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QEEG Spectral and Coherence Assessment of Autistic Children in Three Different Experimental Conditions

Authors:
  • Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery Havana Cuba
  • The National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Havana, Cuba

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We studied autistics by quantitative EEG spectral and coherence analysis during three experimental conditions: basal, watching a cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio band (VwA). Significant reductions were found for the absolute power spectral density (PSD) in the central region for delta and theta, and in the posterior region for sigma and beta bands, lateralized to the right hemisphere. When comparing VwA versus the V-A in the midline regions, we found significant decrements of absolute PSD for delta, theta and alpha, and increments for the beta and gamma bands. In autistics, VwA versus V-A tended to show lower coherence values in the right hemisphere. An impairment of visual and auditory sensory integration in autistics might explain our results.
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