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The Self-Aware Universe: How Consciousness Creates the Material World

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... Istoé, tratam-se de alternativas que respondem questões de natureza para essa entidade, a consciência, obtida como parte da ontologia da interpretação da mecânica quântica analisada neste capítulo. Opto pelas propostas de Bass (1971) e Goswami (1989), por tratarem diretamente das questões apresentadas e serem alternativas pouco abordadas na literatura. ...
... Mas, dizem os sábios espirituais, os descobridores da filosofia monista idealista, embora não possamos defini-la, podemos sê-la, nós somos ela.É nossa ignorância que nos impede de ver nossa natureza original, nossa interconectividade com a fonte. (Goswami, 2001, p. 14). ...
... Dessa forma, na medida em que fazem uso referencial do Vedanta, as soluções de Bass (1971) e Goswami (1989), bem como o pensamento tardio de Schrödinger (1964), a despeito de sua plausibilidade, deveriam ser, no mínimo, precedidas por uma discussão acerca da legitimidade do uso da literatura mística como referencial ontológico para as ciências empíricas, como a mecânica quântica -o que nãoé do escopo desta discussão. ...
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This book deals with some ontological implications of standard non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and the use of the notion of `consciousness' to solve the measurement problem.
... A solution to the mind-body problem that escapes the specter of Gödel's tautology 6 [26,29] is offered here to set in place the required cosmology from which to define the 'least unit of awareness'. We propose a triune model with partial correspondence to Popper's Three Worlds approach [30] of brain/mind that involves: ...
... Recall PauIi who was wont to say "it is not even wrong" about ideas that could not be tested. As vacuum quantization proceeds as called for by Penrose [29,45,46], it is suggested that the locus of mind/matter interaction must include not only the currently considered quantum entanglement in the brain holoscape [24]; but also an essential complementarity at the unitary level [10] in order for correspondence to occur with gravity, electromagnetism, quantum theory, cosmology and information theory. We believe that incorporating the nonlocal aspects of the unitary field, not yet adequately articulated beyond any current formalism, is necessary to any model of consciousness. ...
... Furthermore, it turn s out that aspects of the mind are noncomputable, such that there is a physical reality of mind that cannot be represented with sufficient precision to lend itself to mathematical description by current tools. Penrose [29,45] argues that thinking might be noncomputable. Fortunately these noncomputable aspects can be described by extended ontological theories. ...
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For Consciousness there are two main schools of thought, the theological and the scientific, with philosophy exploring the gap. Theology for the most part has been willing to let sleeping dogs lie; but there is a growing movement to scientifically understand Consciousness (Awareness) started initially because of problems related to the role of the observer in empirical measurement. The scope of the question is broader now: Man’s place in the cosmos, the basis of evolution, what is life, why are we here, are we alone, is there life after death, is there free agency, is creation ex nihilo?
... Changes in an individual's selfawareness through intrapersonal communication, as the smallest unit of analysis in communication, will consequently have a ripple effect on the subsequent communication :components' in the system. This principle is also reflected in the recent developments in quantum physics which indicate that what occurs on the subatomic and subsystem levels reflect and influence occurrences on the systems and suprasystems levels (Goswami, 1993). These developments encourage are-consideration and evaluation of the importance of individual subsystems as components of intrapersonal communication. ...
... Moreover, an exploration of the nature of intrapersonal and transpersonal communication, that relates to and involves all the 'subatomic' components mentioned by Wolf (1985), Capra (1992) and Goswami (1993), suggets that the self and its levels and states of consciousness should be considered the quantum of communication: the smallest and most essential unit of analysis in communication. Quantum in this sense is viewed as meaning the smallest identifiable yet covert, but principal particle of a structure or cluster of structures. ...
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This article explores intrapersonal and transpersonal communication as the principal derivatives of a subjective, inner reality. These levels relate to different states and levels of consciousness and corresponding levels of selfawareness. Since an exploration of the nature of the self and its possible confluence with states and levels of consciousness necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, theories and constructs in Psychology, the New Physics (Quantum Physics), Mysticism, and Philosophy are integrated with contemporary communication notions of the self and consciousness. Integration and inclusiveness consequently form the bedrock of this article.
... It enshrines this right in it and also defines what constitute discrimination as:...any distinction, exclusion or restriction made on the basis of sex which has the effect or purpose of impairing or nullifying the recognition, enjoyment or exercise by women, irrespective of their marital status, on a basis of equality of men and women, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, civil or any other field (Article 1). 1 Some philosophers believe that natural law and natural justice are anterior and superior to positive or man-made law. In Filmer's claim that Property rights come from God to Adam and to rulers and kings through inheritance, Locke responded thus, God planted in men a strong desire also of propagating their kind and continuing themselves in their posterity; and this gives children a title to share in the property of their parents, and a right to inherit their possessions. ...
... Rather matter exist in a state of quantum of light, electrons and protons. Electron has no physical dimensionality due to it lacks density (Goswami, 1993). The question remains, if at this level matter has no density, can we still say matter reduced to sub-quanta exist in space and time? ...
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AMAMIHE: Journal of Applied Philosophy (AJAP) is published by the Department of Philosophy, Imo State University, Nigeria. AJAP is purely dedicated to the publication of original academic papers in the area of Philosophy. Results of research are presented as fresh theories, hypotheses, and analyses of new ideas or discoveries. Extensions of existing theories and review of books of this nature are also covered within the standard range of this journal.
... In quantum mechanics, a difficult concept to grasp is the idea that the observer alters physical matter (Wolf, 1988, p. 173;Lindley, 1996;Kuhn, 2000, p. 40;Goswami, 1993;Jones, 1999;Walker, 2000). The physicist John Wheeler demonstrated in delayed-choice experiments, where the experimenter waits until the last moment to insert an object in a photons path that photons respond to our delayed choice instantly and retroactively. ...
... Wheeler suggested that the most profound implication from modern physics is that "there is no out there" (1982; see also Baggott, 1992). Grappling with how modern physics may alter understanding in the social sciences will be difficult; however, that does not mean the task should not be undertaken (see Goswami, 1993). While some disciplines are starting to explore where postpositive paths may take us, there is still much emphasis on tradition and rationality evidenced by the popularity of rational choice theory-embraced by both economists and social scientists (ASA, 2019). ...
