Article

Videolaparoscopia no diagnóstico e tratamento da síndrome do ovário remanescente em uma gata

Ciência Rural (Impact Factor: 0.38). 01/2009; 39(8). DOI: 10.1590/S0103-84782009005000179

ABSTRACT

A síndrome do ovário remanescente é definida como a persistência da atividade ovariana em fêmeas castradas. É decorrente da presença de tecido ovariano acessório no ligamento largo uterino ou por erro na técnica cirúrgica de ovariosalpingohisterectomia ou ovariectomia. O presente trabalho descreve o diagnóstico e tratamento videolaparoscópico de um caso de síndrome de ovário remanescente em uma gata. No acesso, foram utilizados três portais de 5mm nas paredes abdominais direita, esquerda e na linha média ventral. Constatou-se a presença de massa com aspecto de tecido ovariano junto à fossa paralombar esquerda e aumento de volume na fossa paralombar direita, removidos com tesoura de Metzenbaum e cauterização monopolar. O exame histológico da massa extirpada do lado esquerdo confirmou a presença de tecido ovariano. Não se observaram complicações perioperatórias, e a paciente evoluiu sem sinais de recidiva de estro pelo período de pelo menos 24 meses. Conclui-se que a síndrome do ovário remanescente em gatas pode ser diagnosticada e tratada com sucesso por cirurgia laparoscópica.

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Available from: João Pedro Scussel Feranti, Nov 10, 2015
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    • "A falha em remover todo o ovário pode resultar da colocação inadequada das pinças hemostáticas, ligaduras ou da reduzida visualização do campo cirúrgico (Santos et al., 2009). Atualmente, alguns centros de excelência têm utilizado o procedimento cirúrgico de videolaparoscopia em gatas e cadelas portadoras de ovário residual, com obtenção de bons resultados (Finger et al., 2009; Luz et al., 2009). "

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