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Single Childfree Adults: The Work-Life Stress of an Unexpected Group.

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... In fact, single workers without children may deal with their own unique work-life issues (Casper & Swanberg, 2009 ) . For instance, singles may be expected to take on additional work responsibilities when employees with a spouse and/or children need time away from work since their nonwork roles are perceived as unimportant ( Bradley, 2006 ;Scott, 2001 ;Wilson, 2004 ) . ...
... Recent studies have included single workers in the work-life literature (Casper & Roberto, in press ;Casper & Swanberg, 2009 ;Casper, Weltman, & Kwesiga, 2007 ;Hamilton, Gordon, & Whelan-Berry, 2006 ;Young, 1996Young, , 1999 . For instance, Hamilton et al. ( 2006 ) found that nevermarried women without children reported signi fi cant work-to-life con fl ict, at a level similar to that of married women both with and without children (i.e., single women reported 11.62, married women without children reported 12.00, married women with children reported 11.62). ...
... These single women also felt that many bene fi ts offered by their organizations were geared toward the needs of workers with a spouse and children rather than single workers. Casper and Swanberg ( 2009 ) analyzed data from 37 singles without children who were interviewed about their work-life concerns and found 62% felt they were treated differently from coworkers with a spouse and children, and 30% described different work expectations for single and married workers. Examples of different expectations included requirements for longer hours, undesirable hours (working holidays), additional work assignments, and more business travel. ...
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This chapter discusses the ethical concerns surrounding providing support for employees’ family demands in a way that is inclusive and does not exclude workers who are single and/or do not have children. Empirical research and public policy issues are discussed which demonstrate ways in which singles workers are perceived poorly or disadvantaged in society. Research on the work-life issues that single workers face is discussed and recommendations are provided for creating a singles-friendly work culture in which the work-life needs of singles without children are supported by the organization, just as work–family needs are supported for employees with spouses and children.
... However, the workplace implications of such positive stereotypes for singles can be anything but positive. Organisations may expect singles to undertake undesirable work or endure disagreeable work conditions including late night work, frequent business travel and additional tasks to fill in for co-workers with childcare needs (Casper & Swanberg, 2009;Casper et al., 2007). Although singles experience work-to-life conflict on par with non-singles (Casper et al., 2016;Mordi, Simpson, Singh, & Okafor, 2010;Sidani & Al Hakim, 2012), organisations are often less sympathetic to the non-work obligations of their single employees (Casper & Swanberg, 2009). ...
... Organisations may expect singles to undertake undesirable work or endure disagreeable work conditions including late night work, frequent business travel and additional tasks to fill in for co-workers with childcare needs (Casper & Swanberg, 2009;Casper et al., 2007). Although singles experience work-to-life conflict on par with non-singles (Casper et al., 2016;Mordi, Simpson, Singh, & Okafor, 2010;Sidani & Al Hakim, 2012), organisations are often less sympathetic to the non-work obligations of their single employees (Casper & Swanberg, 2009). In summary, the outlook for single employees is not positive. ...
... For example, relocation with or without the family is a significant stressor and can have profound effects on family members, and therefore, turnover decisions. Researchers (Casper & Swanberg, 2009) have also suggested that work–life stressors can have negative effects on single employees without children, suggesting that research should examine how work–life conflict affects turnover decisions of single employees. Studies might also examine how spouse support and WIF relate to other forms of work withdrawal behaviors (e.g., absenteeism, tardiness, and lowered effort; Hulin, 1991). ...
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