Article

The Effect of Hatha, Pranayama, and Raja yoga on the Feeling of Fatigue of Women Suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

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Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most significant diseases that change people's lives and causes many side effects for the patients. Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported in those who are suffering from MS. This study aims to investigate the effect of Hatha, Pranayama, and Raja yoga techniques on the feeling of fatigue in women suffering from MS. This research is a clinical trialed study, conducted on 60 MS patients in Kohgilooyeh and Boyrahmad province in 2009. The method for collecting data was a questionnaire including the demographical information of the patients as well as the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Patients were randomly divided into two control and study groups, each having 30 members. The fatigue of both groups was assessed before intermediation. The study group was treated with eight 1-1.5-hour sessions per month, for three months while no intermediation was done on the control group. The patients' fatigue was assessed again 12 weeks after beginning yoga techniques and one month after finishing with the techniques. Patients' fatigue was assessing again and compared with one another. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive statistics tests, paired t-test, independent t-test, and variance analysis with repeated measurement. The average age of the samples was 31.6 ± 8 and the range of age was between 18 and 45. Among the people in the samples, 42 people (70%) were married and 18 people (30%) were single. 44 people (73.3%) had high school education, 16people (26.6%) had university education. The majority of them (63.3%) were housewives. Concerning the effect of yoga techniques on the feeling of fatigue in the patients, the results gained from statistical tests indicated that there was not a significant difference in the amount of fatigue in the control group and the study group before the intervention, while this difference became significant after the intervention (p<0.05).Doing yoga techniques decreases the amount of fatigue in the patients suffering from MS who took part in this study. Therefore, due to their low cost, accessibility, and rapid learning of these techniques, teaching and recommending them to MS infected patients could be effective in regard to improving their situation. [Nooryan kh, Najafi sh, Mohebi Nobandegani Z. The Effect of Hatha, Pranayama, and Raja yoga on the Feeling of Fatigue of Women Suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Journal of American Science 2012;8(2):251-254]. Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is among the chronic and disabling diseases that is the cause of many disabilities in the young and old people (1). Based on the conducted estimations, there 2.5 people in the world who are suffering from this disease (2). In recent years, MS has become even more common in the world and in Iran (3). In spite of the different cures for this disease, it is still considered one of the most disabling diseases that affect different aspects of the individuals' life and thus affects the quality of life of the patients (4). MS is one of the most severe diseases in regard to changing people's life (5). It brings about many complications for those infected and fatigue is among the most common of the reported complications (6). More than 90% of those affected with MS, experience fatigue in a way that it inhibits the usual daily activities, performance, and quality of life of the patients (7). In fact, the feeling of fatigue related to MS is an abnormal general lack of energy that significantly limits the physical and mental capability of the patients and decreases the energy and causes an unpleasant feeling, weakness in motion, and problems in concentration (8). Different combined medical and non-medical therapies are usually used in order to treat the fatigue in MS patients. Yoga and aerobics exercises are among the non-medical recommended techniques that are in need of further investigation (9). Yoga means the unity and coordination of body and soul, or in other words the control of thought-waves. Yoga is generally based on three principles of doing subtle postures (hathayoga) breathing exercises or absorbing life force using yoga breathing (pranayama), and concentration and control of the mind through meditation (raja yoga). Doing

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