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Abstract

In these turbulent times, we propose the importance of developing the psychological capital dimension of resiliency. After providing the theoretical background and meaning of psychological capital in general and resiliency in particular, the authors present proactive and reactive human resource development (HRD) strategies for its development. The proactive HRD includes increasing psychological assets, decreasing risk factors, and facilitating processes that allow human resources to enhance their resilience. The reactive HRD largely draws from a broaden-and-build model of positive emotions and self-enhancement, external attribution, and hardiness. The article includes specific guidelines for HRD applications and an agenda for future needed research.
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Developing the Psychological Capital of Resiliency
Fred Luthans; Gretchen R Vogelgesang; Paul B Lester
Human Resource Development Review; Mar 2006; 5, 1; ABI/INFORM Global
pg. 25
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... Therefore, both cognitive and emotion-behavioral responses should be considered when considering the influence of emotional on individual behaviors. Resilience refers to the ability to quickly recover from a stressful situation and adapt flexibly to changes in the situation (Luthans et al., 2006), is a typical variable of individual emotional processing. Employees with higher levels of resilience were more adaptable to environmental changes, and they could quickly overcome the distress caused by negative emotions and develop themselves, thus achieving better success (Campbell-Sills & Stein, 2010;Luthans et al., 2006;Neill et al., 2020). ...
... Resilience refers to the ability to quickly recover from a stressful situation and adapt flexibly to changes in the situation (Luthans et al., 2006), is a typical variable of individual emotional processing. Employees with higher levels of resilience were more adaptable to environmental changes, and they could quickly overcome the distress caused by negative emotions and develop themselves, thus achieving better success (Campbell-Sills & Stein, 2010;Luthans et al., 2006;Neill et al., 2020). Frustration represented an opportunity for them to become stronger, and they were able to cope better even when facing negative emotions. ...
... Employees with a high level of resilience can recover more quickly in the face of negative events and maintain flexible thinking that helps buffer the decline in cognitive ability caused by anger. After experiencing work stress, resilience may help employees regain confidence and maintain a positive attitude (Luthans et al., 2006), which better expands the scope of thinking and contributes to stronger cognitive abilities (Fredrickson & Branigan, 2005). Therefore, by collecting more comprehensive and detailed information about failed projects, employees can think about the causes of failure more broadly and find solutions through more active thinking (Nelson & Sim, 2014). ...
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... Researchers generally agree that resilience is related to positive psychological resource capacities including optimism, hope, and self-efficacy [52,53]. Individuals with optimistic viewpoints, high self-efficacy, and hope are more likely to find solutions to problems, rather than ruminating on the problems and past mistakes or errors [32]. However, this does not mean that the four factors are equally important in managing stress and preventing depression. ...
... However, this does not mean that the four factors are equally important in managing stress and preventing depression. Luthans and colleagues [32] suggest that resilience is the key factor intervening in the pathway between self-efficacy, hope, and optimism, and health outcomes. In other words, these factors might not have an impact on outcomes without resilience. ...
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... This changing nature of work places increased pressure on the individual to be resilient and adaptable to constant changes to the workplace and the demands of their life-work roles (Kotur & Anbazhagan, 2014;Luthans et al., 2006;. Human resources departments and practitioners can assist in developing employee resilience through designing management strategies and initiatives that develop psychological assets, decrease risk factors, and designing human resources processes that enhance employee resilience (Luthans et al., 2006). ...
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