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Abstract

The structural characteristics of the Hong Kong construction industry, most notably its elaborate system of subcontracting and the casual basis on which labour is employed, pose serious problems for safety managers. By international standards, Hong Kong's construction industry performs very badly in the area of safety. Recent work in the UK and Finland highlights the effectiveness of behavioural techniques to improve safety performance on construction sites. Work is currently under way to test these techniques in the Hong Kong construction setting. The structural properties of the Hong Kong construction industry have been taken into consideration and labour commitments to the group and to the organization have been identified for additional consideration in research. It is expected that these variables will intervene in the application of behavioural techniques to determine their effectiveness. This paper investigates the theoretical background to commitment at the group and organizational level and presents a site level research model which is illustrative of the possible effects that group and organization level commitment may be found to have on the use of behavioural techniques.
... However, proven in other studies in higher-risk industries, the reactive measure does not appear to have sufficient accuracy. For instance, in the construction industry, contractors usually underreport the number of incidents due to feeling afraid of the legal consequences after any incidents (Lingard and Rowlinson, 1994). In reality, the adequacy of this criterion depends on how often employers record incidents of missed days due to accidents and how well workers understand their job's legal responsibilities (Jaselskis et al., 1996). ...
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... "Ref. [11]" defined safety as "the control of recognized hazards to attain an acceptable level of risk". Safety is also defined by [12] as the "freedom from (unacceptable) risk of harm to persons which may also encompass environmental or asset damage/loss". ...
... Thus, this aspect is indeed a favorable leadership factor of all the Libyan companies. Lingard and Rowlinson (1994) discussed that safety legislation must be taken into account when planning job activities and setting up company policies. The current study has shown that Libyan companies have fulfilled the requirements mandated by the Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSMS). ...
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The quality of leadership is one of the most important factors in determining the success and survival of groups and organizations. Although technologies play an overriding part in certain conditions, effective leadership has often compensated for lack of equipment and resources and it would be difficult to imagine a world without leaders. This paper hopes to identify the key factors for effectiveness leadership (in Libya) and how they contribute to the success of construction companies (from the unique perspectives of the leaders). It is specifically focused on how functional competences can contribute to an effective leadership in the construction companies in Libya. Questionnaire was carried out by getting feedback from various ranged construction companies in Libya. Of 280 distributed questionnaires, two hundred and fifty five (255) useable questionnaires (91% response rate) were received and analyzed. As results, the study revealed that all the functional competence factors included in the survey show a positive and significant relationship with company establishment and strategy management system (SMS). Furthermore, the results identified some functional competence factors showing significant contribution to an effective leadership in the Libyan construction industry.
... The identified environmental impacts in this study were contamination of land and groundwater, surface and groundwater, flora and fauna including weeds and pathogens, air Since the majority of incidents have occurred between 10:00 am and 04:00 pm, the strategy to reduce the frequency of incidents is to make more breaks during this time period for lunch break and coffee breaks. Also, this trends and findings are similar to the time when mostly occupational accidents occurred on construction sites in Singapore 103 . In addition, mostly of incidents on construction sites in Hong Kong happened around noon 104 . ...
... Hence, this may deliver the wrong conclusions in terms of improving safety performance. Lingard and Rowlinson (1994) also mentioned that misreporting is a serious concern for construction site safety in Hong Kong. Therefore, it is obvious that contractors might manipulate safety data even though it is prohibited by law. ...
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