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Purpose This work examines assumptions of positivism and the traditional scientific method. Design/methodology/approach Insights from quantum mechanics are explored especially as they relate to method, measurement and what is knowable. An argument is made that how social scientists, particularly sociologists, understand the nature of “reality out there” and describe the social world may be challenged by quantum ideas. The benefits of utilized mixed methods, considering quantum insights, cannot be overstated. Findings It is the proposition of this work that insights from modern physics alter the understanding of the world “out there.” Wheeler suggested that the most profound implication from modern physics is that “there is no out there” (1982; see also Baggott, 1992). Grappling with how modern physics may alter understanding in the social sciences will be difficult; however, that does not mean the task should not be undertaken (see Goswami, 1993). A starting point for the social sciences may be relinquishing an old mechanistic science that depends on the establishment of an objective, empirically based, verifiable reality. Mechanistic science demands “one true reality – a clear-cut reality on which everyone can agree…. Mechanistic science is by definition reductionistic…it has had to try to reduce complexity to oversimplification and process to statis. This creates an illusionary world…that has little or nothing to do with the complexity of the process of the reality of creation as we know, experience, and participate in it” (Goswami, 1993, pp. 64, 66). Research limitations/implications Many physicists have popularized quantum ideas for others interested in contemplating the implications of modern physics. Because of the difficulty in conceiving of quantum ideas, the meaning of the quantum in popular culture is far removed from the parent discipline. Thus, the culture has been shaped by the rhetoric and ideas surrounding the basic quantum mathematical formulas. And, over time, as quantum ideas have come to be part of the popular culture, even the link to the popularized literature in physics is lost. Rather, quantum ideas may be viewed as cultural formations that take on a life of their own. Practical implications The work allows a critique of positivist method and provides insight on how to frame qualitative methodology in a new way. Social implications The work utilizes popularized ideas in quantum theory: the preeminent theory that describes all matter. Little work in sociology utilizes this perspective in understanding research methods. Originality/value Quantum insights have rarely been explored in highlighting limitations in positivism. The current work aims to build on quantum insights and how these may help us better understand the social world around us.
... It has historically always been straight forward to subjectively experience a proof of the existence of God, or at least a spiritual or higher form of awareness attesting to a metaphysical presence; however, the entry condition of humility or faith is often a seemingly impenetrable barrier. This subjective demonstration is compounded by the contrast in Western belief in an anthropomorphic deity and Eastern monistic traditions of awareness as an indefinable Ground of all Being experienced by deep meditation they believe is an ineffable monistic ground of all being [46] . This author, a Judeo-Christian High Priest-physicist has the opinion that experience of a Ground of all Being is a perception achieved by total emersion in the ubiquitous spirit of God, chi, ki or prāna filling all space [40,46] , missing an additional form of reality revealing anthropic properties of deity, as written in Genesis: "So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them" [47] . ...
... This subjective demonstration is compounded by the contrast in Western belief in an anthropomorphic deity and Eastern monistic traditions of awareness as an indefinable Ground of all Being experienced by deep meditation they believe is an ineffable monistic ground of all being [46] . This author, a Judeo-Christian High Priest-physicist has the opinion that experience of a Ground of all Being is a perception achieved by total emersion in the ubiquitous spirit of God, chi, ki or prāna filling all space [40,46] , missing an additional form of reality revealing anthropic properties of deity, as written in Genesis: "So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them" [47] . ...
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Natural science and theology are not mutually exclusive, but opposite ends of a broad spectrum of human intelligence.
... Free will [randomness/ determinism] is similar to the wave/particle nature of the electron, which is so beautifully described using quantum mechanics. In the wave/particle duality, the nature of the electron itself is never completely one or the other -it is both (Goswami, 1993). It is in how we observe t}J.e electron that determines whether or not it appears more like a particle or more like a wave. ...
... It is interesting that in these meditative states, the subjects come to understand a profound sense of free will. In fact, they often describe that while the individual ego may not truly have free will, there is a universal free will that seems both absolute and contentless (Goswami, 1993). ...
... It has historically always been straight forward to subjectively experience a proof of the existence of God, or at least a spiritual or higher form of awareness attesting to a metaphysical presence; however, the entry condition of humility or faith is often a seemingly impenetrable barrier. This subjective demonstration is compounded by the contrast in Western belief in an anthropomorphic deity and Eastern monistic traditions of awareness as an ineffable ground of all being experienced by deep meditation which they believe is an ineffable monistic ground of all being [46] . This author, a Judeo-Christian High Priest-physicist has the opinion that this experience of a ground of all being is a perception achieved by total emersion in the ubiquitous spirit of God, chi, ki or prāna filling all space [40,46] , myopically missing the additional parameters of reality revealing anthropic properties of deity, as written in Genesis: "So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them" [47] . ...
... This subjective demonstration is compounded by the contrast in Western belief in an anthropomorphic deity and Eastern monistic traditions of awareness as an ineffable ground of all being experienced by deep meditation which they believe is an ineffable monistic ground of all being [46] . This author, a Judeo-Christian High Priest-physicist has the opinion that this experience of a ground of all being is a perception achieved by total emersion in the ubiquitous spirit of God, chi, ki or prāna filling all space [40,46] , myopically missing the additional parameters of reality revealing anthropic properties of deity, as written in Genesis: "So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them" [47] . ...
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Article
Under the panoply that natural science and theology are not mutually exclusive, but opposite ends of a broad spectrum of human epistemology; what constitutes a pragmatic proof of God? The most primitive tool of epistemology, Myth and Superstition, which guided civilization for thousands of years, still exists to a surprising degree in modern cultures. The second tool, Logic and Reason can produce egregiously valid arguments both for and against the existence of God. The third tool of epistemology, empiricism, since Galileo has been the basis of modern experimental science; but the challenge of repeatability remains between objective and subjective modes of measurement and some experiments are deemed impossible to perform. The fourth tool, completing epistemology, transcendence, perhaps had secular origin in the noetic writings of ancient Greek philosopher Plato. It has always been possible to demonstrate the existence of God utilizing this fourth tool of epistemology, but because transcendence is generally subjective; it has not been acceptable by current definitions of pragmatic science or to nonbelievers unwilling/unable to achieve the required state-of-mind. Because of the lack of a rigorous model for a Physics of the Observer, and limitations imposed by the quantum uncertainty principle; the currently available tools of physical science have not allowed an objectively oriented empirical proof of God. This however, changes to an arguable degree with the addition of the 3 rd regime of Natural Science-Unified Field Mechanics (Classical-Quantum-UFM). The Perennial Philosophy promotes the idea that all world religions are based on a single universal truth that promotes spiritual union with God. Stated another way, the Perennial Philosophy says: If there is a God he has provided a way for Man to find him. In this work, we review logical and metaphysical methods of fulfilling this premise; but most saliently provide an empirical protocol that for the first time in history is able to demonstrate the existence of a Life Principle tantamount to the Spirit of God as a physically real noumenon, hidden until now behind the uncertainty principle. Although this represents a major step forward, there remains ineffable properties of the Spirit of God unknowable to a temporal mind; and the subtleties of a new physical UFM noetic action principle will remain engendered with concomitant bias of interpretation in what is demonstrated depending on whether one is inclined or disinclined to believe in the existence of God. Ultimately mystical experience provides the only proof of God.
