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Intragroup Conflict in Organizations: A Contingency Perspective on the Conflict-Outcome Relationship

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Abstract

In this paper, we review recent empirical work on interpersonal conflict in organizations and, by incorporating past theory and multiple disciplinary views, develop a comprehensive model of the effects of intragroup conflict in organizations from a contingency perspective. We consider: (1) the type of conflicts that exist; (2) the organizational outcome that is predicted or desired; (3) the temporal aspect of group life and conflict; and (4) the circumstances under which conflict occurs and the processes used to manage it that moderate the conflict-outcome relationship. We highlight the final aspect, the moderating factors, by presenting a conflict-outcome moderated (COM) model that delineates types of moderators which influence the conflict-outcome relationship: amplifiers (those variables that amplify the conflict-outcome relationship, strengthening both the positive and negative effects), suppressors (those variables that weaken both the positive and negative effects on outcomes), ameliorators (those variables that decrease negative effects and increase positive effects), and exacerbators (those variables that increase negative effects of conflict and decrease positive effects). We ultimately present a model of constructive intragroup conflict in organizations delineating the contingencies upon which group success, as it relates to conflict, is dependent.
... Wu et al., 2017). Conflicts were classified into: task, process, and relationship conflicts (Chen et al., 2014;Jehn & Bendersky, 2003;Jehn & Mannix, 2001;G. Wu et al., 2018). ...
Technical Report
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... Although the intention of policymakers to diversify the opportunities for youth football participation by involving multiple systems and platforms (e.g., FAs, schools and clubs) was acknowledged, the data revealed a lack of bridging mechanism between these systems, which had actuated policy conflicts. In addition to the relatively independent platforms and pathways, the lack of communication between policy actors further contributed to the task-related conflicts (Jehn & Bendersky, 2003) and inhibited the effective implementation at the operational level. ...
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Research on groups has been a major focus of concern among psychologists and sociologists for many years. The study of groups certainly deserves a central role in these disciplines since much of our behavior occurs in groups and many important social phenomena involve groups. Issues such as leadership, conformity, group decision-making, group task performance, and coalition formation have had a long history of research. However, recently a number of other areas of research have blossomed that provide interesting new perspectives on group processes (e.g., social impact). In addition, topics of research have developed outside the commonly ac­ cepted domain of group dynamics (e.g., self-disclosure) which seem to be concerned with rather basic group processes. Basic Group Processes was designed to bring together in one volume a repre­ sentative sample of the broad range of work currently being done in the area of groups. Some of the chapters provide a review of the literature while others focus more specifically on current programs of research. All, however, provide new insights into basic group processes and a number provide broad integrative schemes. All of the authors were asked to emphasize theoretical issues rather than a detailed presenta­ tion of research. Basic Group Processes suggests that research on groups is a lively enterprise and forging interesting new theoretical and empirical directions.