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... Les études populationnelles menées auprès des jeunes indiquent qu'entre 1,7 % et 8 % d'entre eux rencontrent les critères de jeu pathologique et qu'entre 4 % et 14 % sont à risque de développer des problèmes de jeu (Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission, 2002 ;Derevensky & Gupta, 1998 ;Gupta & Derevensky, 1998a, 1998bHuang & Boyer, 2007 ;Ladouceur, 1994Ladouceur, , 1996Mackay et al., 2005 ;Martin et al., 2009 ;Shaffer & Hall, 1996, 2001Welte et al., 2008). Il est à noter qu'au cours des dernières années, le domaine des JHA chez les jeunes a été l'hôte de plusieurs débats concernant tant les critères permettant d'évaluer la présence de problème de jeu que les questionnaires utilisés pour faire cette évaluation (Derevensky & Gupta, 2000 ;Jacques & Ladouceur, 2003 ;Ladouceur, Bouchard, et al., 2000 ;. ...
... : DSM-IV-J) (Fisher, 2000) pourraient être privilégiés. Selon les données actuellement disponibles, ceux-ci comptent pour 4 % à 14 % des jeunes de la population générale (Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission, 2002 ;Derevensky & Gupta, 1998 ;Gupta & Derevensky, 1998b ;Huang & Boyer, 2007 ;Ladouceur, 1994Ladouceur, , 1996Mackay et al., 2005 ;Martin et al., 2009 ;Shaffer & Hall, 1996, 2001Welte, Barnes, Tidwell, & Hoffman, 2009). ...
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La litterature concernant les jeux de hasard et d’argent ainsi que la presence de problemes de jeu chez les jeunes indique que 80 % des moins de 18 ans ont joue au moins une fois a un jeu de hasard et d’argent au cours de leur vie. Bien que la plupart de ces jeunes joueurs ne developperont pas de probleme de jeu au cours de leur adolescence ou de leur vie adulte, certains developperont un tel probleme. Il est donc important d’informer les jeunes concernant la pratique des jeux de hasard et d’argent afin de prevenir le developpement d’eventuels problemes et de s’assurer que le jeu demeure un jeu. Les informations transmises peuvent etre incluses dans des activites de prevention visant a demystifier les pensees erronees qui pourraient se developper en jouant, a mieux connaitre les consequences liees au jeu excessif de meme que ce qu’il convient de faire lors de l’apparition d’une participation plus intense au jeu, les ressources d’aide disponibles, etc. Comme l’ensemble de ces informations de meme que plusieurs autres peuvent etre incluses dans un programme de prevention s’adressant aux jeunes, il est important que le contenu de l’intervention soit adapte a la clientele ciblee par celle-ci. Cet article presente trois approches preventives (universelle, selective, indiquee) et donne aussi des exemples de programmes de prevention du jeu s’etant averes efficaces aupres des jeunes. L’article souligne, de plus, l’importance d’evaluer l’efficacite de ces mesures preventives pour garantir leur impact positif sur les comportements de jeu des jeunes.
... Adolescents appear particularly vulnerable to the appeal of internet gambling as they find gambling enjoyable & are particularly attracted to the colourful, fast-paced videogame-like qualities, view themselves as highly intelligent, and perceive themselves as invulnerable to a gambling problem. It is seen that internet gambling is associated with emotional distress, even among non-regular Internet gamblers & more substantial involvement has an additive and independent effect on poor physical and emotional health (Petry, 2006) as the youth for engage in gambling are for entertainment, excitement and the possibility of winning money (Derevensky & Gupta, 1998). Derevensky & Gupta (1998) have proposed a few public health goals to address problem gambling. ...
... It is seen that internet gambling is associated with emotional distress, even among non-regular Internet gamblers & more substantial involvement has an additive and independent effect on poor physical and emotional health (Petry, 2006) as the youth for engage in gambling are for entertainment, excitement and the possibility of winning money (Derevensky & Gupta, 1998). Derevensky & Gupta (1998) have proposed a few public health goals to address problem gambling. Denormalization, within the context of youth gambling, which implies social denormalization, where society begins to question and assess underage gambling. ...
Chapter
The internet is an essential and integral part of our lives, whether it's about looking for a meaning of a word, searching for a journal, shopping, or connecting to others. Human beings cannot think of life without the internet. Although it's having a positive impact, the negative side is there. Problematic internet use is defined as non-chemical or behavioral addictions, which involve human-machine interactions and can be harmful as it leads to numerous forms of psychological disorders. The chapter addresses various psychopathologies arising due to excessive internet use (e.g., problematic internet use, online gaming, online gambling, and compulsive cybersex). The chapter frames a strong theoretical background along with recent controversial issues related to the disorder. The chapter is delineated to acquaint readers with new concepts arising in clinical psychology that will help mental health professionals to be well equipped with skills required for the prevention and treatment of internet-related psychological disorders.
