Article

Poly-MVA for Treating Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Study of an Integrative Approach

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Abstract

We investigated the dietary supplement Poly-MVA as an integrative treatment for a patient diagnosed with advanced stage 4 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite multidrug resistance, the patient continued to have a good quality of life and did well on a performance scale score. The addition of Poly-MVA to her therapeutic protocol may have allowed her to feel well despite clinical failure as evidenced by rising tumor markers. Approximately 2 years after diagnosis she responded to an older chemotherapeutic regimen of 5′-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C while taking Poly-MVA. She had an excellent clinical response as confirmed by significant clinical improvement on a computed tomography scan. Her last tumor marker levels were significantly decreased, with her carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level slightly elevated at 5.5 (normal is < 3.1 ng/mL) and her CA 19-9 normal at 16.7 (normal is < 30 μ/mL). She continues to have a good quality of life, does well on the performance scale, feels well and remains on Poly-MVA. After providing background on NSCLC and pharmaceuticals and on Poly-MVA, we describe the patient's treatment with this supplement and her response to it.

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... Similarly, leaves of the moringa tree [35] and the ashitaba plant [36], and the baked cocoa extract of seeds of the cacao (chocolate) plant [37], reportedly have multiple medical benefits. Even the use of intravenous ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) in chelation therapy [38] and the uses of notable therapeutics such as Poly-MVA (lipoic acid, palladium, thiamine trimer) [39][40] may, in fact, be essentially infusions of activated water. ...
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