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Wood from Planted Forests A Global Outlook 2005-2030

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Planted forests constituted only 7 percent of the global forest area, or about 271 million hectares, in the year 2005, but they contributed a higher proportion of overall forest goods and services. In recent years, the broader significance and importance of planted forests have been recognized internationally, and standards for their responsible management have been established, relating to social and environmental as well as economic benefits. As one of the important provisions from planted forests, this study examined their future potential production of wood. From a baseline survey of 61 countries, 666 management schemes were established for planted forests, taking into account tree species, rotation lengths, production potential and end uses of wood. With an assumed average efficiency rate of 70 percent, the potential industrial wood production in 2005 from planted forests was estimated at 1.2 billion m 1 or about two-thirds of the overall wood production in that year. Scenarios until 2030 (detailed) and 2105 (simplified) were developed, indicating that wood production from planted forests may increase considerably. Results are provided with breakdowns by region, species groups and end-use categories. It is concluded that the significance of planted forests, and recognition of their contributions to a range of development goals, are likely to increase in coming decades.
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... As a response to this reduction in supply and increased market demand for forest products, the area of forest plantations has been expanding (Evans 2010;Payn et al. 2015). While industrial plantations comprise the majority of this expansion (Carle and Holmgren 2008;McEwan et al. 2020), smallholder commercial forestry is also increasing in areas where land available for larger plantations has become constrained (Maraseni et al. 2017b;Midgley et al. 2017a). Smallholder forestry has become prevalent in places like Vietnam (Maraseni et al. 2017b), Java (Race and Wettenhall 2016) and northeast and central Thailand (Boulay et al. 2012;Schirmer et al. 2015). ...
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In this article, overlapping generations are extracting a natural resource over an infinite future. We examine the fair allocation of resource and compensations among generations. Fairness is defined by core lower bounds and aspiration upper bounds. The core lower bounds require that every coalition of generations obtains at least what it could achieve by itself. The aspiration upper bounds require that no coalition of generations enjoys a higher welfare than it would achieve if nobody else extracted the resource. We show that, upon existence, the allocation that satisfies the two fairness criteria is unique and assigns to each generation its marginal contribution to the preceding generation. Finally, we describe the dynamics of such an allocation.
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