Article

Euler-Based Dynamic Aeroelastic Analysis of Shell Structures

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Abstract

A computational aeroelastic method has been extended to evaluate the static and dynamic characteristics of flexible shell structures. The numerical method applied was the ENS3DAE solver, which permits evaluation of high-order aerodynamic and structure interactions. Modifications to the code to permit smooth transition of internal flowfield characteristics and deflections for shell structures have been developed and verified, The modified methodology has been tested on a problem of merit in the engine community, an axisymmetric engine liner that has exhibited dynamic instabilities. An investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the liner, including Butter, was carried out. The results were compared with experimental data and demonstrate the ability of the method to analyze shell flutter problems of this kind.

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