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Modeling Probability of Path Loss for DSDV, OLSR and DYMO above 802.11 and 802.11p

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... Others present the path loss model and comparison for DSDV and OLSR above 802.11 and 802.11p [13]. ...
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Performance Evaluation of Ad Hoc Routing Protocols For Vechicular Ad Hoc Networks" Thesis Presented to
  • Imran Khan
Imran Khan, A "Performance Evaluation of Ad Hoc Routing Protocols For Vechicular Ad Hoc Networks" Thesis Presented to Mohammad Ali Jinnah University Fall, 2009.
Using multiple metrics with the optimized link state routing protocol for wireless mesh networks
  • W Moreira
  • E Aguiar
  • A Abelm
  • M Stanton
Moreira, W., Aguiar, E., Abelm, A., Stanton, M., "Using multiple metrics with the optimized link state routing protocol for wireless mesh networks", Simpsio Brasileiro de Redes de Computadorese Sistemas Distribudos, Maio (2008).