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ChemInform Abstract: Designing Ionophores and Molecular Nanotubes Based on Molecular Recognition

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ChemInform Abstract: Designing Ionophores and Molecular Nanotubes Based on Molecular Recognition

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The strong electronegativity of O dictates that the ground state of singlet CO has positively charged C and negatively charged O, in agreement with ab initio charge analysis, but in disagreement with the dipole direction. Though this unusual phenomenon has been fairly studied, the study of electrostatic potential (EP) for noncovalent interactions of CO is essential for better understanding. Here we illustrate that both C and O atom-ends show negative EP (where the C end gives more negative EP), favoring positively charged species, whereas the cylindrical surface of the CO bond shows positive EP, favoring negatively charged ones. This is demonstrated from the interactions of CO with Na+, Cl-, H2O, CO and benzene. It can be explained by the quadrupole driven electrostatic nature of CO (like N2) with very weak dipole moment. The EP is properly described by the tripole model taking into account the electrostatic multipole moments, which has a large negative charge at a certain distance protruded from C, a large positive charge on C, and a small negative charge on O. We also discuss the EP of the first excited triplet CO.
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