Article

Studies of the blood-brain barrier: Preliminary findings and discussion

Authors:
  • Randomline, Inc
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Abstract

The tasks I have been assigned as a discussant are, first, to discuss results of my current experimentation that extends my earlier blood-brain barrier work as it bears upon the work presented by the panelists. Second, I am to comment on the work presented by the various panelists. I will briefly sketch three of my current experiments. One concerns the effect of microwave energy on the blood-vitreous barrier of the eye. Another is concerned with the possibility of passage of dye through the placental barrier to the fetus. The third is concerned with the possibility of low-intensity microwave energy enhancing the passage of cancer chemotherapeutic substances through the blood-brain barrier.

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... In general, the effects of nonionizing radiation have been divided into thermal and nonthermal and have been extensively investigated through cell and animal studies (10)(11)(12)(13), neurological studies (14,15), thermographic measurements (16), computer model-based simulations (17,18), metabolic human studies (19), and large epidemiological data (20). Among those, researchers have focused on a possible link between cell phone radiation and cancer (21). ...
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