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Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America: Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America

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Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America. Donald D. Stull and Michael J. Broadway. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thompson. 2004, xviii. 172 pp.

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... It has been hypothesized that the sheer increase in population in some communities could foster social disorganization , bringing about an increase in crime. Popular in studies of boomtowns, 2 this hypothesis has also been proposed in studies of slaughterhouse communities (Broadway, 2000, 2007; Broadway & Stull, 2006; Markus, 2005; Stull & Broadway, 2004), and assumes that preboom communities are stable and characterized by social cohesiveness, where social control is made possible by a " high density of acquaintanceship " (Freudenberg, 1986). In areas that experience a population influx, newcomers bring new values that conflict with those of current residents and may disrupt established networks and support systems (Broadway, 1990), perhaps resulting in a reduction of informal social control and increases in personal disorganization and social isolation, exacerbating the frequency of mental breakdowns, suicide, deviance, and social isolation (Broadway, 2000, p. 40). ...
... Only nonmetropolitan counties not adjacent to metropolitan areas were analyzed to remove the potentially confounding effects of urbanization and spillover from metropolitan areas to rural counties documented in previous research (e.g., Lee & Ousey, 2001). Furthermore, rural counties in states with right-to-work laws, 4 where most slaughterhouse facilities have been relocated to (Stull and Broadway, 2004), are examined here. The result of these criteria is that 581 counties are analyzed in this study (a complete list is available from the authors). ...
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More than 100 years after Upton Sinclair denounced the massive slaughterhouse complex in Chicago as a "jungle," qualitative case study research has documented numerous negative effects of slaughterhouses on workers and communities. Of the social problems observed in these communities, the increases in crime have been particularly dramatic. These increases have been theorized as being linked to the demographic characteristics of the workers, social disorganization in the communities, and increased unemployment rates. But these explanations have not been empirically tested, and no research has addressed the possibility of a link between the increased crime rates and the violent work that takes place in the meatpacking industry. This study uses panel analysis of 1994-2002 data on nonmetropolitan counties in states with "right-to-work" laws (a total of 581 counties) to analyze the effect of slaughterhouses on the surrounding communities using both ordinary least squares and negative binomial regression. The findings indicate that slaughterhouse employment increases total arrest rates, arrests for violent crimes, arrests for rape, and arrests for other sex offenses in comparison with other industries. This suggests the existence of a "Sinclair effect" unique to the violent workplace of the slaughterhouse, a factor that has not previously been examined in the sociology of violence.
... The New York Times Magazine cover story provoked so much criticism regarding the author's claims about the girls he allegedly met and on the data he cited that the " Editors' Note " in the February 15, 2004, edition of the New York Times addressed the topic. 25 There is excellent scholarship, however, on exploitative labor practices in a number of industries in which migrants labor, such as factories (Bonacich & Appelbaum, 2000; Louie, 2001; Rosen, 2002; Ross, 1997; Ross, 2004); domestic work (Chang, 2000; Hondagneu-Sotelo, 2001; Zarembka, 2002); agriculture (Griffith & Kissam, 1995; Rothenberg, 1998); poultry processing (Fink, 2003; Striffler, 2006; Stull & Broadway, 2004); and day labor (Homeless Persons Representation Project & Casa de Maryland, 2004; Valenzuela, Theodore, Meléndez, & Gonzalez, 2006). ...
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