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Crime prevention in a communitarian society: Bang-jiao and Tiao-jie in the People's Republic of China

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This paper examines two important strategies of community crime prevention in contemporary Chinese society: bang-jiao and tiao-jie. Bang-jiao refers to community efforts to reintegrate offenders into the community. Tiao-jie refers to community groups designed to resolve disputes among neighbors and family members, and in doing so, to reduce crime. We describe these strategies, discuss their philosophical underpinnings, and identify the features of Chinese society that support their implementation. We also explore their effectiveness with survey data from a sample of offenders in Tianjin, China. Our empirical analyses suggest that bang-jiao and tiao-jie may indeed be important structural mechanisms for crime control in a communitarian society.
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... Scholars have a growing interest in China's semiformal control (Huang, 1993a(Huang, , b, 2008(Huang, , 2019Jiang et al., 2013Jiang et al., , 2019Jiang et al., , 2021Messner et al., 2017;Zhang et al., 1996Zhang et al., , 2007. This body of literature describes and defines semiformal control in different ways. ...
... In the present day, community committees are semiformal organizations that play a crucial role in community governance (Jiang et al., 2019;Zhang and Li, 2012). In mediations, the people's mediation committee and administrative mediations are the manifestations of semiformal organizations (Sheng & Chen, 2011;Zhang et al., 1996;Messner et al., 2017). Due to increasing disputes at the community level, villagers appealed to higher level governments (shangfang) more than the legal system to settle their disputes (Michelson, 2007). ...
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Recently, Chinese government implemented and tested a trial waiver system in 18 large cities during 2016–2018. Using data collected from surveys of prosecutors and defense lawyers in one of the cities, the present study examines the main challenges in the implementation by comparing prosecutor and defense lawyer views. The main issues examined include the legal scope of trial waivers, the lawyer and victim roles in trial waivers, and the risk of corruption and power abuse. The findings indicate that lawyer respondents significantly differed from prosecutor respondents in their views on the issues. Defense lawyers were more likely to adopt a liberal stance and took a critical attitude toward the issues than prosecutors were. Their characteristic responses may well reside in their legal statuses and related interests in the Chinese legal context.
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... A disproportionate amount of recourses in supplementary education invested by Chinese families further enhance the capacity of school to exert control over students (Zhou, 1998). Schools in China are also enrolled as grassroots branches in national organizations that are responsible for students' political and moral education such as the Young Pioneer Party and the Communist Youth League (Zhang et al., 1996). These organizations aim to inculcate prosocial values and morality education and strengthen the schools in exercising social guidance and control over students' behavior (Jessor et al., 2003). ...
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... A disproportionate amount of recourses in supplementary education invested by Chinese families further enhance the capacity of school to exert control over students (Zhou, 1998). Schools in China are also enrolled as grassroots branches in national organizations that are responsible for students' political and moral education such as the Young Pioneer Party and the Communist Youth League (Zhang et al., 1996). These organizations aim to inculcate prosocial values and morality education and strengthen the schools in exercising social guidance and control over students' behavior (Jessor et al., 2003). ...
Article
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Social conflict on the borders of crime linking conflict and crime - theoretical questions the origins of social conflict - dispute careers and their relationship to crime legal responses to crime and conflict mediation, disputes, and crime police and informal justice conflict management and the role of the courts summary of propositions and research agenda for conflict-bases criminology.
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Crime prevention strategies often aim at changing the motivations and predispositions of offenders. A new approach has developed within the last dec ade which focuses on changing the behavior of potential victims. The authors explore the theoretical foundations of the new strategies for reducing crime, commonly known as community crime prevention. They suggest that the in novation is a result of a major shift in the research paradigm for studying the effects of crime. The orientation underlying community crime prevention is labeled the "victimization perspective." Following a description of some limitations in that perspective, the authors offer, as an alternative, a perspective oriented toward social control. The social control perspective, which is based on the empirical findings of several recently completed research projects, offers a theoretical foundation both for a fresh approach to the study of the effects of crime and for the development of policies for community crime prevention.