... Фазе у развоју болести зависности од коцкања су: 6 1. Фаза добитка -присутно је узбуђење, тражење акције, финансијски добици поткрепљују коцкање, породица подржава коцкање, прихвата поклоне купљене од новца добијеног на коцки и тиме прави прву велику грешку…; 2. Фаза губитка -коцкар крије своју активност, јури губитак, повећава улоге, позајмљује новац, исцрпљује све легалне изворе, запоставља породицу, пријатеље, школу, посао, окреће се породици за додатне финансије, што породица често прихвата и враћа дугове и тиме прави још једну велику грешку…; 3. Фаза очаја -присутни су отуђеност од породице и окружења, структура личности се мења, прибегава се криминогеном понашању, појављују се суицидне мисли, сви извори прихода су потрошени, породица се коначно суочава са огромним проблемом. ...
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In most cultures around the world, gambling is socially acceptable and legal activity for fun. Today are available various types of gambling activities, national lottery, scratchcards, internet gambling, casino games, sports betting, bingo, slot machines, a private betting, etc. While the vast majority of gambling and recreational activities without adverse consequences, the minority this habit progresses to pathological gambling, turning into an obsessive compulsive disorder, which negatively affects the individual, family and society. This disorder is associated with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, abuse of alcohol, drugs and other psychoactive substances. To finance their unhealthy habit pathological gamblers often resort to criminal activities, from petty crimes to violent crimes. Pathological gambling is a serious health problem, but the early identification, prevention and appropriate professional treatment can limit and mitigate long-term adverse effects and improve the outcome for addicts and their environment. Key words: gambling, addiction, pathological gambling, typology of gambling, crime prevention
... Adolescents appear particularly vulnerable to the appeal of Internet gambling as they find gambling enjoyment (Dickson et al, in press), are particularly attracted to the colorful, fast-paced video game-like qualities, view themselves as highly intelligent, and perceive themselves as invulnerable to a gambling problem. It is seen that Internet gambling is associated with emotional distress, even among non-regular Internet gamblers & more substantial involvement has an additive and independent effect on poor physical and emotional health (Petry, 2006) as the youth from engaging in gambling are for entertainment, excitement and the possibility of winning money (Derevensky& Gupta, 1998). ...
Chapter
In the era of digital technology, the internet has its significant role in sprouting vulnerability toward the different form of addictions and psychiatric disorders as well as providing the platform to manage them effectively. The internet provides ready access to illicit drugs, nonprescription medications which facilitate a sale of controlled substances over the Internet without a valid prescription which contributed to the rise of several forms of addictions. Studies have linked the severity of Problematic Internet Use to increase chances of substance Use disorder. Utilization of internet for longer durations serves as a booster for behavioral addictions like online gambling. Web based interventions on the positive side provides a cost effective, readily accessible and user-friendly platform to reach out majority of patients to help them in seeking treatment of Addictions and various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the contribution of the internet in a positive and negative way to develop as well as resolve Psychiatric disorder.
... Although problematic gambling affects only a small minority of individuals, the negative consequences are usually widespread with serious psychological, social, and economic implications not only for the individual gambler, but also bearing severe personal and economic costs for family members and the wider community and society (e.g., Derevensky et al. 2004;Ellenbogen et al. 2007;Lesieur 1998;Shaffer and Korn 2002). In adolescents, problematic gambling has been shown to result in increased delinquency and crime, the disruption of relationships with family and peers, and the impairment of academic performance and work activities (Derevensky and Gupta 1998). Furthermore, if left unchecked, frequent gambling in adolescence may develop into problematic gambling in adulthood (Carlson and Moore 1998). ...
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Understanding risk factors of problematic gambling is prerequisite to effective intervention design to alleviate the negative consequences of gambling. This study explored the personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling in four high schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, among students (N = 422) ranging from 12 to 21 years of age. Results from the cross-sectional survey showed that personal feelings (e.g., self-esteem, false perceptions about winning, drug abuse), social factors (e.g., peer influence, parental gambling), and environmental factors (e.g., accessibility of gambling venues, advertisements) were significant correlates of problematic gambling. The study also revealed that men were more at risk for severe problematic gambling than females. Among the identified types of gambling activities, the most prevalent ones were playing cards followed by flipping coin and pool gambling while internet gambling was among the least reported gambling activities. By identifying personal, social and environmental correlates of risky gambling activities this study provides evidence-based information for the systematic design and evaluation of educational interventions to prevent problematic gambling in young people.