... If it is assumed that the dynamic of the Self as an archetype is comparable to a strange attractor, it is possibly also analogous to the operation of archetypes as quantum patterns mentioned by Goswami (1993), Capra (1992), Zohar (1991) and Wolf (1985) in their studies on the interrelatedness between consciousness and the quantum in quantum theory. Additionally, the Self, rooted in the collective unconscious or 'undifferentiated chaos', could then be considered as the smallest and most complete psychic component in the dynamic of the psyche, hence the quantum, the 'subatomic', indiscernible yet quintessential component of intrapsychic communication. ...
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Article
This study is an exploration of how the quantum self, the quintessence of the individual, drawson archetypal symbols and mythologems during the process of intrapsychic communication. Theprocess relates to the confluence of a subjective, inner experiential reality and reality as a socialconstruct during transcendent cycles of the unique individual. The Jungian constructs of archetypalimages, symbols, myths and mythologems are considered as the derivatives of this subjective,inner reality reflected in the text of a narrative and the dreams of an individual.An archetypal and mythical semiotic textual analysis of ‘The Alchemist’ by Paolo Coehlo, and anindividual case analysis of dream symbols and a self-report based on the interpretation of a dreamtheme by using active imagination indicate that an inner, subjective transcendental reality isimminent in the individual. An intrinsic need for and representation of equanimity and unity arereflected in the images, symbols and myths of the self as archetype of meaning nested in thecollective unconscious.
... Mysterious! Similarly, most quantum physicists make it clear that they have some understanding of how quantum particles act (i.e., they can predict certain outcomes) but do not understand the why of some of these mysterious outcomes (e.g., Goswami, 1995). ...
... Consciousness refers to the ability to function beyond the physical aspect of man; physique and brain (Ramli et al., 2022;Muhamad et al., 2019;Valverde, 2015). Humans, just like everything in the universe are wave functions, and hence, consciousness does have an influence on physical reality (Goswami, 1993). According to Anis (2019), "By placing importance on subjectivity, Quantum Science has once again placed humans at centre stage as it delves into the very essence of the nonempirical: of consciousness and of life itself". ...
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Article
Corruption is seen as a very serious issue and the high cases of unethical conduct reported shows that the problem may worsen if not tackled effectively. Being part of the fast-faced globalised world we are currently living in, people tend to forget the thing closest them, their own self. Constantly being swamped and caught up with the materialistic aspect of life contributes further to the separation between man and their sense of consciousness. Hence, it is important for humans to go back to the fundamentals and be reminded as to their innate nature, role, and also purpose in life. Human governance has been introduced and said to be an internal inside-out mechanism to producing ethical conduct. It also deals with getting in touch with the vital and core essence inside each and every individual, which is their soul. This paper attempts to explore the big questions as to the "what", "who" and "why" in dealing with the complex organism known as human based on the philosophy of Human Governance. By highlighting the aspect of the human soul, it aims to essentially get people to be back in touch with their innate qualities that makes them human.
... As Freeman Dyson observed, "Mind is already inherent in every electron, and the processes of human consciousness differ only in degree but not kind from the processes of choice between quantum states which we call 'chance' when they are made by electrons" (cited in Skrbina 2005: 199). Indeed, some quantum physicists believe that the fundamental core of reality is consciousness (Goswami 1993;c.f., Lanza 2009;Wendt 2015). ...
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Article
This article focuses on the concept of worldviews, arguing that a change in managerial worldviews is the key lever for addressing the social and global challenges facing humanity. We draw from a new synthesis of science and spirituality, with the addition of “other ways of knowing” that go beyond rational-empirical analysis, to suggest that what we call Quantum Worldviews are capable of generating the prosocial and pro-environmental behavior consistent with humanistic management. Using the yin-yang symbol as a metaphor, we suggest that a transformation in consciousness, at the level of the paradigmatic assumptions held by managers about the nature of reality, can be understood through adult development theory. We also go beyond the metaphor to propose a quantum worldview based on a more literal interpretation of quantum science to fundamentally re-conceptualize what it means to be human, drawing on quantum research that suggests ontological wholeness and interdependence of all. Quantum Worldviews can help leaders, and the various systems of which they are a part, transition to a new science-based consciousness - long intuited by indigenous and nonwestern spiritual leaders - of an interconnected and dynamically coherent world. We identify a variety of practices that give managers a direct experience of Oneness, changing who they are at the deepest level of self-concept. Our research suggests that only when using such practices, and in sufficient numbers, will business leaders become agents of world benefit with the collective influence to bring about meaningful solutions to climate change and other wicked problems—in other words, needed system transformation.
... One attempt to address this is the notion that there is only one consciousness in the universe. For example, physicist A. Goswami [5] stated: "Quantum collapse is a process of choosing and recognizing by a conscious observer; there is ultimately only one observer (p. 88)." ...
... The profundity that arises from even the simplest forms of communion with nature is an empowering starting point for everyone. The self-awareness that we are an integral part of nature and that being respectful stewards is as natural as taking care of ourselves (Goswami, 1995;Venkatramaiah, 1936) will build communities with a sense of soli-darity, of sharing, of a collective mission to care for each other and for the planet (Kimmerer, 2013). In summary, purposeful attention and respect for nature across all parts of society can reinvigorate planetary health. ...
