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    • "In agreement with other studies,5,7-11 drugs that were suspected to be responsible for most of the self-reported drug hypersensitivity were NSAIDs and β-lactams, but sulfonamide antibiotics were also responsible. Antibiotics are largely used during childhood and teenage years for treating common infections, specially these two classes.12 More than two thirds of the reactions were reported to happen during the first 20 years of life, and in most cases, the drug was taken orally. "
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    ABSTRACT: Drug hypersensitivity is responsible for substantial mortality and morbidity, and increased health costs. However, epidemiological data on drug hypersensitivity in general or specific populations are scarce. We performed a cross-sectional survey of 1015 university students, using a self-reported questionnaire. The prevalence of self-reported drug hypersensitivity was 12,11% (123/1015). The most frequently implicated drugs were non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (45,9%) and beta-lactam and sulfonamide antibiotics (25,40%). The majority of the patients reported dermatological manifestations (99), followed by respiratory (40), digestive (23) and other (19). Forty-five patients had an immediate type reaction, and 76,72% (89) had the drug by oral route. The results showed that drug hypersensitivity is highly prevalent in university students, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and antibiotics (beta-lactams and sulfonamide) are the most frequently concerned drugs.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2010 · Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil)
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents a review, based on a qualitative study, of pharmaceutical orientation in the management of minor illness. Action research methodology was used by a group of faculty members responsible for the community pharmacy internship and by postgraduates in clinical pharmacy, to carry out the study with the objective to present a standard service for this kind of procedure. The interaction with the individual starts with a welcoming reception, at which point the pharmacist should be receptive and show empathy. Subsequently, data from the history of the patient are collected to obtain relevant information. Based on this information, the pharmacist must develop a line of clinical reasoning and make a decision, taking the context of the patient into account. After this analysis, the most appropriate intervention is performed. This intervention could indicate the need for referral to another health professional, the use of a non-pharmacological therapy or the provision of sound advice on medicines available without prescription. The next step is monitoring the patient in order to identify the effectiveness and safety of treatment. The standardization process of pharmaceutical attendance in the management of minor disorders contributes to the rational use of medicines.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2009 · Brazilian Journal of Pharmaceutical Science
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the prevalence of drugs use without medical prescription in Teresina, PI, the motivations of use and drugs groups most used. Methods: Cross sectional random sample consisted of 464 adults living in the urban area of Teresina-PI. Sociodemographic variables and self-medication were investigated. Results: The prevalence of self-medication has reached 92.7%. Painkillers were the most frequently consumed drugs (63.4%). The main justification for self-medication was previous experience with the product. Abdominal cramps (85.3%), diarrhea (76.5%) and menstrual cramps (74.0%) were the main reasons cited for the practice of self medication. Conclusion: It was demonstrated of self-medication among Teresina people. In agreement to that found in other studies, analgesics represent a class of drugs most used, with pain being the main motive of selfmedication, and previous experience with the drug was the main justification for self-medication.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2011
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