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Foundations of a New Discipline.
... Some of the practices that are effective in enabling and fostering organizational resilience are to provide training and development of resiliency (Coutu, 2002). Resilience focuses more on the cultural change to facilitate problems (Sutcliffe and Vogus, 2003). Tierney (2003) organizational resilience is a structural construct with the dimensions of robustness, resourcefulness, redundancy, and rapidity. ...
... Tierney (2003) organizational resilience is a structural construct with the dimensions of robustness, resourcefulness, redundancy, and rapidity. Vogus (2003), is based on factor analysis that identify structural resources, emotional resources, and cognitive resources, which are resources linked to organizational creativity. ...
... Organizational resilience is an optimistic perspective focusing on the enhancement of safety and reliability and understanding of coping with the scenario (Sutcliffe, & Vogus, 2003). Organizational resilience is the ability to maintain positive adjustment, which emerge from conditions strengthened and more resourceful under challenging conditions (Sutcliffe and Vogus, 2003). ...
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This chapter has analyzes the organization resilience and its implications on organizational structural construct based on a framework for elements for reliability, safety, and deployment of organizational resources. It is assumed that theoretical and empirical studies in organizational resilience have limited contributions on the concepts of high-reliability organization applied to a diversity of entities and with a variety of characteristics. The method employed is the analytical reflective of the theoretical and empirical literature review. This study concludes that the emerging concept of organizational resilience confirms that the creation and development of an organizational resilience framework for structural construct can be supported by elements based on flexibility of organizational culture, organizational safety and reliability, the promotion elements, and the deployment of organizational resources.
... As the "chief crisis officers" of companies, CEOs are expected by stakeholders to demonstrate organizations' capabilities to recover from this public health crisis. Such capabilities to bounce back, restore normal functioning, maintain positive adjustments, and even exploit new opportunities under challenging conditions such as crisis situations, is conceptualized as organizational resilience (Lengnick-Hall et al., 2003;Sutcliffe & Vogus, 2003). It includes not only "hard" resilience (i.e., a preparation of robust and spare resources and facilities) but also "soft" resilience through risk management and timely effective communication within the organization and with various external stakeholders (Miao et al., 2013). ...
... In addition to giving sense to the COVID-19 crisis, CEOs also delivered their high levels of response efficacy and self-efficacy via expressing confidence in organizations' capabilities and specific measures to tackle various dilemmas caused by the pandemic (e.g., global supply chain crisis). By doing so, CEOs signaled their companies' organizational resilience to recover from the pandemic and maintain positive adjustments during such challenging conditions (Sutcliffe & Vogus, 2003). The identification of crisis sensegiving and efficacy enhancement topics contained in CEO open letters indicated the relevance of organizational resilience as a theoretical framework to understand how CEOs and their companies communicate with both internal and external stakeholders. ...
... Current literature shows the strong impact of COVID-19 and associated lockdown measures on nonprofits but remains largely silent on how nonprofits react to the pandemic. Their resilience to external shocks, defined as the ability to realize positive adaptation when confronted with threats (Sutcliffe & Vogus, 2003), is usually studied in relation to organizational characteristics and capacities. Such studies, for example, reveal how the financial vulnerability is linked to responsive actions (Tuckman & Chang, 1991). ...
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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) health crisis imposes severe pressures on nonprofit organizations, which must be resilient to respond effectively to extreme environmental tensions. We combined resource dependence theory with stakeholder theory to frame to what extent nonprofits experienced resource pressures through various stakeholder channels and the nonprofit governance responses. We empirically investigated international medical research and education nonprofits during the COVID‐19 pandemic. Our results indicate resource decreases in nearly all stakeholder channels. In response, nonprofit boards increased activity levels by mainly focusing on adapting organizational offerings and increasing support to the organization. Managerial executives also increased their activity levels, by focusing on safeguarding financial stability, planning and adapting operations to confinement measures.
... Proactive training provides workers with necessary resources to deal with challenges or obstacles when they occur. Sutcliffe and Vogus (2003) established strategies to enhance resilience at the individual, group, and organizational levels. They allow workers' to enhance competence and efficacy through increasing their access to personal and external resources, improving their learning attitude, and organizing their experiences. ...
