The tyranny of globalism

ArticleinJournal of Contemporary Asia 15(4):403-420 · January 1985with 26 Reads
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Abstract
The “… US cannot hope to compete successfully with an old-established manufacturing country such as Britain.”J.R. McCulloch as cited by Engels (1968:333).

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