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Abstract

This article develops a model and typology of government-nongovernmental organization (NGO) relationships to enable both a rapid appraisal of government-NGO relationships in a particular context and to identify the characteristics and possible structure of alternative relationship types. Building on the literature on the subject, the model defines eight possible relationship types based on several dimensions: government's resistance or acceptance of institutional pluralism, the relative balance of power in the relationship, and the degree of formality and - by extension - the level of government linkage. The model and typology are designed to assist governments, NGOs, donors, and other development practitioners to identify and promote the most productive government-NGO relationship for a particular context.
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Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector
http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/27/3/358
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DOI: 10.1177/0899764098273006
1998 27: 358Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly
Jennifer M. Coston
A Model and Typology of Government-NGO Relationships
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... This study posits Hogue (1993) to explain collaborative partnerships: they require a system that unites members, communication routines, mutual trust, and consensus for all decision making. Ideally, partnership building provides a comparative advantage for each party involved in the partnership or cooperation (Coston, 1998;Xu et al., 2018;Yongdong & Jianxing, 2017). Local governments have agendas to build partnerships with external parties. ...
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