking maternal education into consideration. Fifty-seven Portuguese children and their mothers participated. Data about families’ sociodemographic characteristics, home literacy environment, mothers’ interactive behaviours during storybook reading, and mothers’ literacy beliefs were collected in two moments during home visits. Overall results indicate that mothers’ educational level and literacy beliefs are variables of particular interest for understanding home literacy experiences. Together, mothers’ educational level and literacy beliefs explained a moderate proportion of the variance in reported and observed home literacy experiences, when children were at the end of preschool education, and one year later, when children were at the end of Grade 1. Moreover, findings reveal that mothers’ literacy beliefs contribute independently to the quantity and quality of home literacy experiences after controlling for maternal education. These findings have implications for professionals who have the responsibility of working with families to increase the likelihood of academic success, particularly in contexts that serve children at-risk for reading failure.
... Reasons for this disparity are assumed to include, among other things, access to various resources (Bornstein & Bradley, 2012) as well as more intensive and varied parent-child interactions as a function of SES (Davis-Kean, 2005;Hart & Risley, 1995;Hoff, 2003;Hoff-Ginsberg, 1991;Jackson et al., 2008;Kersten, 2022;Neumann, 2016;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Pace et al., 2017;Penner, 2018;Romeo et al., 2018;Rowe, 2008;Safwat & Sheikhany, 2015;Treiman et al. 2015; for an overview, see Fleitling et al., forthc.). Hart & Risley (1995), for instance, showed in their seminal study that input differences between academic and working class families amount to about 30 million words within the first three years of a child's life. ...
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Input quality is an important predictor of language acquisition. According to Truscott & Sharwood Smith (2019), input refers to all external situational and discourse contexts that contribute to a learner’s understanding of language. This, therefore, includes modifications of speech, nonverbal stimuli, materials, and all forms of stimulating activities in which language is embedded. Numerous studies within the cognitive interactionist framework have identified input quality constructs that have been shown to promote second/foreign language acquisition. Based on these findings, the Teacher Input Observation Scheme (TIOS; Kersten, 2021; Kersten et al., 2018, 2021a) operationalizes input quality across four scales, i.e. Cognitively Stimulating Tasks, Verbal Input, Non-verbal Input, and Support of Leaners’ Output. Items within these scales include rich and varied comprehensible input, authentic and meaningful conversational contexts combined with a focus on negotiation of meaning and corrective feedback and cognitively stimulating problem-solving activities, and the children’s activation of prior world knowledge. At the same time, approaches that promote academic language competence in the majority language in subject matter classrooms, i.e., the first language (L1) of most but not all of the learners, are gaining momentum. While some of these approaches focus on techniques similar to those used in L2 research (Echevarría et al., 2006, 2017; Gogolin et al., 2020), studies on the effects of this type of language-sensitive instruction on learners’ L1 proficiency are still rare (Becker-Mrotzek et al., 2021). Given the growing call for more systematic research in this area, it seemed plausible to also investigate the effects of techniques operationalized with the TIOS on learners’ competences in the majority language, German. The present study, therefore, investigates whether language-stimulating techniques predict learners’ language proficiency in English- and German-language classrooms, and whether they can compensate for learners’ socioeconomic differences to some extent. To that end, an online survey was carried out with n = 39 L2 English teachers (grade 4) and n = 37 teachers in German subject matter classrooms (grades 4-6) in Germany. The survey elicited teachers’ input strategies via the TIOS protocol, and students’ language proficiency in L2 English (n = 690) and German (n = 836) via CEFR (Council of Europe, 2020) and Lingualevel (Mettler et al., 2007) descriptors, learners’ status of multilingualism and class-level socioeconomic status (SES). Regression analyses showed that stimulating tasks and SES predicted L2 proficiency; stimulating tasks, and verbal input, and SES positively predicted German proficiency, whereas multilingualism yielded a negative effect only for German. Finally, two moderation analyses showed that TIOS techniques moderated the effect of SES on learners’ language proficiency in both English and German. These results suggest that input quality is able to buffer negative socioeconomic effects in language learning in both languages, and that its operationalization as used in this study is transferable to language-sensitive instruction in the schools’ majority language.
... In addition to the classroom-based independent reading discussed above, regular literacy participation at home is an important contributor to the overall time spent reading that is correlated with increased reading achievement (Hudson & Williams, 2015;Reutzel et al., 2012;Wu & Samuels, 2004) and improved motivation and academic self-concept (Mitchell, 2018). It is well documented that the home literacy environment directly impacts children's linguistic skill and reading achievement (Burgess, Hecht, & Lonigan, 2002;Foy & Mann, 2003;Niklas & Schneider, 2015;Roberts, Jurgens, & Burchinal, 2005), and evidence shows that improvements in the home literacy environment can mitigate the negative impact of low socioeconomic status on literacy development (Niklas & Schneider, 2013). ...
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... Hence, although it might appear that children's emergent literacy skills begin developing once they start preschool, there is evidence to suggest that literacy development is a continuous process which begins much earlier in the child's life . Recent research in this area postulates that literacy development begins at birth (Dowling et al., 2020) and that literacy development is positively affected by frequent parental engagement in literacy activities prior to preschool (Niklas & Schneider, 2013). However, many children complete preschool without having acquired these skills (Tindal et al., 2015), which affects their ability to benefit from literacy instruction at the early stages of primary school . ...