... Although problematic gambling affects only a small minority of individuals, the negative consequences are usually widespread with serious psychological, social, and economic implications not only for the individual gambler, but also bearing severe personal and economic costs for family members and the wider community and society (e.g., Derevensky et al. 2004;Ellenbogen et al. 2007;Lesieur 1998;Shaffer and Korn 2002). In adolescents, problematic gambling has been shown to result in increased delinquency and crime, the disruption of relationships with family and peers, and the impairment of academic performance and work activities (Derevensky and Gupta 1998). Furthermore, if left unchecked, frequent gambling in adolescence may develop into problematic gambling in adulthood (Carlson and Moore 1998). ...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding risk factors of problematic gambling is prerequisite to effective intervention design to alleviate the negative consequences of gambling. This study explored the personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling in four high schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, among students (N = 422) ranging from 12 to 21 years of age. Results from the cross-sectional survey showed that personal feelings (e.g., self-esteem, false perceptions about winning, drug abuse), social factors (e.g., peer influence, parental gambling), and environmental factors (e.g., accessibility of gambling venues, advertisements) were significant correlates of problematic gambling. The study also revealed that men were more at risk for severe problematic gambling than females. Among the identified types of gambling activities, the most prevalent ones were playing cards followed by flipping coin and pool gambling while internet gambling was among the least reported gambling activities. By identifying personal, social and environmental correlates of risky gambling activities this study provides evidence-based information for the systematic design and evaluation of educational interventions to prevent problematic gambling in young people.
Chapter
In the era of digital technology, the internet has its significant role in sprouting vulnerability toward the different form of addictions and psychiatric disorders as well as providing the platform to manage them effectively. The internet provides ready access to illicit drugs, nonprescription medications which facilitate a sale of controlled substances over the Internet without a valid prescription which contributed to the rise of several forms of addictions. Studies have linked the severity of Problematic Internet Use to increase chances of substance Use disorder. Utilization of internet for longer durations serves as a booster for behavioral addictions like online gambling. Web based interventions on the positive side provides a cost effective, readily accessible and user-friendly platform to reach out majority of patients to help them in seeking treatment of Addictions and various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the contribution of the internet in a positive and negative way to develop as well as resolve Psychiatric disorder.
Article
Full-text available
Gambling is typically thought of as an enjoyable adult activity with few negative consequences. Yet, there is a growing body of international research suggesting that youth view gambling as both an enjoyable and exciting form of entertainment. While most youth gamble for money in a responsible manner, establishing and maintaining both time and money limits, an identifiable proportion of these youth get over-involved and experience serious negative gambling-related consequences. Unlike other potentially adolescent risky behaviors, very few prevention programs are available to help raise awareness about this potential problem. The case is made that this is an important social policy issue which needs to be addressed, by parents, educators and legislators.
Article
The aim of this study is to examine the associations between problem behavior and gambling frequency among eighth- and ninth-grade boys and girls (N = 101,167). Data were obtained from the cross-sectional School Health Promotion Study. Outcome measures were adolescents’ truancy, bullying, delinquency, and substance use. Polychotomous logistic regression analyses were used to study the relationship between gambling frequency and risk behaviors in a total sample, as well as separately for boys and girls. In 2010, 62% of the adolescents had gambled during the previous year, and in 2011, 61% of the adolescents had done so. Engaging in different levels of truancy, bullying, delinquency, and substance abuse were associated with higher risks for frequent gambling. Similar patterns of associations were found among boys and girls. Adolescents who engaged in gambling on a daily or weekly basis were the most vulnerable group for problem behavior. However, even infrequent gambling was associated with different problem behaviors. © 2015, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. All rights reserved.
Article
This paper summarises the results of a cross-sectional study of 926 young people (years 7–12, age 11–19) attending State, independent and Catholic schools in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence of gambling and problem gambling among ACT adolescents and to obtain insights into the social context in which gambling was occurring. Survey results showed that 70% of adolescents had gambled in the previous 12 months and 10% at least weekly. Approximately 4% of adolescents could be described as problem gamblers based upon the DSM-IV-J classification with males and young people from indigenous backgrounds found to be more significantly affected. Most adolescent gambling in the ACT was undertaken either privately or conjunction with others (usually parents or peers), suggesting that existing regulatory provisions are working well. However, the paper nonetheless suggests the need for tighter controls over access to lottery products, greater consumer information in schools to educate young people about the risks of gambling, as well as additional ethnographic research to obtain further insights into how young people gain access to gambling opportunities.
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