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Culturally Congruent Teaching Strategies: Voices from the Field

Article

Culturally Congruent Teaching Strategies: Voices from the Field

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Abstract

This article describes a year-long qualitative study to discover, first, the preferred teaching strategies of Hawaiian language immersion and culture-based (HLCB) educators and, second, how the strate- gies were being implemented in HLCB classrooms. Interviews and focus group discussions with 40 HLCB educators yielded a set of 10 teaching practices viewed as culturally appropriate, as healing, and as increasing academic self-efficacy. Although these teaching practices are directly related to important Hawaiian values, beliefs about teaching and learning, and worldview, participants noted a lack of available training and support to implement them. Outcomes suggest that training in culturally congruent teaching strategies should be ongoing and systematic and that incorporating place-based curricula in public school settings could possibly increase the academic self-efficacy of Hawaiian students.

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... Evidence provided by empirical research and case studies reveal that culturally responsive teaching, linked to informed instruction and tailored to individual school settings and populations, can be successful in raising academic outcome levels, improving attendance rates, and self-efficacy of Indigenous and other minority school children (Au & Jordon, 1981;Au & Kawakami, 1991;Bell et al., 2004;Castagno & Brayboy, 2008, p. 958;Demmert & Towner, 2003;Vogt, et al., 1987;Tharp & Dalton, 2007). Greater success can be realized by establishing cultural congruence within educational settings, and by being responsive to the educational needs of Indigenous students (Pewewardy, 1998;Schonleber, 2007;. The following discussion provides evidence to support these claims. ...
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Schonleber is an associate professor of education at Chaminade University of Honolulu. An educational psychologist with a Montessori specialty, she has an interest in indigenous pedagogy, the impact of teaching practices and culture on learning, and alternative assessment
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Nanette S. Schonleber is an associate professor of education at Chaminade University of Honolulu. An educational psychologist with a Montessori specialty, she has an interest in indigenous pedagogy, the impact of teaching practices and culture on learning, and alternative assessment. SUB O'ahu 9–12
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Not Hawaiian PH: Part Hawaiian H: Hawaiian PR: Private School CH: New Century Charter School PU: Hawaiian Immersion Public School PRE: Preschool KIND: Kindergarten IN/TOD: Infants and Toddlers R: Rural URB: Urban SUB: Suburban CB: Culture-Based English Medium DI: Dual Hawaiian
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Key to abbreviations NH: Not Hawaiian PH: Part Hawaiian H: Hawaiian PR: Private School CH: New Century Charter School PU: Hawaiian Immersion Public School PRE: Preschool KIND: Kindergarten IN/TOD: Infants and Toddlers R: Rural URB: Urban SUB: Suburban CB: Culture-Based English Medium DI: Dual Hawaiian/English Immersion HI: Hawaiian Immersion
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