Article

Usefulness of Genetic Testing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Real-world Practice

Unidad de Insuficiencia Cardiaca y Miocardiopatías, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Majadahonda, Madrid, España.
Revista Espa de Cardiologia (Impact Factor: 3.79). 07/2013; 66(9). DOI: 10.1016/j.recesp.2013.04.004
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Available from: Tomas Ripoll Vera, Aug 27, 2014
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