Article

Investigation of Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth (SIFO) and/or Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) in Chronic, Unexplained Gastrointestinal Symptoms

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Abstract

Background Whether intestinal dysmotility and the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) either independently or together contributes to small intestinal bacterial over-growth (SIBO), and/or small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) is not known.

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