... Psikolojik sağlamlığı yüksek olan bireylerin kendini toparlayabilmesinin kolay olduğu, stresten hızlıca kurtulabildiği, psikolojik sorunları atlatma ve gelişen şartlara esnek biçimde uyum sağlamada başarılı olduğu kabul edilmektedir (Doğan, 2015a: 94;Akçakanat ve diğerleri, 2018: 175). Psikolojik sağlamlık ile çalışanların performansları, iş tatminleri ve örgütsel bağlılıkları arasında pozitif ve anlamlı ilişkiler olduğu belirlenmiştir (Luthans ve diğerleri, 2007;Sutcliffe ve Vogus, 2003;Erkuş ve Fındıklı, 2013). Ancak psikolojik dayanıklılığın iş performansı üzerinde anlamlı bir etkisinin bulunmadığını rapor eden çalışmalar da bulunmaktadır (Örneğin Öğüt ve Kaplan, 2015; Karaman ve diğerleri, 2020). ...
... Organizational resilience comprises processes focused on the retainment of resources (both cognitive and structural) in a malleable form, allowing for coping capabilities within organizations (Sutcliffe & Vogus 2003). Organizational resilience also requires the creation of a culture of organizational learning that encourages a conscious response to challenges and subsequent reflection on the effects and effectiveness those initiated responses to create a climate for ongoing learning (Putz et al. 2012). ...
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For some time, the term resilience has been used in project management research to address the ability to organize under a variety of scenarios of uncertainty and sudden change, including disruptions in the form of shocks or stressors. This paper examines the prerequisites in projects, organizations, and teams as well as individuals for resilient management of projects based on two complementary empirical sources First, the results of eight case vignettes based on semi-structured online interviews with project management practitioners are presented. Subsequently, results were reviewed and enriched with the experiences of experienced project managers in a group discussion. Findings highlight the importance of preparation and awareness, diversity and equality in the team and information relationships. On the other hand, resilient organizations are characterized more formalization, centralized and individualistic decision-making. Above all project managers acting prudently and flexibly along the time axis from incubation to coping and recovery.
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It is inevitable for organizations to face crisis. Resilience, at an organizational level, describes the inherent qualities which enable organizations to plan for, response to and recover from emergencies and crises. This qualitative research aims to study organizational resilience in businesses after crisis. Data were collected from high-level executives who are the key informants during the experience of significant crisis within organizations in diverse small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Critical incident technique (CIT) was employed to study situations from the viewpoints of executives and to look for the factors that contribute to organizational resilience. The results show that (1) Executives do not prepare and plan in advance in order to achieve organizational resilience, (2) The important factors of resilience is the organizations’ ability to adapt, including leadership, networking and relationships, staff engagement, innovation and creativity, and (3) Some executives believe that luck and mindfulness plays a role in the organizational resilience or in their ability to survive and recover from crisis.
The aim of this study is to examine the role of Compassion towards others as a mediator between Social Job Resources (social support climate, coordination, and positive leadership), Healthy Employees (psychological well-being such as resilience, engagement, and optimism) and Healthy Organisational Outcomes (in-role performance, extra-role performance and commitment) from a gender perspective in healthcare professionals. Through the multiple analyses of variance, structural equation models, and multiple-group analyses in a sample of 1420 healthcare professionals from different public and private hospitals in Spain, this study proved the existence of gender differences, with women perceiving higher levels of Compassion. Moreover, this study shows that Compassion partially mediates the relationship between Social Job Resources and Healthy Employees. In addition, Compassion partially mediates the relationship between Social Job Resources and Healthy Organisational Outcomes. Finally, Healthy Employees mediate the positive relationship between Social Job Resources and Healthy Organisational Outcomes. This is an innovative contribution to the limited research examining Compassion towards others as a personal resource that can have a positive impact in the workplace. The results also propose a way to develop and conduct interventions in order to increase Compassion towards others in the healthcare context.
Chapter
Next, this chapter—“Refugee Entrepreneurs Building and Displaying Resilience”—examines how refugees can harness entrepreneurial action to find a positive identity and better life under difficult circumstances. Against a theoretical backdrop comprising resilience, positive psychology, and positive organizational scholarship, we explore the important role entrepreneurial action plays in generating positive outcomes by investigating long-term refugee entrepreneurs (in refugee camps and not in camps) over 15 months. In particular, we describe the motivation underlying entrepreneurial action in highly constrained environments (in which the constraints go beyond a lack of financial resources) and explain the causes and consequences of entrepreneurs’ resilience in the face of severe constraints that create significant and ongoing adversity. Overall, this chapter shows that entrepreneurial action can help individuals achieve resilient outcomes in the face of adversity without addressing the underlying source of that adversity. We also hope this chapter changes the way people think about refugees starting and running illegal businesses.
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