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Four degrees and beyond: the potential for a global temperature increase of four degrees and its implications (vol 369, pg 6, 2011)

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[ Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 369, 6–19 (13 January 2011) (doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0303)][1] The name of the third author should be ‘Heike Schroeder’. The corrected author list is therefore: By Mark New, Diana Liverman, Heike Schroeder and Kevin Anderson [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1098/rsta.2010.0303
Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2011) 369, 1112
doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0351
CORRECTION
Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 369, 6–19 (13 January 2011) (doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0303)
Correction for New et al., Introduction. Four
degrees and beyond: the potential for a global
temperature increase of four degrees
and its implications
BYMARK NEW,DIANA LIVERMAN,HEIKE SCHROEDER AND KEVIN ANDERSON
The name of the third author should be ‘Heike Schroeder’. The corrected author
list is therefore:
BYMARK NEW,DIANA LIVERMAN,HEIKE SCHROEDER AND KEVIN ANDERSON
This journal is ©2011 The Royal Society
1112
on September 2, 2017http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/Downloaded from
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