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Discussion Note: Using Metaphors to Understand and to Change Organizations: A Critique of Gareth Morgan's Approach

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Abstract

A critique of Gareth Morgan's approach to metaphor is used as the vehicle for an assessment of the value of metaphoric thinking to understanding and acting in organizations. Metaphor is shown to be an epistemologically valid approach to making sense of organizations, although not at the expense of traditional literal language approaches. Metaphoric thinking is located within the OD model of organizational change, where it functions as a valuable aid to cognitive change, while sharing some of the limitations of OD itself. Some issues for further research are outlined.
... The fourth, the existing research on improvisation frequently follows the jazz model and is not holistic due to it being primarily used as a metaphor. According to McCort (1997) [17] and Morgan (1996) [22] , this model has limitations in directly being transferred to business application. The results of this article benefit the participant corporate leaders, leaders' staff, coworkers, families and corporates, corporate training programs and anyone looking for more research on utilizing techniques of improvisation in corporate leadership development. ...
... The fourth, the existing research on improvisation frequently follows the jazz model and is not holistic due to it being primarily used as a metaphor. According to McCort (1997) [17] and Morgan (1996) [22] , this model has limitations in directly being transferred to business application. The results of this article benefit the participant corporate leaders, leaders' staff, coworkers, families and corporates, corporate training programs and anyone looking for more research on utilizing techniques of improvisation in corporate leadership development. ...
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