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Clinical force production of TheraBand® elastic bands

Authors:

Abstract

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify the resistance offered by 7 progressive colors of Thera-Band ® elastic band (The Hygenic Corporation, Akron, OH); and (2) to determine the relationship between resistance and percent elongation within the 7 intensities of Thera-Band ® elastic band using 4 different starting lengths. Methods: Thera-Band ® elastic bands (yellow, red, green, blue, black, silver, gold) were tested to determine force production with elongation. Each of the 7 levels of Thera-Band ® elastic bands was evaluated using the same protocol. First, one random sample of each specific product color was cut and attached in lengths of 18", 24", 30", and 36". One end of the band was attached to a Thera-Band ® Exercise Handle. The other end was attached to a plastic fastening clip. The plastic clip was then attached to a fixed ITC strain gauge (Innovative Research and Development, Inc., Murray, UT), which measured the amount of resistance generated by the band to the nearest 0.5 pounds. Each band was manually stretched at a rate of 1 inch per second. Strain gauge measurements were recorded at 25% increases in elongation up to 250% of elongation from the initial length of the sample. Each sample was tested five times in the same manner. Data analysis: Stepwise regression equations were constructed to determine the relationship between resistance and percent elongation.
CLINICAL FORCE PRODUCTION OF THERA-BAND
®
ELASTIC BANDS. Page, P, Labbe, A,
Topp RV. HealthSouth, Metairie, LA. Supported by the Hygenic Corporation.
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify the resistance offered by 7 progressive colors of
Thera-Band
®
elastic band (The Hygenic Corporation, Akron, OH); and (2) to determine the relationship
between resistance and percent elongation within the 7 intensities of Thera-Band
®
elastic band using 4
different starting lengths.
Methods: Thera-Band
®
elastic bands (yellow, red, green, blue, black, silver, gold) were tested to determine
force production with elongation. Each of the 7 levels of Thera-Band
®
elastic bands was evaluated using
the same protocol. First, one random sample of each specific product color was cut and attached in lengths
of 18”, 24”, 30”, and 36”. One end of the band was attached to a Thera-Band
®
Exercise Handle. The other
end was attached to a plastic fastening clip. The plastic clip was then attached to a fixed ITC strain gauge
(Innovative Research and Development, Inc., Murray, UT), which measured the amount of resistance
generated by the band to the nearest 0.5 pounds. Each band was manually stretched at a rate of 1 inch per
second. Strain gauge measurements were recorded at 25% increases in elongation up to 250% of elongation
from the initial length of the sample. Each sample was tested five times in the same manner.
Data analysis: Stepwise regression equations were constructed to determine the relationship between
resistance and percent elongation.
Results: Linear regression equations were established for each color (Table 1). There was a strong linear
relationship (p<.000) between resistance and percent elongation for each of the 7 Thera-Band
®
intensities
across the four starting band lengths. The calculated r
2
ranged from .947 to .988.
Table 1: Regression Equations for Thera-Band
®
elastic bands
Band color Regression equation r
2
p<
Yellow R = 0.788 + .0202(E) .973 .000
Red R = 1.367 + .0229(E) .947 .000
Green R = 1.525 + .0325(E) .981 .000
Blue R = 2.323 + .0443(E) .981 .000
Black R = 3.223 + .0587(E) .981 .000
Silver R = 4.053 + .0856(E) .987 .000
Gold R = 6.882 + .1350(E) .988 .000
R=resistance in pounds; E=percent elongation from initial length
Conclusions
1. Thera-Band
®
elastic bands provide a consistent, linear, and predictable increase in force with
elongation across all colors
2. Regression equations can be used to clinically quantify Thera-Band
®
elastic resistance based on
elongation
3. Thera-Band
®
elastic bands yield consistent percent elongation to resistance relationships within each
color
Clinical Relevance: Force production of Thera-Band
®
elastic bands is dependent on percent elongation
regardless of initial starting length. Clinicians can predict applied forces while using Thera-Band
®
elastic
bands in order to improve exercise dosing and prescription. These findings also provide a mechanism to
compare strength training using Thera-Band
®
resistance with more traditional modes of strength training
when prescribing home exercise programs.
Reference: Journal of Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2000. 30(1):A-47-48.
Presented at the APTA Combined Section Meeting, February, 2000 in New Orleans, LA
... However, exercise intensity prescription and progression with the elastic bands differs between studies, likely due to a more challenging objective load quantification. Typically, changing one color to another increases resistance from 20 to 30% (15). However, there are no previous studies corroborating the number of resistance increments needed during a typical COPD Abbreviations: COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; nRMS, normalized root mean square; RF, rectus femoris; VL, vastus lateralis; VM, vastus medialis; RPE, rate of perceived exertion; sEMG, surface electromyography. ...
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... The load was set at 70% of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction measured using a dynamometer (model DLC/DN; Kratos, São Paulo, SP, Brazil). The intensity adjustments were made by increasing the load of the elastic bands 19 and were guided by the level of dyspnea or fatigue of the trained muscle group. 17 Follow-up: The participants received a weekly phone call and a supervised session at home every two weeks. ...
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... For each contraction, subjects were required to dorsiflex the foot to the stop. Following this, the foot was placed under a blue theraband which was affixed to the board and provides resistance as described by Page et al. [15]. The subjects practised dorsiflexing the foot, with the resistance of the theraband, to the stop, approx. ...
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