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In industrialized and urbanized societies, medical science focuses primarily on trauma and diseases, and most environmental work attempts to remediate natural and anthropogenic degradation. This essay raises the importance of shifting individual and societal attention to preventive and precautionary measures to maintain human and ecological health. It points to the growing body of research that nature (wilderness to green and blue space) is necessary for people's physical, mental, and emotional health. Such evidence should persuade the public and policymakers to proactively conserve ecosystems, reducing the need to rescue depleted species or repair and restore their degraded habitats. This paper also describes the creative tension between the need for evidence-based research to demonstrate the health benefits of nature, which can lead to public health policies that make nature exposure widely accessible, and the need to ensure that nature is not viewed merely as a "service provider"from which humans can continue to extract health benefits. The author suggests that a drastic change is needed in the prevailing attitude of dominance over nature. This essay concludes with a plea for focused attention on reciprocal healing of both nature and humans, which can occur only if our interaction with nature - be it wilderness, an urban park, or a garden - is sustained and respectful. The author suggests that the nature-and-health paradigm may be the game-changing strategy needed to sustain grassroots awareness for halting and hopefully reversing the trajectory of decline in planetary health.
... This spiritualistic energy/Ka-energy as the factor underlying cosmic functioning itself seems to be in an actualized state. In this state, actualized, at the quantum level both particle and wave (Goswami, 1993) characterize the energy. Rhythm is required for optimal accessing of the spiritualistic energy-like all energies-when in an actualized state. ...
... The view that consciousness is emergent upon matter at certain levels of organizational complexity makes many experimental results in quantum physics paradoxical, notably the observer effect, the most philosophically satisfying explanation for which is that mind is either prior to or co-arises with matter (e.g. Jeans 1930;Goswami 1993). In fact, if we attribute consciousness to any material systems, which we must do in the case of ourselves, it is logically dubious to then fail to extend it to the rest of material existence; even the simplest material forms must also have subjective and intersubjective aspects (Teilhard de Chardin 1959: 54-58;Wilber 2000a: 115-20, 126-31). ...
Book
Based on an ethnographic account of subsistence use of Amazonian forests by the Wapishana people in Guyana, Edges, Fringes, Frontiers examines the social, cultural and behavioural bases for sustainability and resilience in indigenous resource use. Developing an original framework for holistic analysis, it demonstrates that flexible interplay among multiple modes of environmental understanding and decision-making allows the Wapishana to navigate social-ecological complexity successfully in ways that reconcile short-term material needs with long-term maintenance and enhancement of the resource base.
... Ironically, the advance of modern science has undermined its basic assumptions and created another scientific revolution that appears to be leading thinkers back to many of the ideas associated with the philosophical religions of India and China (e.g., Pagels 1988;Laughlin 2005;Kauffman 2008;Smolin 2013). This 'religious' thought appears in the work of theoretical physicist Amit Goswami (1993), quantum physicist David Bohm (1980), and Kauffman's (2008) identification of radical creativity with the sacred. ...
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Article
This paper begins exploring an alternative model for thinking about religion. In this alternative view, religion emerged as our evolutionary ancestors faced a challenge common to members of all species: evolving body structures that enabled them to know exactly what they needed to survive in a highly complex, continually shifting environment. In this way, bats rely mostly on sound to model the world, and dogs depend mostly on smell. For our evolutionary ancestors , natural selection chose the genes that would create a brain that transformed the world around them into story-like constructions. Religion emerges in myth as those ancestors faced the powerful forces that often overwhelmed them, driving events such as birth and death, abundance and famine. Moreover, as our ancestors moved out from the rainforests of East Africa to the savannah, natural selection further chose for the ability to cooperate, first through brain developments and then rituals. The stories and rituals that developed as these two developments intertwined enabled hunter-gatherers not only to survive, but to spread across Eurasia. In fact, these myths and rituals proved so powerful that they would enable human beings to create societies of increasing social complexity, as their communities skyrocketed from bands of 20 to cities of 20 million. We are what we remember, which is another way of saying that we are nothing other than the stories we tell about ourselves and our past.
... The evolution of scientific investigation has been one of increasing use of formalism, in both mathematics and physics. 4 Recognizing that mathematics is often referred to as the science of patterns, it is interesting to speculate that scientific progress and the growth of our individual understanding of qualified reality have given more credence to the concept that reality is made up of patterns. Patterns are defined as relationships and structures in time, space or both. ...
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Book
Reality is essentially subjectively unknowable, existing as an image, perception, perspective or belief generated by a person, group or society. Nevertheless, consciousness, supported by our unconscious mind/brain and bootstrapped through social collaboration, is the only resource available to observe, create and comprehend our existence. In this little book we explore the various ways that we as humans participate in co-creating our reality This is a series of 22 short books, what we call Conscious Look Books, that are conversational in nature, taking full advantage of the reader's lived experience to share what can sometimes be difficult concepts. We live in a world that is tearing itself apart, where people are out of control and wanting to control others, rebelling from years of real and perceived abuse and suppression of thought. Yet, this chaos offers us as a humanity the opportunity to make a giant leap forward. By opening ourselves to ourselves, we are able to fully explore who we are and who we can become. With that exploration comes a glimmer of hope as we begin to reclaim the power of each and every mind developed by the lived human experience! These 22 concepts are part of the learning journey of which we are all a part, the Intelligent Social Change Journey (ISCJ). This is a developmental journey of the body, mind and heart, moving from the heaviness of cause-and-effect linear extrapolations, to the fluidity of co-evolving with our environment, to the lightness of breathing our thought and feelings into reality. Grounded in development of our mental faculties, these are phase changes, each building on and expanding previous learning in our movement toward intelligent activity. These little books share 22 large concepts from the Profundity and Bifurcation of Change (which is written from an academic viewpoint). Each book is independent and includes seven ideas offered for the student of life to help us become the co-creators that we are. These books, available in soft cover from Amazon, support idea exploration, class discussion, other discussion groups or can be used as special occasion gifts.
... [1] Hence, we are in a transition phase to go beyond the physical world, grounded on the matter-based paradigm by turning our tables toward consciousness-based paradigm as mentioned by Prof. Goswami. [2] Science has moved slowly and steadily over centuries to unfold the deeper and deeper secrets of our physical world and trying to understand more and more about other physical worlds such as planets, stars, and galaxies through various powerful instruments such as ultramodern telescopes and space satellites. Science is also trying to understand the functioning of microscopic particles through sophisticated microscopes. ...
... Assim, as propensões da componente «mente-cérebro quântica» são transmitidas de uma encarnação para outra, através da não-localidade da mente holográfica [80]. A teoria da mente holográfica, proposta por Karl Pribram [81] e David Bohm, defende que o tempo físico e as três dimensões do espaço físico são «projecções» feitas pelo cérebro a partir da mente holográfica não-local (que contém os padrões Junguianos vitais, emocionais e mentais). ...
