Article

The sensitivity and impact of dye structure and fibre micronaire on the increased dyeability of bioengineered cotton fibres

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Abstract

Previous research reported on a screening method to assess the functionalisation of bioengineered cotton fibres through the absorption of CI Acid Orange 7. The aim of the present paper is to extend this study to different dye classes. Thus the dye absorption of bioengineered cotton fibres containing oligochitin is studied for a series of dye classes. Statistically significant differences were found between cotton lines designed to produce oligochitin in the fibre and their respective controls for all tested dyes, confirming previous results with CI Acid Orange 7. Further, although variations in micronaire influenced dye absorption, it was confirmed for all dyes tested as well as for CI Acid Orange 7 that the oligochitin production had a larger impact on the exhaustion values than the differences in micronaire. The method described in this paper can be applied as a screening tool to meet the challenge of working with small quantities of fibrous materials. Moreover it shows the potential that the incorporated oligochitin has for increasing dyeability with a wide range of dyes and creating fibres with more versatile reactivity.

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Chapter
Considering the environmental impact, the dyeing industry is one of the most notorious industries. The dyeing process involves the transfer of dye to the finished textile to add permanent and long-lasting colour. For decades, various dyeing techniques for natural fibres have been developed to provide the desired shades and colour fastness to the fabric. The conventional dyeing methods of natural fibres consume a huge amount of water during the dyeing processes and finishing operation, require lots of energy and produce an enormous amount of chemicals as wastage, which are discharged into the water bodies along with unfixed dyes as industrial effluent, thus causing severe water pollution. Thus there are several environmental and sustainable issues related to the dyeing industry, which must be addressed immediately. In this chapter, we will shed light on such issues and will discuss recent developments in this context.
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