ArticlePDF Available

The Victims’ View : Domestic Violence and Police Response

Authors:
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Intervention in all three communities resulted in statistically significant changes in police and court responses, including an increase in arrests and the use of mandated counseling. Similar positive results have been reported by Caputo (1988), Edleson and Grusznski (1988), Edleson and Syers (1991), Kramer and Black (1998), and Shepard (1992). Although Buzawa and Buzawa (2001, p. 229) acknowledge that such programs can 'dramatically affect the cycle of abuse,' they note that the research suggests 'there is a core group of abusers that are not, and apparently will not, be deterred' (see also Gondolf, 2000). ...
Article
Full-text available
Conventional wisdom about the appropriate police response to domestic violence has changed dramatically in recent years, characterized by an increasing move toward mandatory arrest. This paper examines an effort by the Vacaville, California Police Department to provide a more comprehensive response to domestic violence, through an innovative law enforcement, clinical, and prosecutorial partnership (called FIRST). The paper employs interrupted time series analysis (ARIMA) with monthly domestic violence arrest data from 1990 to 2000 to investigate the impact of the program. ARIMA results are considered in the context of more general crime trends. Results suggest that the onset of the program coincided with an initial increase in arrests, followed by a longer‐term decrease. Although other potential explanations could not be eliminated, findings indicate that the FIRST program played a contributing role in the reduction of domestic violence in Vacaville.
Article
Isolation is an important factor in marital abuse among South Asian immigrant families. It lends itself to the invisibility immigrant women experience based on their ethno-gender status in the United States. Drawn from unstructured interviews with abused South Asian immigrant women, three different levels of isolation are explained. The first level involves the quality of a woman''s relationship with her spouse; the second is related to the frequency and quality of social interaction with friends, relatives, and coworkers; and the third is explained in terms of the level of access to and participation in the ethnic community and other formal institutions.
Article
Full-text available
conducted an experiment from early 1981 to mid-1982 testing police responses to domestic violence. A technical report of the experiment can be found in the April 1984 issue of the American Sociological Review. This report summarizes the results and implications of the experiment. It also shows how the experiment was designed and conducted so the reader may understand and judge the findings. Findings in Brief The Minneapolis domestic violence experiment was the first scientifically controlled test of the effects of arrest for any crime. It found that arrest was the most effective of three standard methods police use to reduce domestic violence. The other police methods— attempting to counsel both
Book
Rev.& expanded from Case study research in education,1988.Incl.bibliographical references,index
Article
Despite the significance of racial profiling as an issue of national concern, little empirical research exists on whether police traffic stop practices disproportionately impact minority drivers. Using data from 2,673 traffic stops conducted by the Richmond, Virginia, Police Department in 2000, this article explores the treatment by police of motorists of different races and ethnic backgrounds. Minority citizens in general, and African Americans in particular, were disproportionately stopped compared with their percentage in the driving-eligible population. However, they were searched no more frequently than Whites; in fact, Whites were significantly more likely than minorities to be the subjects of consent searches. Compared with Whites, and after controlling for variables, minority drivers were more likely to be warned, whereas Whites were more likely to be ticketed or arrested. Examining officer race as a predictor revealed White officers were no more likely than minority officers to stop, search, or arrest minority drivers.
Chapter
Any discussion of possible goals in the teaching of ethics must begin by facing a number of formidable difficulties. The very phrase “the teaching of ethics” has a variety of connotations in our culture, and so for that matter does the term “ethics.” One can never be certain just what people hear when they encounter the notion of “teaching ethics”: for some, it means instructing people not to break the law, or to abide by some legal or professional code; for others, it means an attempt to improve moral character or to instill certain virtues; for still others, it primarily means imparting special skills in the handling of moral argumentation. Moreover, clarity is by no means guaranteed by the standard method of simply stipulating one’s own definitions or viewpoints. Someone who was once “taught ethics” by harsh and repressive methods of gross indoctrination may have trouble understanding “the teaching of ethics” in any more benign sense, however carefully one may point out other possibilities.