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Article
Nas religiões Ocidentais o conceito de «vida após a morte» tem sido relacionado com ressurreição e moralidade, enquanto que nas religiões Orientais o mesmo conceito tem sido interligado com reencarnação e karma. Este artigo pretende ser uma contribuição para o estudo mais profundo deste tema da «vida após a morte», através da abordagem de algumas experiências da mecânica quântica e das ciências cognitivas que apoiam as teorias religiosas da reencarnação e ressurreição, conceitos tão importantes para a filosofia da ética.
... Theoretical physicists have recently written amply about the alleged implications of quantum mechanics to make broad claims about the nature of reality as a whole. Statements such as, "interconnected", "everything is one", "consciousness made the physical world" are common in their renderings (Bohm, 1980;Goswami, 1995;Greenstein, 1988). Of note, Vernon Neppe, a neuropsychiatrist and Close, a physicist, have developed a metaparadigm (Triadic Dimensional-Distinction Vortical Paradigm model-TDVP) which involve a large-scale research programme for the scientific enterprise (Vernon and Close, 2012). ...
... However, at the same time, phenomena like near death (NDEs), out of body experiences (OBEs), and extra-sensory perception also exist, which cannot be interpreted within the 11 THE FOUNDATION OF AN UPCOMING CIVILIZATION traditional materialistic theoretical frame. Taking together the unsolved questions of neuroscience as the hard problem, and the existence of such phenomena as NDEs and OBEs, an ever increasing number of studies and books appear, which already utilize the transcendental approach (Brabant, 2016;Bravo & Grob, 1989;Cardena, 2016;Chalmers, 1995;Dein & Bhui, 2013;Eccles, 1994;Eccles & Popper, 1977;Facco, Lucangeli, & Tressoldi, 2017;Frecska & Luna, 2006;Goswami, 1993;Hameroff & Penrose, 2014;Kelly et al., 2007;Lanza & Berman, 2009Machleidt & Sieberer, 2013;Morris, 2001;Neppe & Close, 2014;Noda, 2011;Parnia & Fenwick, 2002;Schwartz & Begley, 2002;Varela, 1996;V ızi, 2005). One of the latest books is the Transcendent Mind, published by the rather conservative American Psychological Association. ...
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The article first of all holds that environmental regulation has failed. This is because it is too weak to prevent the overstepping of ecological boundaries by humanity. In this legal regulation is reflected that human behavior is psychopathological. This collective mental illness may originate from false self-identification. Therefore, the author reviews the outcomes of modern natural sciences, such as quantum physics, cosmology, and nonlocal consciousness research. These results give sufficient support to argue, despite the traditional paradigm of materialism, that some aspects of consciousness are not limited by the space–time continuum. Moreover, all consciousness, regardless of its physical manifestations, is part of the universal Consciousness. From these scientific results, in line with ancient scriptures, an Eternal Order has evolved, which can be described at least by four fundamental and universal truths. This Eternal Order should be taken into account by positive law if humanity wants to reach fulfillment within the ecological limits of the Earth.
... With MPD, an individual typically presents a conglomerate of more or less separate psychological and physiological systems in the form of predisposed personalities, each with unique medical profiles [16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30] . Dysfunctional behavior between and among personalities is sustained by overly restrictive habits of selective attention, accompanied by fear of sharing experiences involving mutual recognition, connection or integration, since these connote loss and death instead of fulfillment and growth (19,p.8). ...
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The Human Connection (HC) Project has been created to reinforce the underlying sense that human beings are innately psychologically and physiologically linked, even when in widely-separated geographic locations. By presenting scientific demonstrations of nervous system interactivity occurring among spatially separated people in the form of ninety second news releases, the HC Project will offer an alternative to the current scientific world view, in which humans are considered physically isolated beings. The expectation is that our collective 'mind-set' can be altered by successfully focusing international attention on undeniable images of human interconnectedness. Also, people will be taught how to increase a sense of connection, even under informal conditions. To further this aim, educational methods --including workshops, seminars and group biofeedback techniques-- are being developed for use in families, schools and communities. These will involve, but not be limited to, people engaged in sports, the arts, corporate management, public services, and professional organizations. Such methods will explain and encourage more positive forms of behavior and they will facilitate lasting experiences of interpersonal alignment, group insight and creative cooperative activity. As educational programs and media presentations become better equipped to explore human interconnectedness, as an accessible resource, it is hypothesized that there will be a gradual yet irreversible shift in the way people pay attention to themselves and others.
... Tais teorias versam sobre perguntas que inquietam não apenas os especialistas, como também toda a humanidade; respostas para esses mistérios têm sido formuladas ao longo dos séculos desde as narrativas antigas como a Teogonia de Hesíodo e a Bíblia, entre inúmeras outras. Ao longo das últimas décadas, uma série de autores, entre eles, Capra (1975), Chopra (1989 e Goswami (1993) têm utilizado conceitos da física para fundamentar questões relacionadas à religião e à consciência humana, tal uso é criticado por autores como Stenger (1997) que polemiza abertamente com tais autores, classificando-os depreciativamente ora como "misticismo quântico", ora como "charlatanismo quântico". ...
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Resumo O presente artigo analisa publicações feitas por páginas de divulgação científica brasileira no Facebook, tomando como base o conceito de responsividade proveniente da teoria bakhtiniana. Em virtude de as redes sociais disponibilizarem meios estandardizados e quantificáveis de formas responsivas, investiga parte das consequências produzidas por esse tipo de interatividade online. Concilia dados qualitativos e quantitativos do corpus analisado para produzir uma interpretação sobre o ato de curtir no Facebook. Como material, coletou todas as publicações, durante quatro meses, das páginas da Pesquisa FAPESP, Scientific American Brasil e Superinteressante. O resultado permite identificar características discursivas e temáticas dos posts que obtiveram maior repercussão entre os leitores, assim como estabelecer relações entre a leitura hipertextual, a web 2.0 e as formas responsivas produzidas nesse contexto.
... Over the years various theories have been introduced to explain collapse with the hope of answering the above questions. Various mechanisms have been proposed: complexity causes collapse -the more complex a system, the more likely it is to collapse [24]; or consciousness itself causes collapse [25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40]; or gravity causes collapse -the larger the mass, the more likely collapse will occur [41]. These models can therefore explain why Schrödinger's cat is never seen, or measured, as being in a superposition state. ...
