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Social Powers and Effective Classroom Management: Enhancing Teacher–Student Relationships

Authors:
Behavior Management
Intervention in School and Clinic XX(X) 1 –6
© Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2011
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10.1177/1053451211
406543
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Social Powers and Eective
Classroom Management:
Enhancing Teacher-Student
Relationships
... Close-tie members are far more emotionally attached to support seekers and are more likely to resort to emotional support (Wellman & Wortley, 1990). Weak-tie relationships, such as teacher-student relationships differ from parental relationships and friendships on the basis of communication that explicitly addresses power and professionalism (Alderman & Green, 2011;Bigelow, Tesson, & Lewko, 1992). Weak-tie relationships, particularly teacher-student relationships, are less emotionally attached and possess more tightly defined roles, with more concrete behavioral expectations that make up these roles (e.g., teachers are expected to assist; Wright & Miller, 2010). ...
... As a weak-tie member, the support provider may actually have greater power to change the stressful situation. Due to the power dynamics and tightly defined roles between students and teachers, as well as teachers' knowledge of school policies and resources (Alderman & Green, 2011;Bigelow et al., 1992), teachers can provide important information on how to manage and prevent the stressor. These results have relevance for situations similar to school bullying, such as bullying in the workplace or other forms of organizations where there are tightly defined roles between individuals, and when a stressor requires action to manage and prevent it. ...
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Many students who seek out teachers for help when getting bullied report receiving unhelpful support. We theorized that the placement of support types (emotional, informational, network) in a conversation influences participants’ (N = 640) supportiveness evaluations. Results suggest that 1) conversations with more than one support type were evaluated as most supportive; 2) conversations featuring network support anywhere were viewed as more supportive; and 3) the emotional support–only conversation was viewed as least supportive, whereas the emotional-and-network support conversation was viewed as most supportive. We end by providing useful information for bullied students’ postbullying adjustments and bullying education curricula for teachers.
... Une relation de bonne qualité s'appuie sur des éloges plutôt que sur des critiques persistantes(Marzano et al., 2003). Des relations enseignant-élèves efficaces minimisent les comportements perturbateurs qui gênent l'enseignement, créant ainsi un climat social de classe susceptible de favoriser l'apprentissage pour tous les élèves(Alderman et Green, 2011 ;Parsonson, 2012). D'autres études complémentaires révèlent que des relations enseignantenfant de haute qualité peuvent favoriser la résilience scolaire chez les enfants à faible revenu, issus de minorités raciales ou ethniques, à risque de mauvais résultats(Crosnoe et al., 2010 ;Murray et Zvoch, 2010).Pakarinen et al. (2014) ont étudié les relations entre la qualité des interactions en classe et les comportements des enfants dans des situations d'évaluation. ...
Thesis
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L’explicitation des différences de réussite entre élèves à l’école élémentaire a déjà mobilisé de nombreuses recherches dans le champ de l’éducation. Dans le cadre de cette thèse, nous explorons le développement chez l’élève de six compétences psychosociales (OMS, 1994) : la coopération, l’empathie, la maîtrise de soi, l’anxiété, l’estime de soi et l’internalité. Eu égard à la prégnance de l’effet des pratiques enseignantes sur le parcours scolaire de l’élève (Bressoux, 1994, 2001 ; Hanushek, 2002, 2014), nous avons fait l’hypothèse que (1) le profil interactionnel des enseignants du premier degré avait un lien avec le niveau de développement des compétences psychosociales et que (2) le niveau de développement des compétences psychosociales en lien avec le profil des enseignants avait un effet sur la réussite scolaire des élèves de l’école élémentaire. Les compétences psychosociales étaient donc envisagées comme de potentielles variables médiatrices entre les pratiques de l’enseignant et les performances des élèves. Fondé sur un échantillon constitué de 623 élèves de CE2, CM1 et CM2 et de 26 enseignants, notre protocole de recherche a permis de recueillir (1) des données sur le profil interactionnel des enseignants à partir de la perception des élèves et des enseignants eux-mêmes, (2) des données en début et en fin d’année sur les compétences psychosociales des élèves et (3) des données sur les performances des élèves en français et en mathématiques. Si nous constatons un effet moindre du profil interactionnel de l’enseignant sur le niveau scolaire des élèves, nous notons un effet direct de ce même profil sur les compétences psychosociales des élèves et un effet de ces compétences sur la réussite des élèves. L’utilisation d’analyses de structure de covariance avec LISREL a mis en évidence un effet indirect d’une forme de bienveillance de l’enseignant sur les performances des élèves qui transiteraient par le bien-être psychosocial scolaire des élèves.