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... Acquisition of early literacy skills is affected by both endogenous variables such as the children's general language development and working memory and the exogenous variables such as home literacy environment and SES (Ergül et al., 2021;Inoue et al., 2018;Torppa et al., 2006). Indeed early literacy skills mostly develop in children's home or school environment through the support of adults (Li & Fleer, 2015;Niklas & Schneider, 2013;Roberts et al., 2005). Children's access to written materials, engagement in literacy activities and observations of such activities contribute significantly to the development of early literacy (Van Steensel, 2006). ...
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This study developed a learning model to improve students’ early reading skills in Indonesia. The model is based on social cognitive learning theory and is implemented using interactive multimedia. The research method uses Design-Based Research (DBR) and the subjects are 195 first and second graders of an elementary school in Bandung, West Java. The findings of the study show that social cognitive learning can be integrated and implemented through interactive multimedia and that interactive-multimedia-assisted social cognitive model (IMAS Model) can improve early reading skills. Students’ average early reading skill scores were measured using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) instrument before and after intervention to see the effectiveness of the model. Pre-test – post-test results comparison showed that students’ average early reading scores increased after learning using IMAS Model. Students’ average scores of reading letters, reading syllables, reading words, reading sentences, and reading comprehension skills at pre-test were 78.06, 67.06, 60.92, 55.21, and 44.95, respectively. These scores respectively increased to 92.71, 92.45, 88.58, 74.60, and 87.08 at post-test, indicating that IMAS Model is effective to increase early reading skills.
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This report summarizes findings from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development as effect sizes for exclusive maternal care and-for children in child care-type, quality, and quantity of care. Children (n = 1,261) were recruited at birth and assessed at 15, 24, 36, and 54 months. Exclusive maternal care did not predict child outcomes, but multiple features of child-care experience were modestly to moderately predictive. Higher quality child care was related to advanced cognitive, language, and preacademic outcomes at every age and better socio-emotional and peer outcomes at some ages. More child-care hours predicted more behavior problems and conflict, according to care providers. More center-care time was related to higher cognitive and language scores and more problem and fewer prosocial behaviors, according to care providers. Child-care effect sizes are discussed from 3 perspectives: (a) absolute effect sizes, reflecting established guidelines; (b) relative effect sizes, comparing child-care and parenting effects; and (c) possible individual and collective implications for the large numbers of children experiencing child care.
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Statistical procedures for missing data have vastly improved, yet misconception and unsound practice still abound. The authors frame the missing-data problem, review methods, offer advice, and raise issues that remain unresolved. They clear up common misunderstandings regarding the missing at random (MAR) concept. They summarize the evidence against older procedures and, with few exceptions, discourage their use. They present, in both technical and practical language, 2 general approaches that come highly recommended: maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian multiple imputation (MI). Newer developments are discussed, including some for dealing with missing data that are not MAR. Although not yet in the mainstream, these procedures may eventually extend the ML and MI methods that currently represent the state of the art. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The psychometric utility of a home literacy environment measure is evaluated and its unique contribution to predicting literacy skills is examined. The scale is derived from information provided by parents of kindergarten children about the amount of reading materials in the home, and the frequency of library visits, adult literacy‐related behaviors, adult‐child reading, and television viewing. Measures of language, reading, general knowledge and math were collected from 295 children in fall of kindergarten and spring of second grade. The home literacy environment scale predicts unique variance in kindergarten and second grade language‐based, but not number‐based, literacy skills. Hence, the simple and easily administered measure of the home literacy environment proves to be psychometrically strong and uniquely predictive of differences in early literacy skills.
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Argues that there is reason to be more optimistic concerning the effects of reading to preschoolers than is suggested by H. S. Scarborough and W. Dobrich's (see record 1995-09013-001) review. First, methodological problems in many of the studies indicate that they should be interpreted with caution. Effects are likely to be underestimated by equally weighting good and poor studies. Second, extant studies indicate that there are direct and indirect links between reading to preschoolers and reading achievement. Simultaneous consideration of these different paths yields larger estimates of the effect. Third, even initially small effects of reading to preschoolers are likely to have larger long-term consequences on children's reading abilities. Issues concerning a focus on alternative models are also discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Reviewed research from 1960 to 1993 pertaining to the hypothesized influence of parent–preschooler reading experiences on the development of language and literacy skills. The literature provides evidence for this association, although the magnitudes of the observed effects have been quite variable within and between samples and, on average, have been unexpectedly modest. Demographic, attitudinal, and skill differences among preschoolers all apparently made stronger direct contributions to prediction in investigations that permitted such comparisons. These findings are discussed with respect to theory and research on literacy acquisition, educational practice, and parental guidance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Emergent literacy consists of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that are developmental precursors to reading and writing. This article offers a preliminary typology of children's emergent literacy skills, a review of the evidence that relates emergent literacy to reading, and a review of the evidence for linkage between children's emergent literacy environments and the development of emergent literacy skills. We propose that emergent literacy consists of at least two distinct domains: inside-out skills (e.g., phonological awareness, letter knowledge) and outside-in skills (e.g., language, conceptual knowledge). These different domains are not the product of the same experiences and appear to be influential at different points in time during reading acquisition. Whereas outside-in skills are associated with those aspects of children's literacy environments typically measured, little is known about the origins of inside-out skills. Evidence from interventions to enhance emergent literacy suggests that relatively intensive and multifaceted interventions are needed to improve reading achievement maximally. A number of successful preschool interventions for outside-in skills exist, and computer-based tasks designed to teach children inside-out skills seem promising. Future research directions include more sophisticated multidimensional examination of emergent literacy skills and environments, better integration with reading research, and longer-term evaluation of preschool interventions. Policy implications for emergent literacy intervention and reading education are discussed.