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In this article I aim to provide an intuitive and non-technical introduction to decoherence and quantum Darwinism. Together these theories explain how our classical reality emerges from an underlying quantum mechanical description. Here I focus on two aspects of this and explain, firstly, how decoherence can tell us why we never see macroscopic superpositions, such as dead-and-alive cats, in our classical surroundings; and secondly I describe and then provide a resolution to the so-called preferred basis problem. I then introduce recent results demonstrating that certain aspects of classicality are generic phenomena that emerge from the basic mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. This is in stark contrast to previous work in this field that focused on specific models that cannot realistically be scaled up to explicitly answer questions about the macroscopic world. Finally, I demonstrate how decoherence and quantum Darwinism can shed significant light on the measurement problem, and I discuss the implications for how we should interpret quantum mechanics.
... The holographic nature of this perspective of UCS also embraces the language of quantum physics (Bohm, 2002;Bohm & Peat, 1987;Haramein, 2017;Haramein, Hyson, & Rauscher, 2008), biology (Sheldrake, 2009), complexity science (Kelso & Scott, 2016), and holistic nursing (Dossey & Keegan, 2016) as well as cosmic (Currivan, 2017) and consciousness studies (Goswami, 1995). ...
... porary science. Recent literature on these interactions is abundant: Burgers, I 975;Berezin, 1990Berezin, , 1992Berezin and Nakhmanson, 1990;Germine, 1991;Miller, 1991;Herbert, 1985;Harris, 1991;Siler, 1990;Combs and Holland, 1990;Jahn and Dunne, 1988;Radin and Nelson, 1989;Penrose, 1989;Stevens, 1990;Wolf, 1989Wolf, , 1990Goswami, 1993. Isotopicity provides a unifying heuristic to connect organisms with atomic-molecular and, perhaps, with nuclear and subnuclear levels. ...
... However, the ultimate purpose of my intellectual curiosity is practical: I am seeking to make sense of my life and of the complexity in the human systems in which I work, learn, play, and live in order to facilitate healing and transformation. Some of the theoretical frameworks that inform my work include systems thinking, in particular soft, critical and emancipatory systems perspectives (e.g., Checkland, 1993;Jackson, 1991;Ulrich, 1983;Flood, 1995); complexity and evolutionary theory (e.g., Laszlo, 2004;Maturana, 2002;Heron & Reason, 1997), transformation, learning and adult development (e.g., Mezirow, 2000;Metzner, 1998;Grof, 1988;Kegan, 1980;Freire, 1996, Campbell, 2008, participatory decision making and collective wisdom approaches (e.g., Macy & Brown, 1998;Owen, 2008, Brown, 2005), developmental perspectives of leadership (e.g., Torbert, 2004;Rooke & Torbert, 2005;Merry, 2009;Collins, 2001;Anderson & Adams, 2016), consciousness studies (e.g., Laszlo, 2016;Dalai Lama, 2006;Goswami, 1995), creativity and innovation (e.g., Cameron, 2002;Csikszentmihalyi, 2013;Kelly, 2001) and sustainability and social entrepreneurship (United Nations, 2017;McDonough & Braungart, 2013;Sanford, 2011Sanford, , 2014Mulgan, 2007). Some of the methodological approaches that inform my practice include action research (Burns, 2007;Laszlo & Schulz, 2017), social systems design (Banathy, 1996), design thinking (Brown, 2009), and theory U ( Scharmer, 2009). ...
... Unfortunately, our familiarity with many of the concepts of classical mechanics led us to consider them not only to represent a description of an objective reality, but to be that objective reality. When the subjective dependence of these concepts on an observer was revealed, instead of questioning the presumed objective nature of the concepts of classical mechanics, people began to question the concept of an objective reality and whether reality could exist without an observer [15,16,17,18,19,20]. ...
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... Yet Western medical science has stubbornly insisted on ignoring the implications of this. Works like Capra's The Tao of Physics [3], Lanza's Biocentrism [4], Goswami's Self-Aware Universe [5], Cohen's Way of Qigong [6], McTaggart's The Field [7] and Sheldrake's The Science Delusion [8] certainly helped popularize and map the territory for a Kuhnian paradigm shift--pointing out the shallowness and explanatory vacuousness of orthodox Western science, and speculating where to 'go next' with a viable post-materialist worldview. But the solid philosophical foundation for such a new paradigm--in terms of metaphysics and epistemology--was only implied in those works. ...
... In other words: how is it possible that a very low intensity signal, subject to noise and decay, might enable such precise communications in the life world? For some scientists, there are already enough data to support the Energetic phenomena in the life world are an argument of interest in several applied and theoretical fields with roots in biology, medicine and biomedical engineering, but also, in a more humanistic approach, gave birth to an environment of theoretical reflections, such as Meneghetti's semantic fields [1], Sheldrake's morphic resonance [2], Backster's primary perception [3], and more recently, research relating consciousness and quantum physics [4][5][6]. ...
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This paper presents a brief review of distant biological communication phenomena, information fields explained as a transduction of information without energy displacement, experimental requirements for testing this hypothesis with human beings using electrophotonic analysis, oxymetry and electromagnetic shielding. Finally, authors present preliminary results and future work on this new field of interdisciplinary research.
Chapter
This chapter discusses a frequent criticism of materialism: that its conception of the world fails to provide a space for human subjectivity. With this in mind, texts by Marx are analyzed that provide elements—contrary to that criticism—for the approach of different subjective dimensions. At first, human labor is investigated as an intervention in the world that carries the marks of the subject who performs it. In the second part of the chapter, the subjective presence existing in the formation of human knowledge is examined. In both moments, Marx’s distance from a philosophical objectivism and from liberal subjectivism is unmistakable.
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Alexander Wendt claims that quantum physics explains deep mysteries about human consciousness and offers a radical new understanding of human behavior and social interaction. However, the claims rest on flawed interpretations of quantum theory, fringe literatures and metaphorical, almost mystical uses of quantum concepts and buzzwords. He fails to provide any account of human conflict, and defends an almost theological view of the importance of humanity in the universe that is incompatible with a scientific perspective.