... For some, authority could refer to glamorous leadership rooted in a leader's charisma and acclamation. For others, it might be a synonym for domination and manipulation exercised by power holders to obtain involuntary obedience from those less powerful ones (Alderman & Green, 2011;Harjunen, 2009;Uitto & Syrja La, 2011). Despite its elusiveness, controversies and complexities, a growing body of theoretical and empirical research has convincingly demonstrated that teacher authority is an ever-present feature of everyday school life, determining the quality of students' schooling experiences (Koutrouba, Baxevanou, &Koutroumpas, 2012;Pellegrino, 2010;Richmond & McCroskey, 1984;van Manen, 1991). ...
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Despite the fact that teacher authority is an ever-present and fundamental component of everyday school life and classroom experiences, teacher authority remains poorly understood and insufficiently researched. By reviewing the sociological and educational literature on teacher authority, the study outlined the current status of teacher authority research, explicated the institutional and personal sources of legitimate teacher authority, and delineated four perspectives for understanding teacher authority: a) teacher authority is legitimate domination generated and justified by professional and personal sources of legitimacy; b) teacher authority functions through pedagogical discourse which is a both instructional and regulative process of transmitting value-laden knowledge; c) teacher authority is in dynamic teacher-student relationships where teachers cannot automatically possess but have to earn students’ respect; d) teacher authority emits educational influences and essentially serves the moral order of conscience. The study calls for more research into teacher authority especially against the backdrop of declining teacher authority yet ever growing expectations and demands on teachers and teaching outcomes.
... According to this, maintaining strong teacherstudent relationships is important, which requires teachers and students to mutually interact (Yücel et al., 2010). From the teachers' perspective, teachers should consider students' perspectives and negotiate with them, instead of holding absolute authority, to achieve educational goals and protect the proactive personality of students (Alderman and Green, 2011). From the students' perspective, students could share their personal experiences, such as interesting family stories, with teachers to strengthen the relationship (Baker et al., 2008). ...
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A proactive personality provides students with strong competitiveness in academic learning. However, previous research primarily focused on the effects of the big five facets, and less attention was paid to proactive personality which shows more incremental validity in learning. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between proactive personality and academic engagement. The sample consisted of 519 students (245 females, 274 males; M age = 10.20, SD = 0.891). The study used Mplus 7.0 software to establish structural equation models (SEM). The results showed a significant positive relationship between proactive personality and academic engagement. Teacher-student relationships and academic self-efficacy were found to fully mediate separately between proactive personality and academic engagement. Moreover, the serial mediator model indicated that proactive personality was sequentially related to academic engagement through teacher-student relationships and academic self-efficacy. The implications for learning and teaching are discussed.
... This produces personal dissatisfaction, inefficiency in achieving educational objectives, rebelliousness, and indiscipline. Alderman and Green [35] even allude to low-quality relationships between teachers and students as the source of these behavioural problems in the classroom. The teacher is primarily responsible for maintaining control during the class and for detecting and channelling the most common inappropriate behaviours. ...
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... On the other hand, it is known that many teachers recognize their students individually and act needs-oriented (Sahin & Ozbay, 1999). Effective communication is an undeniable fact of increasing the efficiency of students in classroom settings (Alderman & Green, 2011). In the light of these considerations, to enable teachers to develop effective and fast strategies in the classroom management, which has become more complicated in the present day, activities should be carried out for pre-service teachers based on today's knowledge and research results. ...
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Teaching responsible behavior: Developmental therapy-developmental teaching for troubled children and adolescents
  • M Wood
  • C Quirk
  • F Swindle
Wood, M., Quirk, C., & Swindle, F. (2007). Teaching responsible behavior: Developmental therapy-developmental teaching for troubled children and adolescents (4th ed.) Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.