Facing still faces: What visual cues affect infants' observations of others?

ArticleinInfant behavior & development 36(4):583-586 · July 2013with 42 Reads 
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Abstract
We used eye-tracking technique to examine gaze shifts of 9-, 16-, and 24-month-old infants who were presented with still images of a conversation between two individuals facing each other or turning away from each other. The results showed that body orientation, as measured by the face-to-face effect, is sufficient to provide infants with crucial information about others' social engagement.

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  • ... 1). Although a study examining infants' gaze shifts for the face-to-face and back-to-back models suggested that 9-month-old infants were already sensitive to the visual differences between these interaction forms even in static visual images (i.e., they showed more gaze shift frequency for the face-to-face models; Handl et al., 2013), the relationship between the infants' recognition of third-party interactions and the inconsistent responses to these different measures used in these studies remains unclear. Thus, we included both 9month-old and 1-year-old infants to test whether they perform differently due to their developing understanding of third-party interactions. ...
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    ... In the interaction phase, greater looking frequency (but not longer looking time) to the models was found in the face-toface condition than in the back-to-back condition (as predicted in Hypothesis 2). This face-to-face effect has also been reported in previous studies that used either dynamic or static stimuli (Augusti et al., 2010;Handl et al., 2013;Gustafsson et al., 2016). Another aspect of our results, although not significant, was that the 1.5-year-old infants tended to show a higher looking frequency than the younger age groups. ...
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  • ... February 2014 | Volume 8 | Article 29 | 12 embodied level where the perturbation structure of the world constitutes the data set (Ikegami, 2007). give a simple computational example of how exploratory gaze patterns structured by spiral waves can enact perception of a global property of a social scene (co-orientation), as has been observed in infants (Augusti et al., 2010;Handl et al., 2013). ...
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