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In the second part of the study, the author continues to build a unified concept of energy interactions based on the hypothesis of a universal mechanism operating at all levels of matter. Previous attempts to create a ‘theory of everything’ failed as they proposed different mechanisms for various interactions. The other problem is that they invent virtual non-observable particles as carriers of interaction. Each time the experiment results fall out of the model’s predictions, a new particle pops out of the hat by a wave of a magic wand. The outcome is that mainstream theories do not have predictive power, and their explanatory power is based on the mysterious properties of virtual ghosts. Carried away by the convenience of the description that could be applied to any phenomena without the risk of being refuted, we lost the physical and common sense in our physical models. It is time to come back to the senses. Currently, the ‘particle zoo’ has hundreds of inhabitants, and game rules are so complex that even the founders of the Standard Model of particle physics confess that it is incomprehensible and inconsistent. Some think that this reflects the complexity of nature. But is it really complex in its fundamental laws? It demonstrates the same regularities in all kinds of energy interactions, and their mathematical description can be as simple as ratios of integer numbers. Do we have to complicate our models and multiply entities to infinity? The author stops this endless spiral of ghosts and turns to the physical meaning. Thus, he gets theoretical physics back to science. The book offers a consistent description of a wide range of phenomena and shows that the Theory of Energy Harmony can explain common regularities of all energy interactions. The new theory is not a ‘heaven-sent revelation’ but is grounded on research done by generations of scientists. It just takes their ideas a little further and overcomes the disintegrated state of different areas of physics. The book also contains bridges to the following volumes of the series that will take us from non-living to living matter, starting from the general levels of description and going down to the finest physical, physiological and technological details on how living systems form, function, develop and adapt to the world in which they exist.
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In the most ancient Indian texts, in the Rigveda, one of the hymns famously known as ‘nasadiyasuktham’ says when there was neither existence nor nonexistence what existed? In profound depths what existed at the beginning from which everything else has emerged. Answers to these questions were found, in the most ancient times. In the Vedas and Upanishads, these answers are found. But the questions are asked again and again and answers are restated. It is the wisdom of the ancient philosophers but now stated in the language of modern scientists. As far as the macrocosm (the universe) concerns the ancients are contributed a lot, now our understanding is much deeper with modern physics and cosmology. As far as the microcosm (mind & consciousness) concerns Vedanta and other Indian systems of Philosophy have very valid and deep insights. This is much more than modern understanding given by consciousness studies. Modern science has an edge over ancient wisdom in describing the universe with the help of physics, chemistry and describes the body with the help of biology and physiology. But closer and closer it comes to ourselves; the ancient wisdom is better than modern science. A grand synthesis and profound understanding of Indian Ancient philosophy on macrocosm & microcosm, root cause of human suffering, ancient wisdom to remove suffering, “Law of Karma” and its implications are presented in detail in this article.
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This chapter summarises the development of systems thinking and goes on to uncover some of its limitations. First, a brief sweeping overview of the history and development of systems thinking is provided. Next, the development of applied systems thinking in terms of three successive waves is recounted briefly—hard systems thinking which assumes that systems are representative of reality; soft systems thinking which emphasises the intersubjective construction of realities; and critical systems thinking , which attempts to build a more comprehensive framework. The contributions and limitations are summarised. The focus is, firstly, on recounting the key milestones; secondly, panning the basic features of the recent approach called systemic intervention; and thirdly, on uncovering the ontological and epistemological premises and describing the limitations which the book will address in later chapters.
Chapter
The systems ontology is characterised, corresponding to recent systemic findings about the nature of reality. Three key features, an idea of the interconnectedness of all things, the idea of enactive cognition , and an idea of the teleonomic principle, are suggested as central to a systems perspective. The irrationality inhering in the modern outlook and its rigid and limited view of basic ontological elements such as space and time is described. The debates and understanding of cognition are reviewed and the enactive idea of cognition is elaborated by incorporating a model called the anticipatory present moment . The inherent paradoxes in reality as constructed from purely rational frames are described. The chapter concludes by stating plausible political , epistemic, and pragmatic goals for systems thinking that follow on this systems ontology.
Chapter
There is an obvious analogy between the concept of the vacuum state in quantum field theory and that of ‘emptiness’ or Śūnya. When the mind settles down in meditation to the state of pure consciousness, it has lost all content, all feelings and all emotions, and qualia or qualities also disappear. Some describe the state as fullness, a ‘field of all possibilities’, while others emphasize its lack of content. As the Bhagavad Gita, II.45, puts it, ‘nistraigunyo bhavārjuna’, ‘be without the three gunas’. Only from a state of purity of the heart and mind can a human fully realize his or her potential and act fully in accordance with all the laws of nature. Our approach shows that such a state is empty of wave functions or quantum fields and that the human mind achieves a state where all such excitations are annihilated.
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This research is about the information field class of theories and its experimental test with human beings. Chapter 1 gives an overview of biological communication phenomena, mainly within microorganisms, showing how scientific hypothesis evolved from chemical-electrical schemes to electromagnetic waves and, finally, to quantum field especulations. From another perspective, decades of scientific struggle lead physicists to prove quantum entanglement, paving the road the hypothesis of information fields. Chapter 2 presents two complementary information field theories in the frontiers between Physics, Biology, Psychology and Theory of Knowledge: the semantic field theory, which rises from Meneghetti’s clinical activities in the 70’s, and Rupert Sheldrake’s morphic field theory, which rises from his research in Biology. Chapter 3 presents experimental design, methods and research instruments. In quantum physics, the best equivalent for an “information transduction without energy displacement” is the entanglement phenomenon, considered “bizarre” by Einstein and others (EPR, 1935) and proven only in 1982 by Alain Aspect and his colleagues. Based in their work, an analogous experiment was proposed to investigate the information field phenomenon in the human level. Three precautions had to be taken: (1) eliminating the possibility of the emitter to give instructions to the receptor; (2) randomness relative to the communication moment; and (3) use of dreams as an element akin to represent the energetic state of participants. During measurements, an ETS Lindgren Series 81 Faraday cage and a 250 meters distance were used to ensure subjects were physically distant and electromagnetically isolated. Chapter 4 presents results for 100 measurements conducted with 50 couples of subjects. Pulse Rate, SpO2 and R-R intervals were measured with oximetry equipments and Energy (Joules) was measured using the EPI/GDV technology. A series of statistical analysis were conducted using SPSS© and HRV analysis with the Kubios Standard Software to test the hypothesis of a distant impact in the Autonomic Nervous System of subjects inside the Faraday cage during the moment of communication. It was possible to verify with p < 0.01 that control group behaves quite differently from experimental group in most physiological variables measured and there is also evidence to affirm that images of dreams have a strong relationship with the energetic states of dreamers, considering its impact in the ANS balance. Statistical analysis included ANOVA and Scheffé tests, enriched with graphical analysis to support the discussions conducted in Chapter 5. Future work and Conclusions were presented in the last section. Experiments will be improved in six majour aspects: (a) larger distances between subjects; (b) larger number of subjects; (c) EEG and ENS measurements; (d) procedures to enable “hearing” instead of “reading” dreams; (e) subjects with different levels of nearness and, last, but not least, (f) double blind design.
