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What is a Good Digital Library in Undeveloped Regions

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Abstract

Information and communication technologies are considered as a potential catalyst for socioeconomic development in undeveloped regions. It is present the criteria for a good digital library in undeveloped regions, and we describe the XSL-CDL framework developed to construct digital libraries from a pool of Web services-based components. We have proposed a model of a digital library for undeveloped regions that is comprised of a number of quality indicators for key formal DL concepts. It helps designers of DL to identify constraints, to ensure adequate quality, to monitor system behavior, to facilitate evaluation, and to set priorities.

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