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Minimizing Construction Vibration Effects

Authors:
  • VIBRACONSULT, United States, Cleveland

Abstract

Harmful vibration effects of construction operations occur frequently. Ground vibrations may affect adjacent and remote structures. The level of structure vibrations depends on a number of factors such as characterized sources of vibrations, soil conditions, and susceptibility of structures. There is no unique solution to minimize the effects of construction vibrations at every site. Monitoring and control of construction vibrations are made to be in compliance with safe vibration criteria. Reasonable vibration criteria should be chosen for a site.
... The suggested value for the exponent n is 1.1, but it can vary from 1.0 to 1.4 to reflect different soil types. Construction-induced vibrations must be inspected and controlled by following the criteria of safe vibration [17,18]. Many construction projects implement the practice of real-time construction vibration monitoring in a compulsive manner. ...
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Various construction activities (such as piling) often generate high-intensity ground vibrations that adversely affect the surrounding environment. A common way of assessing vibration impact is to conduct on-site ground vibration monitoring at several selected locations. However, as vibration sources are often not pinpointed in the construction process, this approach cannot predict the vibration intensities at locations other than those monitored points. Therefore, the localization of vibration sources (e.g., vibratory sheet pile driving location) is crucial to quantify the corresponding vibration intensities in a broad area. This paper investigates a time-based source localization method based on wave propagation characteristics derived via three-dimensional finite element modeling of vibratory sheet pile driving in an infinite half-space soil domain. Satisfactory accuracy in the localization of the vibratory driving sources was achieved in all investigated numerical examples. Field validation tests were also conducted on a construction site with ongoing vibratory sheet pile driving work. A site-specific empirical formula was adopted to model the attenuation of measured vibration intensities with the increasing distance from the localized vibration source. As such, the combined utilization of the estimated vibration source location and the adopted empirical formula can achieve vibration intensity assessment in a broad surrounding area rather than being confined to a few monitored points.
... Civil engineering construction works can be viewed as an important source of vibrations. Even when construction is for a limited time, when performed close to buildings, the generated seismic waves can disturb people and activities, cause damages to existing equipment and, in extreme scenarios, damage surrounding structures [1,2]. The activities can include pile driving, soil excavation, site clearing, truck traffic, compaction with vibratory equipment and the removal of existing buildings, among others [3,4]. ...
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The automatization of construction activities, which aims to reduce the time and cost of constructions, makes impact pile driving an interesting technique. However, these activities in urban areas can generate excessive vibrations and interfere with people and structures in the vicinity. With that in mind, predicting the expected vibration levels during the project design stage is essential. Different methodologies can be employed in this task, from empirical approaches to detailed and complex numerical formulations. This paper intends to present an overview of the empirical methods and the main physics of the problem from a numerical point of view. The results obtained are then compared with experimental vibration data reported in the literature in order to discuss the adequacy of empirical and numerical methodologies in predicting ground-borne vibrations induced by impact pile driving.
... The PPV can better evaluate the structures start from damage than the PPD and PPA. The PPV is defined as the maximum velocity that a particle experiences during vibration occurrence, and it is generally used for measuring the structure damage (Svinkin 2004;Abdel-Rasoul and Mohamed 2006). Several formulas have been defined for the PPV evaluation during vibration events going from the following: peak vector sum (PVS) (Lidén 2012;Ekanayake et al. 2013) ...
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The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of recommended existing criteria of ground vibrations generated by blasting. It is shown that these criteria have limited liability because they were found for specific categories of structures. A new approach based on measurement of structure vibrations is suggested for assessment of damage in structures subjected to blasting vibrations. This approach provides the flexibility of implicitly considering a variety of soil-structure interaction and structure conditions. It is explained a new frequency-independent safe-level criterion of 51 mm/s (2 in/s) for the PPV of structural vibrations. Attention is brought to use seismographs properly calibrated for the required frequency range. Positive flexibility is demonstrated in assessment of structure and component of concern vibrations from blasting.
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A method for predicting the complete time-domain vibration records of soil and structures prior to installation of foundations for impact machines is described in detail. A paper provides support for the validity of accepted assumptions about the use of impacts directly on the soil for estimating the impulse response functions, and the effect of load zone dimensions on soil vibrations. The procedures for experimental testing on a site and computing the predicted complete vibration records are developed. Resulting patterns of computed and measured vibrations are shown for block-type foundation and a foundation under a vibroisolated block for impact machine. Furthermore, the method enables us to consider the heterogeneity and variety of soil and structure properties. In particular, it is useful under nonuniform and complicated soil conditions for determination and verification of safe distances from machine foundations to objects sensitive to vibrations.
Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to whole body vibration.'' ANSI S3.18-1979 American National Standards Institute ͑ANSI͒. ͑1983͒. ''Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to vibrations in buildings.'' ANSI S3
  • American National
  • Standards Institute
  • ͑ansi͒ ͑1979͒
American National Standards Institute ͑ANSI͒. ͑1979͒. ''Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to whole body vibration.'' ANSI S3.18-1979, New York. American National Standards Institute ͑ANSI͒. ͑1983͒. ''Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to vibrations in buildings.'' ANSI S3.29-1983, New York.