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This book gathers a selection of articles made in context of the International Congress on Contemporary European Painting, held at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Porto, in April 3, 4 and 5, 2017.
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Consciousness cannot be articulated. In the unconditional state it is inexpressible. However, this Transcendental Reality could be naturalized internally by the human brain, which has been evolutionarily primed to do this. On the other side, externally, this has been a spontaneous happening in nature. Two pathways meet, although over a long time gap, at the sensory apparatus as “perception” of the experience of the Objective Reality (OR). This paper describes the steps in this process with involvement of four primary operations. From ontological point of view the author identifies the operators as consciousness, self, life, mind and information working together with the brain and shows that they form an orchestra which has been traditionally called psyche, which acts as inter-phase between brain-bound and brain-independent consciousness. From epistemological point of view the operations, labeled bottom up as operation I, II, III and IV which although occur in both inside the brain and in the external world, get more emphasis in the description of happenings in the external world. They seem to form a systems of orchestrated communication of the Objective Reality in a non-reductive way to the senses as signal. In this communication, Consciousness remains the First, Mind and its operation is the Final common path, and the Signal signifies the closure of causal drainage at the level of the matter..
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https://bdigital.ufp.pt/handle/10284/7714
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essays | archive | digital | ka mate ka ora | pasifika | features new zealand electronic poetry centre six pack | authors | about us | events | what's new | home k a m a t e k a o r a a new zealand journal of poetry and poetics issue 13, march 2014 index Cultivating inter-being: human-plant society in Mei-mei Berssenbrugge's Hello, the Roses Jen Crawford This paper considers Mei-mei Berssenbrugge's 2013 collection, Hello, the Roses, as an example of poetry as social action. The poetry is social in the general sense that, as Theodor Adorno suggests of all lyric poetry, its language "establishes an inescapable relationship to the universal and to society", even when it "assimilates itself completely into subjective impulses" (43). Unlike the lyrics described by Adorno, however, and despite a recent review of Hello, the Roses in the New York Times claiming that "Berssenbrugge would be hard pressed to notice other people walking along the mesa," these poems don't make social withdrawal their rule. This is first apparent on their surface, in their engagement in a society of text: like much of Berssenbrugge's work, many of these poems are written "through" and in response to specific source texts. Most visibly in this volume she is working with Deleuze's Pure Immanence, and its descriptions of the work of David Hume and Friedrich Nietzsche, but other texts quoted and paraphrased include Mircea Eliade's The Sacred and the Profane and Amit Goswami's The Self-Aware Universe. While one might also pick out other defining interactions between humans (as individuals and groups) in the poems, this paper is primarily concerned with the poems' social action in defining and extending a further social realm: one with human-plant relations at its "verdant heart". These relations as Berssenbrugge explores them are themselves sociable, in that they are based in communication, in sustained conscious co-presence and, at another level, in unity of being. "Different species communicate and energies of environment and its inhabitants merge", she writes in "Winter Whites" (31). It is worth noting that the relations of different species within that shared being are essentially amicable in character, as the title of the volume suggests, calling to mind the Latin socius as indicating comradeship and alliance; the relational quality characterised within the volume is cooperative, and indeed loving. The poems are intently focused on awareness and communication within this realm of shared being. As they work through that focus they are often grounded in sensory description, but Berssenbrugge is not so much writing images as writing image movement within carefully devised systems of affect. The poems are informed by Hume's conception of the social and institutional role of the imagination as having the ability to extend individual passion beyond the partiality of egotistic self-interest. In Hume's thinking (as described by Deleuze in Pure Immanence) imagination has the power both to lead people into moral, judicial or political sentiments that can consider others, and to help cultivate the development of institutions accordingly (including the instutitions of taste and culture) (Pure Immanence 47). The social action of these poems is part of that work: in writing an affective intimacy between humans and plants within a greater ecology, Berssenbrugge is inventing, naturalising and attuning a relational framework in language that alters some of the givens of the current social imaginary. Given that there is in most contemporary culture little sophisticated social imaginary that is inclusive of plants (however they might feature in our economic imaginaries), we can see where that alteration begins. The poems invoke, define and extend several forms of relation between plants and human-animals across the volume. To explore these differentiations, and the work of the poems themselves as linguistic forms, it is helpful to invoke the idea of the hologram as an organising metaphor. While this metaphor might seem, at first glance, oddly exterior to the social-organic network being explored, it is proposed by the work itself, and has multiple functions as an image structure for the dimensionality of the poetry, and for the differentiating contexts that poetry offers for human-plant relations.
Book
Religion and science are arguably the two most powerful social forces in the world today. But where religion and science were once held to be compatible, many people now perceive them to be in conflict. This unique book provides the best available introduction to the burning debates in this controversial field. Examining the defining questions and controversies, renowned expert Philip Clayton presents the arguments from both sides, asking readers to decide for themselves where they stand: • science or religion, or science and religion? • history and philosophy of science • the role of scientific and religious ethics – modifying genes, extending life, and experimenting with human subjects • religion and the environmental crisis • the future of science vs. the future of religion. Thoroughly updated throughout, this second edition explores religious traditions from around the world and provides insights from across the sciences, making this book essential reading for all those wishing to come to their own understanding of some of the most important debates of our day.
Chapter
No single piece of writing expresses the tension between the spiritual and the psychological as well as James Hillman’s 1975 essay, “Peaks and Vales,” where he describes the difference between the spirit’s heights and the soul’s depths. For Hillman, spirit and soul describe contrasting modes of imagination, with the former associated with the movement up and out and the latter down and in. In even approaching these themes through their accompanying metaphors and images, Hillman was “showing how soul looks at spirit, how peaks look from the vale.” For, he says, “from the soul’s point of view we can never get out of the vale of our psychic reality.” This chapter will explore the significance of this soul perspective when considering the spiritual nature of mysticism. I will argue it is not only the character of our time, but something intrinsic to the mystical vision itself that invites keeping the soul perspective close at hand. I finally suggest the mystic may be more soul-bound than we may assume, and mystical experiences may illustrate an ultimately necessary bond between spirit and soul.
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This essay is an attempt to make clear what my philosophical ‘map’ is, to explore the ground that I stand on, not only as a therapist but also how I make sense of the world and our place in it. It presents a view of therapy and spirituality and how they relate to each other. I guess I started this enquiry nearly 50 years ago…writing that gives me a strange sensation. I hope you find it interesting!
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