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Effect of greenhouse polyethelene covering on activity level and photo-response of bumble bees

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We conducted laboratory experiments assessing the relationship between commercial greenhouse polyethylene coverings and bumble bee, Bombus impatiens Cresson (Hymenoptera: Apidae), activity and loss from ventilation systems. Bee activity was measured in four small greenhouses, each with a different polyethylene covering. Bee activity was quantified using photodiode tunnels mounted in the hive entrances. Contrary to commercial greenhouse experiments, there was no difference in bee activity based on covering type. There was a positive linear relationship between temperature in the experimental greenhouses and bee activity. The potential for bee loss through open ventilation systems for five covering types was quantified using a Y-maze decision box. Bees were more attracted to direct light than to light transmitted through ultraviolet (UV) blocking coverings, whereas bees were equally attracted to direct light as they were to UV-transmitting coverings. These experiments suggest that greenhouses with UV-transmitting plastics may result in less bee loss through ventilation systems.
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... No entanto, outros polinizadores têm sido identificados, incluindo espécies de abelhas nativas das regiões onde a cultura é plantada (Ali et al., 2011;Jauker et al., 2011;Morandin & Winston, 2005). Um estudo realizado no Paquistão demostrou que polinizadores nativos (por exemplo, Halictus sp.) podem ser mais eficientes na polinização da variedade de canola cultivada na região, pois obtiveram maiores taxas de produção de grãos que a A. mellifera (Ali et al., 2011). ...
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