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GSA: Stata module to perform generalized sensitivity analysis

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Abstract

gsa produces a figure for the sensitivity analysis similar to Imbens (American Economic Review, 2003). Observational studies cannot control for the bias due to the omission of unobservables. The sensitivity analysis provides a graphical benchmark about how strong assumption about unobservables researchers need to make to maintain the causal interpretation of the result. Among various sensitivity analyses, gsa often serves as the most accessible option because it minimizes the changes that researchers need to make in their models to conduct a sensitivity analysis.

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