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Political Subjectivity: Applications of Q Methodology in Political Science

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... This step is for developing a list of statements that are representative of the broad viewpoints concerning a topic, which is called the Q-population [15]. Q-population development relies on a literature review and interviews, but in fact, more statements can be obtained through interviews than through a literature review [16]. ...
... The group of participants who classify Q-samples in a Q-study is called a P-sample [17]. Brown [15] recommends that 40 to 60 participants are suitable for most studies; however, some specific studies may require a much smaller number of participants. For selecting the P-sample, convenience sampling was conducted, and the same criteria for choosing the participants in the in-depth interviews were applied. ...
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