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Abstract

In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 393), Lactobacillus lactis (ATCC 7830) and Lactobacillus fermentum (ATCC 9338) and L. reuteri strains were isolated from goat, sheep, cattle and camel rumen. The bacterial strains were cultured anaerobically in MRS broth and MRS agar at 37±1°C and administered (10 6 CFU/mL) separately to 1 day-old Lohman, Hubbard and Ross broiler chicks once a week for four weeks. The microbial strains showed potential for improving synthesis of B12, B6, lysine, methionine and cystine in all breeds as well as lowering cholesterol levels in poultry meat and liver. The L. reuteri strain led to B6 and B12 concentrations of 31% and 8.8%, respectively, in the Lohman breed. In meat leg, there was a 30 and 80% increase in vitamin B6 and B12, respectively, and 27% cholesterol reduction by Hubbard administered L. reuteri. Lohman, Hubbard and Ross broiler breeds showed a significant (P<0.05) increase in vitamin and amino acid synthesis and enhanced their ability to lower cholesterol either in leg and/or breast of poultry meat cuts. The L. reuteri and L. plantarum strains could be used to enrich poultry meat with naturally synthesized vitamins, amino acids or production of low cholesterol and functional poultry meat.
Journal of Food, Agriculture & Environment Vol.11 (2), Part I: 604-609. 2013
Administration of lactic acid bacteria to enhance synthesis of
vitamin B12 and B6 and lower cholesterol levels in poultry
meat
Abdur-Rahman A. Al-Fataftah
1
, S. M. Herzallah
2
*, K. Alshawabkeh
1
and Salam
A. Ibrahim
3
1
Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture,The University of Jordan,
11942 Amman, Jordan.
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of
Agriculture, Mut’tah University, 61710 Karak, Jordan.
3
Food Microbiology and
Biotechnology Laboratory, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC
27411-1064. *e-mail: saqermay30@yahoo.com, saqer.herzallah@mcgill.ca
Abstract
In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 393),
Lactobacillus lactis (ATCC 7830) and Lactobacillus fermentum (ATCC 9338) and L.
reuteri strains were isolated from goat, sheep, cattle and camel rumen. The bacterial
strains were cultured anaerobically in MRS broth and MRS agar at 37±1°C and
administered (10
6
CFU/mL) separately to 1 day-old Lohman, Hubbard and Ross broiler
chicks once a week for four weeks. The microbial strains showed potential for improving
synthesis of B12, B6, lysine, methionine and cystine in all breeds as well as lowering
cholesterol levels in poultry meat and liver. The L. reuteri strain led to B6 and B12
concentrations of 31% and 8.8%, respectively, in the Lohman breed. In meat leg, there
was a 30 and 80% increase in vitamin B6 and B12, respectively, and 27% cholesterol
reduction by Hubbard administered L. reuteri. Lohman, Hubbard and Ross broiler breeds
showed a significant (P<0.05) increase in vitamin and amino acid synthesis and enhanced
their ability to lower cholesterol either in leg and/or breast of poultry meat cuts. The L.
reuteri and L. plantarum strains could be used to enrich poultry meat with naturally
synthesized vitamins, amino acids or production of low cholesterol and functional poultry
meat.
Key words: Amino acids, B12, B6, broiler, cholesterol, lactic acid bacteria.
... Whereas, the total cholesterol content observed in wild CQ (64.4 mg/100 g of meat) is quite below that range, but we found no comparison for it. The total cholesterol content of poultry meat is influenced by several variables, as food composition (Sk rivan et al., 2000;Ponte et al., 2004), and gastrointestinal microbiome (Al-Fataftah et al., 2013). Thus, differences in the diet composition, together with differences in gastrointestinal microbiome between wild and farmed quails could influence meat's cholesterol content of quail's breast meat. ...
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